Diaspora Collective podcast

2 part mini-series: How to catch a wokefish

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Have you ever encountered someone who presented themselves as a liberal, anti-racist, intersectional feminist, oat milk drinking activist? But the more time you spent with them, the more you started to notice racist, misogynist and homophobic comments they make - whether it was justified as a joke, offhanded comment, or something that their friends tolerate. Well, we hate to say it but you may have been wokefished. In this week’s episode, we discuss the concept of “wokefishing”, a term originally coined by Serena Smith. We explore it’s origins, how it can play out in different social settings, such as work, dating and friendships, and how to catch them out.

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