A Brief History of Stuff podcast

Menstruation products

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Around 800 million people across the world are menstruating right now, using a variety of products and methods to deal with their blood. But accessing these products can be a challenge, even today.

In this episode, host Nihal Arthanayake speaks to curator Rebecca Raven about the fascinating stories behind the menstruation products many of us use, while Dr Suba Thiyagalingam discusses period poverty, taboos and why we should talk more about periods.

From the Roman empire to the first world war and from sanitary belts to modern mooncups, you’ll learn how people dealt with periods in the past, discover the impact of disposable products on the environment and hear about the possibilities of a more sustainable future.    

This episode was inspired by a mooncup and tampon in the Science Museum Group Collection. Our incredible collection contains more than 7 million items which illustrate the impact of science, technology, engineering and medicine on all our lives. 

A Brief History of Stuff is a Storythings and Science Museum Group production.

Find out more about this episode on our website. You can discover more stories about the everyday objects around you, including menstruation products. Read about the sustainable items recently added to our collection and the life of sanitary belt pioneer Mary Kenner on our blog.   

Follow the Science Museum on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for more insights into the collection and use #ABriefHistoryOfStuff to join the conversation on social media.

You can follow Dr Suba on Instagram and listen to her wonderful podcast In Hysterics.  

Subscribe to A Brief History of Stuff wherever you listen to podcasts to be the first to hear new episodes. To help others discover A Brief History of Stuff, please rate our podcast. You can support this podcast and our museums by donating online

If you have an idea for a future episode or want to share your thoughts on our podcast, please email us via [email protected].

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    Trailer

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