Everyday Economics podcast

Episode 5: Perfect competition, Uber, and the Climate Clock

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In this episode, we discuss about the Climate Clock which appeared in Manhattan last week and why it can be counter-productive in order to fight climate change. We also discuss about the recent letter sent by many economists asking Justin Trudeau to reevaluate the Trans-Mountain pipelines project. After that we debate about the gig-economy and what is going to change for companies such as Uber. Finally, we try to understand why the healthcare in the U.S. is so expensive! If you want to react and be a part our podcast (as Maïlys did today), send us a voice or a text message at one of the following addresses: @gregoire_mld on Instagram, or with the function message here https://anchor.fm/everydayeconomics, or e-mail.

Stay safe and see you next week!

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