The Reliants Project podcast

M1E4: Conversations to Maintain Relationships and Exchange Value

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In this episode, Georgie and I focus on conversations any of us might have when we are maintaining a relationship or hoping to harness it in support of a specific objective. These types of chats often happen when you have news to share or realise that the other person might be able to help you reach a goal. We call these 'maintenance' conversations because they help to maintain the relationship between two people.

Georgie and I try out 3 different types of maintenance conversations in this episode

  • In the first conversation, I've reached out because I want to share news with her about a change in my life
  • In the second one, she has reached out to ask for an introduction to someone I happen to know
  • In the third conversation, one of us has reached out because we hadn't spoken to the other person in many months
  • Just like before, after each example conversation, we point out the things that we think are helpful and some of the patterns we see emerge between these chats and previous ones in this series

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