In Depth, Out Loud podcast

Climate crisis: how science fiction can inspire humanity’s response

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How science fiction’s hopes and fears can inspire humanity’s response to the climate crisis. Chris Pak, lecturer in English Literature at Swansea University, explores the history of science fiction stories about terraforming, geoengineering, space and climate change – and why they're vital reading ahead of the November 2021 UN climate change conference in Glasgow.


You can read the text version of this in-depth article here. The audio version is read by Peter Hanly in partnership with Noa, News Over Audio. You can listen to more articles from The Conversation, for free, on the Noa app.


The music in In Depth Out Loud is Night Caves by Lee Rosevere. In Depth Out Loud is produced by Gemma Ware.


This story came out of a project at The Conversation called Insights supported by Research England. You can read more stories in the series here.


See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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    Climate crisis: how science fiction can inspire humanity’s response

    23:57

    How science fiction’s hopes and fears can inspire humanity’s response to the climate crisis. Chris Pak, lecturer in English Literature at Swansea University, explores the history of science fiction stories about terraforming, geoengineering, space and climate change – and why they're vital reading ahead of the November 2021 UN climate change conference in Glasgow. You can read the text version of this in-depth article here. The audio version is read by Peter Hanly in partnership with Noa, News Over Audio. You can listen to more articles from The Conversation, for free, on the Noa app. The music in In Depth Out Loud is Night Caves by Lee Rosevere. In Depth Out Loud is produced by Gemma Ware.This story came out of a project at The Conversation called Insights supported by Research England. You can read more stories in the series here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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