The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution

Gene Kim

Multiple award-winning CTO, researcher, and bestselling author Gene Kim hosts technology and business leaders to explore the dangerous, shifting digital landscape.

23 Episódios

  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    Simplifying The Inventory Management Systems at the World’s Largest Retailer Using Functional Programming Principles with Scott Havens

    2:03:15

    In this episode of The Idealcast, Gene Kim speaks with Scott Havens, who is the Director of Engineering at Wayfair, where he leads Engineering for the Wayfair Fulfillment Network. Havens is a leading proponent of applying functional programming principles to technical and organizational design. Previously, Havens was the architect for Walmart's global omnichannel inventory system, unifying availability and replenishment for the largest company in the world by revenue. Havens shares his views on what makes great architecture great. He details what happened when an API call required 23 other synchronous procedures calls to return a correct answer. He discusses the challenges of managing inventory at Wal-Mart, how one implements event sourcing patterns on that scale, and the functional programming principles that it depends upon. Lastly, he talks about how much category theory you need to know to do functional programming and considerations when creating code in complex systems. Before listening to this interview, please listen to Episode 22, which provides Scott Havens's  2019 DevOps Enterprise Summit talk with commentary from Gene Kim.   ABOUT THE GUEST(S) Scott Havens is a Director of Engineering at Wayfair, where he leads Engineering for the Wayfair Fulfillment Network. Scott cares deeply about scalable data-intensive software systems; he is a leading proponent of applying functional programming principles to technical and organizational design. Previously, Havens was a Director of Engineering at Jet.com and was the architect for Walmart's global omnichannel inventory system, unifying availability and replenishment for the largest company in the world by revenue. In his home life, Havens enjoys good food, good wine, bad movies, and asking his daughter to stop "redecorating" his Minecraft castles, pretty please. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scott-havens/ Twitter: @ScottHavens Email: scott@sphavens.com   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT His views on what makes great architectures great The details on what happened when an API call requires 23 other synchronous procedures calls to return a correct answer How one implements event sourcing patterns on a large scale, using Wal-Mart as an example, and the functional programming principles it depends upon The challenges of managing inventory at Wal-Mart How much category theory to know to do functional programming   RESOURCES Currying Function composition (computer science) Idempotence Love Letter To Clojure: And A Datomic Experience Report - Gene Kim Side effect (computer science) Functional Geekery Episode 129 – Eric Normand Theory of Functional Programming skill Ruby Conf 12 - Boundaries by Gary Bernhardt Functional Design in Clojure Podcast - Ep 021: Mutate the Internet Lean Summit 2013 - Art Byrne - What does it take to Lead a Lean Turnaround? Thoughts On Functional Programming Podcast - 3 Examples Of Algebraic Thinking CORECURSIVE #050 - Portal Abstractions with Sam Ritchie: How abstract algebra solves data engineering Adam Grant’s tweet about coding   TIMESTAMPS [00:24] Intro [02:23] Meet Scott Havens [03:48] How architecture fits in functional programming [04:48] Event source systems at Wal-Mart  [19:45] The effects and behaviors [22:36] Duality of code and data [26:13] Currying [32:34] How the 23 service teams’s world change [40:56] Hallmarks of great architecture [51:10] How he replaced the dominant architecture at Wal-Mart [56:46] Configurations and speculations with couplings [1:03:51] How can simple systems suffer from problems like this [1:09:11] Idempotence, Clojure and side effect [1:17:01] Issues with switching to event-driven asynchronous architectures [1:25:15] Vast scale in which these organizations operate in [1:29:54] A moment that showed Scott the effects of what he helped create [1:33:51] Onboarding new engineers to the new system [1:45:11] Working in the Windows 3.1 multicast networking group [1:47:32] Reflection on Moda Operandi experience [1:52:11] Advice to someone who wants to replicate Scott’s journey [1:56:17] What to understand about category theory and algebraic thinking [2:01:11] How to contact Scott [2:02:48] Outro
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    (Dispatch from the Scenius) Fabulous Fortunes, Fewer Failures, and Faster Fixes from Functional Fundamentals: Scott Havens’ 2019 DevOps Enterprise Summit Talk with Commentary from Gene Kim

    38:57

    In this episode of The Idealcast, Gene Kim shares and gives commentary on Scott Havens’ talk from the 2019 DevOps Enterprise Summit Las Vegas. Havens is a Director of Engineering at Wayfair, where he leads Engineering for the Wayfair Fulfillment Network. He is a leading proponent of applying functional programming principles to technical and organizational design. Previously, Scott was the architect for Walmart's global omnichannel inventory system, unifying availability and replenishment for the largest company in the world by revenue. In his 2019 DevOps Enterprise Summit talk, Havens highlights functional programming and e-commerce systems work. He also talks about what he did to massively simplify those systems while also making them more testable, reliable, cheaper to operate, and easier to change. Finally, he discusses the implications of using functional programming to change how to design systems and systems of systems on a larger scale.   ABOUT THE GUEST Scott Havens is Director of Engineering at Wayfair, where he leads Engineering for the Wayfair Fulfillment Network. Scott cares deeply about scalable data-intensive software systems. He is a leading proponent of applying functional programming principles to technical and organizational design. Previously, Scott was Director of Engineering at Jet.com and was the architect for Walmart’s global omnichannel inventory system, unifying availability and replenishment for the largest company in the world by revenue. In his home life, Scott enjoys good food, good wine, bad movies, and asking his daughter to stop “redecorating” his Minecraft castles, pretty please.   LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scott-havens/ Twitter: @ScottHavens Email: scott@sphavens.com   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT Functional programming and what it is. How e-commerce systems work. What Havens did to massively simplify those systems while also making them more testable, reliable, cheaper to operate, and easier to change. The implications of using functional programming to change how to design systems and systems of systems on a larger scale.   RESOURCES Fabulous Fortunes, Fewer Failures, and Faster Fixes from Functional Fundamentals: Scott Havens’ 2019 DevOps Enterprise Summit Talk  Slidedeck for the Havens’ 2019 DOES talk Clojure Pass by reference (C++ only) John Carmack John Carmack Keynote - Quakecon 2013 Panther Systems   TIMESTAMPS [00:24] Intro [02:52] Functional programming [07:59] Gene introduces Scott [09:13] Working at Wal-Mart [11:13] Disaster struck [14:10] One common piece of e-commerce website functionality [17:07] The implications of functional programming for system design [21:05] Changing how to design systems and systems of systems [28:55] Using Panther [33:11] How this affects the hot path and cost [36:43] One bite a time [37:52] Contacting Scott [38:13] Outro
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    Não percas um episódio de The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution e subscrevê-lo na aplicação GetPodcast.

    iOS buttonAndroid button
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    Open Source Software as a Triumph of Information Hiding, Modularity, and Creating Optionality with Dr. Gail Murphy

    2:11:59

    In this newest episode of The Idealcast, Gene Kim speaks with Dr. Gail Murphy, Professor of Computer Science and Vice President of Research and Innovation at the University of British Columbia. She is also the co-founder, board member, and former Chief Scientist at Tasktop. Dr. Murphy’s research focuses on improving the productivity of software developers and knowledge workers by providing the necessary tools to identify, manage, and coordinate the information that matters most for their work.   During the episode, Kim and Dr. Murphy explore the properties of modularity and information hiding, and how one designs architectures that create them. They also discuss how open source libraries create the incredible software supply chains that developers benefit from everyday, and the surprising new risks they can create.   They discuss the ramifications of system design considerations and decisions made by software developers and why defining software developers’ productivity remains elusive. They further consider open-source software as a triumph of information hiding and how it has created a massively interdependent set of libraries while also enabling incredible co-evolution, which is only made possible by modularity. Listen as Kim and Dr. Murphy discuss how technologists have both succeeded and fallen short on the dream of software being like building blocks, how software development is a subset of knowledge work, and the implications of that insight.   ABOUT THE GUEST   Gail C. Murphy is a Professor of Computer Science and Vice President of Research and Innovation at the University of British Columbia. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), as well as co-founder, board member, and former Chief Scientist at Tasktop.   After completing her BS at the University of Alberta in 1987, she worked for five years as a software engineer in the Lower Mainland. She later pursued graduate studies in computer science at the University of Washington, earning first a MS (1994) and then a PhD (1996) before joining University of British Columbia.   Dr. Murphy’s research focuses on improving the productivity of software developers and knowledge workers by providing the necessary tools to identify, manage, and coordinate the information that matters most for their work. She also maintains an active research group with post-doctoral and graduate students. YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT Why defining software developers’ productivity remains elusive and how developers talk about what factors make them feel productive. The value of modularity and how one can achieve it. Ways to decompose software that can have surprising outcomes for even small systems. How open-source software is a triumph of information hiding, creating a massively interdependent set of libraries that also enable incredible co-evolution, which is only made possible by modularity. How we have exceeded and fallen short of the 1980s dream of software being like building blocks, where we can quickly create software by assembling modules, and what we have learned from the infamous leftpad and mime-magic incidents in the last two years. Why and how, in very specific areas, the entire software industry has standardized on a set of modules versus in other areas, where we continue to seemingly go in the opposite direction. A summary of some of the relevant work of Dr. Carliss Baldwin, the William L. White Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. Dr. Baldwin studies the process of design and its impact of design architecture on firm strategy, platforms, and business ecosystems. How software development is a subset of knowledge work and the implications of that insight. RESOURCES Dr. Mik Kersten on The Idealcast Project to Product: How to Survive and Thrive in the Age of Digital Disruption with the Flow Framework by Mik Kersten Tasktop The Unicorn Project: A Novel about Developers, Digital Disruption, and Thriving in the Age of Data by Gene Kim Fred Brooks The Mythical Man-Month On the Criteria To Be Used in Decomposing Systems into Modules by Dr. D.L. Parnas Comparison of embedded computer systems on board the Mars rovers Joshua Bloch How to design a good API and why it matters by Joshua Bloch Tricking Sand into Thinking: Deep Learning in Clojure by Dave Liepmann Gene Kim’s reaction on Twitter Gource Gource in Bloom 800+ days of Minecraft in 8 minutes History of Bitcoin History of Python Eclipse Mylyn by Dr. Mik Kersten How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript Laurie Voss’ tweet Rails 5.2.5, 6.0.3.6 and 6.1.3.1 have been released Have there been any lawsuits involving breach of open source licences? GNU General Public License SemanticConflict Fostering Software Developer Productivity through Awareness Increase and Goal-Setting by André Meyer Gail Murphy on Mik + One Podcast On the criteria to be used in decomposing systems into modules Thoughts on Functional Programming Podcast by Eric Normand Alistair Cockburn’s programming challenge on Twitter Gene Kim’s tweet about BLAS: Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms Gene Kim’s tweet about the Gource visualization on the scores of people making commits to the Python ecosystem repo Gene Kim’s Twitter thread about Dr. Carliss Baldwin’s talk: Part 1, Part 2 Academy of Management 2015 TIM Distinguished Scholar Prof Carliss Baldwin Design Rules, Vol. 1: The Power of Modularity by Carliss Y. Baldwin and Kim B. Clark Robert C. Merton Black–Scholes model Product Design and Development by Karl Ulrich Design structure matrix Three design structure matrices Real Option TIMESTAMPS [00:27] Intro [03:52] Meet Dr. Murphy [04:32] Determining where design occurs in software development [10:30] Refactoring [16:08] Defining developer productivity and why it defies explanation [20:26] What is modularity, architecture and why they’re important [28:52] An extreme example [30:51] Information hiding [36:06] The leftpad and mime-magic incidents and SemanticConflict [44:13] The work of André Meyer [47:23] Open source is a triumph of information hiding [52:56] Architectures give different trade offs to different problems [57:25] Relationships between a leader’s roles and responsibilities [1:05:10] BLAS: Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms [1:09:20] Communication paths within an organization [1:16:58] The Mylyn project [1:20:11] Analysis of Dr. David Parnas’ 1972 paper [1:26:23] Falcon missile program and socio-technical congruence [1:31:10] The work of Dr. Carliss Baldwin [1:40:01] How Dr. Baldwin defines modularity [1:47:26] Modularity and open source software [1:51:31] Defining real options [1:53:17] 1 billion dollar rearchitecture project [1:55:29] This work is primarily about making decisions [2:01:58] Open source systems are Darwinian systems [2:06:33] Dr. Murphy’s ideal of software developer’s daily work [2:09:53] How to contact Dr. Murphy [2:11:01] Outro
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    Exploring COVID-19 and Just-in-Time Supply Chains, Chaos Engineering, and the Soviet Centrally Planned Economy with Dr. Steve Spear

    2:01:00

    In this episode of The Idealcast, Gene Kim speaks with Dr. Steven Spear on his critiques of several articles from the NY Times and the Wall Street Journal, and their characterization of the impact of Just-in-Time (JIT) supply chains and the widespread shortages caused by the COVID-19 global pandemic. While the unprecedented health crisis created a widespread shortage of almost everything—from toilet paper to semiconductor chips to raw materials vital for medical materials—with results that impacted everyday life on a global scale, Dr. Spear makes the claim that JIT lessened the severity of shortages, as opposed to causing them. The discussion is informed by Spear’s work on accelerating learning dynamics within organizations and the Toyota Production System, and from his time observing and working directly with a tier-one Toyota supplier. Kim and Spear dive deep into supply chain dynamics and why they are important to society. The discussion delves into how JIT manufacturing not only revolutionized manufacturing but also the entire manufacturing supply chain and how it increased (not decreased) resilience, productivity, efficiency, and prosperity.  They also explore the structure and dynamics of these JIT supply chains, as well as the similarities of the famous Netflix Chaos Monkey, famous for helping Netflix build resilient services that can survive even widespread cloud outages and the larger, emerging field of Chaos Engineers (arguably, a subset of resilience engineering). Additionally, they explore Toyota’s manufacturing and how its history helped it become one of the least impacted by the semiconductor shortages. They follow that with an examination of the JIT’s antithesis and how it’s similar to the dynamics found in the Soviet’s centrally planned economy, particularly with its IT structure and dynamic results. Kim and Spear tie these things into the three basic tools of finance: net present value, option theory, and portfolio diversification.   ABOUT THE GUESTS Dr. Steve Spear (DBA MS MS) is principal for HVE LLC, the award-winning author of The High-Velocity Edge, and patent holder for the See to Solve Real Time Alert System. A Senior Lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School and a Senior Fellow at the Institute, Dr. Spear’s work focuses on accelerating learning dynamics within organizations so that they know better and faster what to do and how to do it. This has been informed and tested in practice in multiple industries including heavy industry, high tech design, biopharm R&D, healthcare delivery and other social services, US Army rapid equipping, and US Navy readiness.   Visit Steve Spear's Website   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT What are supply chains, why they’re so vast and complex, and why they are important to society How Just-in-Time (JIT) manufacturing revolutionize manufacturing, the entire manufacturing supply chain, and the supply chain for basically everything How JIT increased, not deceased, the resilience of the supply chain Why Toyota is one of the auto manufacturers least impacted by the semiconductor shortages, partially as a result of what they learned during the Fukushima earthquake and tsunami in 2011 How the structure and dynamics of the Toyota supply chain are almost exactly the same as the structure and dynamics of great systems discussed in previous episodes, such as the COVID mass vaccination clinic with Trent Green and Team of Teams How Toyota has the ability to reconfigure themselves with a low cost of change How these principles are very similar to Netflix chaos monkey and the entire field of what is now called chaos engineering How the antithesis of  JIT is similar to the dynamics found in the Soviet’s centrally planned economy, particularly with its IT structure and results in dynamics How inventory is a substitute for knowledge How this all ties into the three basic tools of finance: net present value, option theory, and portfolio diversification   RESOURCES Announcing New Book from Gene Kim and Dr. Steven J. Spear NPR: Plastic Is The New Toilet Paper For Scientists New York Times: Shopping for Fashion, Six Months On Planet Money: Negative Oil New York Times: How the World Ran Out of Everything New York Times: ‘I’ve Never Seen Anything Like This’: Chaos Strikes Global Shipping Wall Street Journal: Auto Makers Retreat From 50 Years of ‘Just in Time’ Manufacturing The Mainframe DevOps Team Saves the Day at Walmart Frontline: Always Low Prices “The Beer Game” by Prof. John D. Sterman Lean manufacturing Baseline: The End of the Just in Time Supply Chain Method Fast Company: Living in Dell Time CNBC: We traced what it takes to make an iPhone, from its initial design to the components and raw materials needed to make it a reality An Econometric Analysis of Inventory Turnover Performance in Retail Services by Vishal Gaur, Marshall L. Fisher, and Ananth Raman Inventory to Sales Ratio Gross Profit Margin Using FRED site to to calculate ratios of inventory to sales from 1946 to now Walmart vs. Amazon Reuters: Half of U.S. auto suppliers face bankruptcy: study 21st Century Jet - Building the Boeing 777 Episode 3 Boeing 777 — The Ultimate History (II) ASTA SOLUTIONS PTY. LTD. 21st Century Jet - Building the Boeing 777 Episode 2 See Every Single Part Inside an iPhone Code as supply chain How Many Millions of Lines of Code Does It Take? Top 15 Biggest Car Manufacturers in the World (1999 - 2017) Moore's Law graphed vs real CPUs & GPUs 1965 - 2019 The Myth of Productivity vs Compliance: How To Have It All  Reuters: How Toyota thrives when the chips are down BBC News: Tesla partners with nickel mine amid shortage fears Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster Forbes: Toyota's 'Quake-Proof' Supply Chain That Never Was The Netflix Simian Army Basic Economics by Thomas Sowell Los Angeles Business Journal: Just-in-Time Inventory System Proves Vulnerable to Labor Strife Closed California ports impact on the supply chain “We’d Have to Sink the Ships”: Impact Studies and the 2002 West Coast Port Lockout by Peter V. Hall Reuters: How Toyota thrives when the chips are down “The Simpsons” evolution Example of language of simplification and stabilization   TIMESTAMPS [00:37] Intro [09:07] What Dr. Spear found objectionable in the NYT article [13:41] How JIT increased resilience of the supply chain [17:18] What are supply chains and what makes it so complex [24:11] The economic impact of inventory and recapture [28:17] The impact created by mass adoption of JIT practices [42:00] JIT vs lean manufacturing [44:46] How Toyota could handle the semiconductor shortage [51:19] An example of the resilience of Toyota’s supply chain and manufacturing capabilities [57:03] How to motivate everyone to mobilize [1:02:12] What happened with Netflix’s chaos monkey and EYE-shin mattress factory plant [1:08:13] Twitter feedback [1:09:37] The link between experimentation at the EYE-shin plant and low cost of change [1:17:30] Four characters of simplification, standardization, stabilization and synchronization [1:20:46] The 2002 West Coast Port Lockout [1:33:43] What triggered this conversation [1:38:57] The opposite of JIT [1:43:11] Three finance theories [1:50:45] How the Soviet’s centrally planned economy compares with the four characteristics [1:58:23] A misunderstanding of JIT [2:05:15] Outro
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    Unleashing Human Creativity To Deliver 8K+ COVID Vaccines Per Day and Improve the Overall Healthcare System with Trent Green

    1:39:22

    In March of 2021, Gene Kim visited the mass vaccination site at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, which has been described by the press as a logistical masterpiece where over 465,000 Oregonians have been vaccinated as of May 2021. After a three-hour tour of the site, Gene Kim sat down with Trent Green, Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) at Legacy Health and one of the organizers of the mass vaccination operation. Kim and Green discuss firsthand what it looks like to vaccinate 8,000 people a day and the strategic level of planning it took to produce and operate the mass vaccination clinic. Green reveals what those first few days of operation were like and how the site was able to increase distribution from 2,000 vaccines per day to 8,000 per day. Lastly, he discusses the lessons he learned during the rollout process and how those lessons can inform how to improve the overall health care system. Also joining the conversation is Dr. Steve Spear, who has helped the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiative create its “Perfecting Patient Care System” and has worked on a few pilot programs with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.   ABOUT THE GUESTS Trent Green, COO of Legacy Health, focusing on innovation in Legacy Health’s hospital operations and service lines, and responsible for Legacy Laboratory Services, Legacy Imaging Services and Unity Center. Green oversees the OHSU Knight-Legacy Health Cancer Collaborative, the LifeFlight partnership, as well as other ventures that directly impact hospital operations. Prior to his most recent role, Green served as Legacy Health’s senior vice president, chief strategy officer, and president of Legacy Medical Group. He brings more than 20 years of experience in leading health care organizations, with specific strengths and accomplishments in clinic and hospital operations, strategic planning, business development, marketing, mergers and acquisitions, and finance.    Green’s notable achievements include advancing a re-imagined Master Facility Plan for the Legacy Emanuel and Randall Children’s Hospital campus; navigating a complex regulatory situation at Unity Center by providing decisive leadership and a unified approach to problem-solving, resulting in the successful restoration of status, cultural alignment, best in system performance on medication administration practices, and accelerated incident review and mitigation implementation practices. He also led and developed several of Legacy’s most transformational initiatives, including the PacificSource joint venture, Silverton Health affiliation, Legacy-GoHealth urgent care joint venture, and the OHSU Knight–Legacy Health Cancer Collaborative, among others.   Dr. Steve Spear (DBA MS MS) is principal for HVE LLC, the award-winning author of The High-Velocity Edge, and patent holder for the See to Solve Real Time Alert System. A Senior Lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School and a Senior Fellow at the Institute, Dr. Spear’s work focuses on accelerating learning dynamics within organizations so that they know better and faster what to do and how to do it. This has been informed and tested in practice in multiple industries including heavy industry, high tech design, biopharm R&D, healthcare delivery and other social services, US Army rapid equipping, and US Navy readiness.   Visit Steve Spear's Website   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT Green’s role as the Chief Operating Officer, how it compares to the Chief Medical Officer, and what are the other key leadership roles in a healthcare organization The strategic level of planning, human creativity, and problem-solving it took to produce and operate the mass vaccination clinic as efficient as possible Green’s role and the various leadership roles at the vaccination clinic What the first days of operations at the vaccination site were like The major milestones Green saw as distribution increased from 2,000 vaccines per day to 8,000 vaccines per day Fast versus slow integrated problem-solving styles and theory building versus theory testing The lessons Green has learned during the COVID vaccination rollout process and how these lessons could inform how to improve the overall health care system   RESOURCES Trent Green’s bio at Legacy Health Legacy Health Videos from DevOps Enterprise Summit Virtual - Europe NPR: Half Of All U.S. Adults Are Now Fully Vaccinated Against COVID-19 Willamette Week: Oregon’s Largest Vaccination Site is a Logistical Masterpiece. We Take You Inside. Tweet describing the vaccination site with “apocalypse vibe” The Unicorn Project: A Novel about Developers, Digital Disruption, and Thriving in the Age of Data by Gene Kim FEMA Region 10’s video featuring Starbucks and Trent Green The Indicator from Planet Money: Why Hospitals Are Laying People Off The Indicator from Planet Money: Healthcare: The Pandemic's Financial Fallout Operation Warp Speed Eroom's law Fast and Slow Integrated Problem Solving Structures with Gene Kim and Dr. Steve Spear Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World by General Stanley A. McChrystal with Chris Fussell, David Silverman, Tantum Collins Mastering Outages with Incident Command for DevOps: Learning from the Fire Department Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System by Dr. Steven Spear and H. Kent Bowen Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman The DevOps Enterprise Journal: White Papers from the 2020 DevOps Enterprise Summits The High-Velocity Edge: How Market Leaders Leverage Operational Excellence to Beat the Competition by Steven J. Spear The DevOps Enterprise Journal: White Papers from the 2020 DevOps Enterprise Summits The PDSA Cycle (Plan-Do-Study-Act) Leadership Lessons Learned From Improving Flow In Hospital Settings using Theory of Constraints by Dr. Chris Strear Smash the Bottleneck: Fixing Patient Flow for Better Care (and a Better Bottom Line) by Dr. Chris Strear and Danilo Sirias Bleacher Report: A Detailed List of an NFL Coach's Responsibility Walter A Shewhart, 1924, and the Hawthorne factory by M Best and D Neuhauser   TIMESTAMPS [00:20] Intro [04:39] Meet Trent Green [06:19] Key leadership positions in a healthcare organizations [07:52] Meet Steve Spear and his work in the healthcare industry [11:13] The early days of the operations [14:02] The major milestones from increasing distribution [20:42] Steve’s thoughts on an organization’s ability to adapt [24:42] The DevOps Enterprise Summit videos and journal [25:35] Continuation of Steve’s thoughts [26:56] The path of good ideas and barriers [32:04] Trent’s role at the vaccination site [36:15] The strategic level of planning [39:19] Two interviews with Dr. Patrick Cawley and Eroom's law [47:31] Gene’s firsthand observations at the vaccination site [54:40] Fast vs. slow integrated problem-solving styles [1:01:58] Lesson learned in the vaccination process [1:09:50] Uncovering constraints [1:22:25] Cost of change goes down, frequency of change goes up [1:25:46] Becoming an effective coach [1:30:19] Gene adds additional context [1:36:57] Contacting Trent Green [1:38:05] Outro
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    Patterns of Generative Cultures: How They Can Be Destroyed and the Importance of Trust with Dr. Ron Westrum

    1:43:19

    In the second part of this two-part episode of The Idealcast, Gene Kim continues his conversation with Dr. Ron Westrum, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Eastern Michigan University and creator of the Westrum organization typology model.    In part two of their conversation, Kim and Westrum talk about generative cultures and why Westrum thinks they are more important now than it they were a hundred years ago. Westrum also shares his observations on the increasing number of functional specialities in organizations. He discusses the challenges that arise from having matrixed organizations and the tools to overcome these challenges.    Finally, Westrum previews the new book he’s working on about information flow within organizations.   ABOUT THE GUEST Ron Westrum is Emeritus Professor of sociology at Eastern Michigan University. He holds a B.A. (honors) from Harvard University and a Ph.D in Sociology from the University of Chicago.   Dr. Westrum is a specialist in the sociology of science and technology, and on complex organizations. He has written three books, Complex Organizations: Growth, Development and Change; Technologies and Society: The Shaping of People and Things, and Sidewinder: Creative Missile Design at China Lake. He has also written about fifty articles and book chapters. His work on organizational culture has been valuable for the aviation industry and to medical safety, as well as to other areas of endeavor. He has been a consultant to NASA, the National Research Council, and the Resilience Core Group. He is currently at work on a book on information flow cultures.   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT Why Westrum thinks creating generative cultures is more important now than it was 100 years ago His observations on the increasing number of functional specialities and how long it’s been going on The challenges that arise from having matrix organizations and the tools to overcome these challenges The book he’s working on about information flow within organizations, what areas he’s pursuing and what has surprised him as he delves into specific examples   RESOURCES The Sociology and Typologies of Organizations, and Technical Maestros with Dr. Ron Westrum Sidewinder: Creative Missile Design at China Lake by Ron Westrum Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster The Citigroup Center (formerly Citicorp Center) Latent human error Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II by Arthur Herman Admiral Thomas Moore Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson Lying to Ourselves: Dishonesty in the Army Profession by Dr. Leonard Wong and Dr. Stephen J. Gerras The Generals: American Military Command from World War II to Today by Thomas E. Ricks The Inmates Are Running the Asylum: Why High Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity by Alan Cooper Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World by General Stanley A. McChrystal with Chris Fussell, David Silverman, Tantum Collins Hubble Space Telescope NOVA - Aircraft Carrier 21st Century Jet - Building the Boeing 777 Boeing to Buy McDonnell Douglas Extended-range Twin-engine Operations Performance Standards (ETOPS) Alan Mulally Technology in Retrospect and Critical Events in Science (TRACES) General George C. Marshall The Marshall Plan on NPR’s Planet Money 2015 State Of DevOps Report Westrum organizational culture The study of information flow: A personal journey by Ron Westrum Stand and Deliver Mayo Clinic How a Friendly Fire Tragedy in Sicily Transformed Airborne Warfare The New Heat On Ford Email Ron Westrum   TIMESTAMPS   [00:00] Intro [02:39] Why generative cultures are more important now [14:50] Exposing latent pathogens [19:39] Gene’s thoughts and a few corrections [28:59] The increase in silos [34:53] How Westrum would organize the organization [40:42] Why matrix organizations are fundamentally unstable and how to cope [44:57] LaunchDarkly and DevOps Enterprise Summit Virtual [46:47] Matrix organizations and how to help increase likelihood of success [57:26] Building the Boeing 777 [1:06:24] Where generative characteristics came from [1:11:10] Bridging the world of R&D to the world of operations [1:14:58] Team of Teams example [1:20:09] General George C. Marshall [1:24:35] Other mechanisms Westrum has seen in high performing teams [1:32:30] Westrum’s new book [1:38:53] What DevOps has helped Westrum [1:39:47] Contacting Admiral Richardson [1:41:36] Outro
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    The Sociology and Typologies of Organizations, and Technical Maestros with Dr. Ron Westrum

    1:49:51

    In the first part of this two-part episode of The Idealcast, Gene Kim speaks with Dr. Ron Westrum, Emeritus Professor of sociology at Eastern Michigan University. His work on organizational culture and his contribution of the Westrum organizational typology model have been instrumental in understanding what makes a high-performing organization across industries. For decades, he has studied complex organizations from medicine to aviation to the nuclear industry.   In part one of their conversation, Kim and Westrum talk about the stark contrast between NASA’s highly experimental culture of the Apollo space program versus the highly compliance-driven culture of the US Space Shuttle program, and Westrum’s opinions on how to bring that experimental culture back. They also discuss the origins of the Westrum organizational typology model and some of the insights that led to it. Finally, Westrum shares what organizations should do when things go wrong in complex systems.   ABOUT THE GUEST Dr. Ron Westrum is Emeritus Professor of sociology at Eastern Michigan University. He holds a B.A. (honors) from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Chicago.   Dr. Westrum is a specialist in the sociology of science and technology and complex organizations. He has written three books, Complex Organizations: Growth, Development and Change; Technologies and Society: The Shaping of People and Things, and Sidewinder: Creative Missile Design at China Lake. He has also written about fifty articles and book chapters. His work on organizational culture has been valuable for the aviation industry and to medical safety, as well as to other areas of endeavor. He has been a consultant to NASA, the National Research Council, and the Resilience Core Group. He is currently at work on a book on information flow cultures.   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT   Why much of the body of knowledge around safety culture came from sociology as opposed to psychology. How Westrum views the stark contrast in NASA between the highly experimental culture of the Apollo space program versus what has been characterized as a highly compliance-driven culture of the US Space Shuttle program. Insightful and useful opinions on what would be required to bring that experimental culture back in NASA. The origins of the Westrum organization typology model and some of the insights that led to it. Why Westrum views the notion of a technical maestro important to get the desired outcomes. What Westrum thinks should ideally happen when things go wrong in complex systems.   RESOURCES   State of DevOps Reports Westrum organizational culture The study of information flow: A personal journey by Ron Westrum Sidewinder: Creative Missile Design at China Lake by Ron Westrum Complex Organizations: Growth, Development and Change by Ron Westrum Normal Accidents: Living with High-Risk Technologies by Charles Perrow Crew resource management or cockpit resource management (CRM) The Human Factor in Aircraft Accidents by David Beaty Naked Pilot: The Human Factor in Aircraft Accidents by David Beaty United Airlines Flight 232 Cockpit Voice Recorder Database Captain Al Haynes' 1991 lecture at NASA Ames Research Center It's Your Ship: Management Techniques from the Best Damn Ship in the Navy by Michael Abrashoff Apollo 13 Space Shuttle Challenger disaster Space Shuttle Columbia disaster CBS News article: "Readdy says 'no rationale' for spy satellite inspection" Apollo 13 (1995) - Square Peg in a Round Hole Scene Health inequalities among British civil servants: the Whitehall II study by Jane Ferrie, Martin J Shipley, George Davey Smith, Stephen A Stansfeld and Michael G Marmot Facing Ambiguous Threats by Michael Roberto, Richard M.J. Bohmer, and Amy C. Edmondson DevOps Enterprise Summit Virtual Nasa Cut or Delayed Safety Spending by Stuart Diamond Mars Curiosity Rover Landing Space 2015 How Apple Is Organized for Innovation by Joel M. Podolny and Morten T. Hansen Arthur Squires The Tender Ship: Governmental Management of Technological Change by Arthur Squires Jacob Rabinow Federal Research and Development Expenditures and the National Economy: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Domestic and International Scientific Planning and Analysis of the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-fourth Congress, Second Session Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders by L. David Marquet Excellence in the Surface Navy by Gregg G. Gullickson Excellence in the Surface Navy by Gregg G. Gullickson, Richard D. Chenette and Reuben T. Harris How NASA Builds Teams: Mission Critical Soft Skills for Scientists, Engineers, and Project Teams by Charles J. Pellerin The Generals: American Military Command from World War II to Today by Thomas E. Ricks George C. Marshall: Four (4) Volumes - Education of a General, 1880-1939; Ordeal and Hope, 1939-1943; Organizer of Victory, 1943-1945; Statesman, 1945-1959 by Forrest C. Pogue Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World by General Stanley A. McChrystal with Chris Fussell, David Silverman, Tantum Collins Forge of Democracy by Neil MacNeil Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II by Arthur Herman Email Ron Westrum   TIMESTAMPS   [00:00] Intro [04:01] Meet Ron Westrum [07:19] Why prominent figures in the safety field come from sociology [08:38] Observations about the work on airline safety [11:17] How Ron’s work is relevant and why culture is important [16:56] Apollo 13 and Space Shuttle Columbia disaster [23:15] Westrum organization typology model [24:38] United Airlines Flight 232 [34:45] Understanding the dynamics of generative organizations [41:57] Three western typologies beyond the table [50:16] The Whitehall II study [53:05] What the word generative means to Ron [55:31] The two NASAs and how he would drive out fear [58:44] LaunchDarkly and DevOps Enterprise Summit Virtual [1:00:37] What Ron imagines would cause a different outcome as NASA [1:08:40] It matters who’s at the top [1:12:18] The technological maestro concept [1:16:38] How the technological maestro concept applies [1:26:20] How these characteristics can be learned [1:28:51] Building a community of good judgment [1:33:39] The role of CNO [1:35:27] How organizations learn and adapt generative capabilities [1:42:01] What should ideally happen when something goes wrong [1:45:41] Information flow, organization’s nervous system, and management [1:48:01] Contacting Admiral Richardson [1:49:06] Outro  
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    Leadership, Radical Delegation, And Integrated Problem Solving with Admiral John Richardson

    1:24:54

    In the second part of this two-part episode of The Idealcast Gene Kim and Admiral John Richardson, former Chief of Naval Operations, continue their discussion on the importance of leadership in large, complex organizations, especially enabling leadership training early in one’s career, and exploring why he views it as so important. Admiral Richardson also shares why radical delegation is needed more than ever, and provides tools and techniques for enabling it. Kim and Admiral Richardson discuss the important characteristics needed to integrate problems solving into an organization. And finally, they talk about the nature of the US Naval Reactors that are responsible for the safe and reliable operations of the US Naval Propulsion Program, why that warrants the command of a 4-star admiral, and what should ideally happen when accidents occur in complex systems. Also joining the conversation is Dr. Steve Spear, who has written extensively about the US Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program program in his book The High-Velocity Edge. ABOUT THE GUESTS Admiral John Richardson served as the Chief of Naval Operations for four years, which is the professional head of the US Navy. While in the Navy, Richardson served in the submarine force and commanded the attack submarine USS Honolulu in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for which he was awarded the Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale Inspirational Leadership Award. He also served as the Director of Naval Reactors, responsible for the design, safety, certification, operating standards, material control, maintenance, disposal, and regulatory oversight of over 100 nuclear power plants operating on nuclear-powered warships deployed around the world. Since his retirement in August 2019, he has joined the boards of several major corporations and other organizations, including Boeing, the world's largest aerospace company, and Exelon, a Fortune 100 company that operates the largest fleet of nuclear plants in America and delivers power to over 10 million customers.  Dr. Steve Spear (DBA MS MS) is principal for HVE LLC, the award-winning author of The High-Velocity Edge, and patent holder for the See to Solve Real Time Alert System. A Senior Lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School and a Senior Fellow at the Institute, Dr. Spear’s work focuses on accelerating learning dynamics within organizations so that they know better and faster what to do and how to do it. This has been informed and tested in practice in multiple industries including heavy industry, high tech design, biopharm R&D, healthcare delivery and other social services, US Army rapid equipping, and US Navy readiness.   Visit Steve Spear's Website   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT Admiral Richardson’s views on the importance of training leadership in the earliest stages of a sailor’s career Why leadership is so important Various tools and techniques for enabling radical delegation Important characteristics of the different ways that integrated problem solving incurs in organizations The nature of the function organization that is the U.S. Naval reactors, comprehensively responsible for safe and reliably operations of the US Naval Propulsion Program and why it warrants being commanded by a four-star admiral What should leaders in complex organizations do when accidents occur   RESOURCES Leadership Development and Balancing Creativity and Control with Admiral John Richardson (Part I) The Visual Display of Quantitative Information by Edward Tufte Navy Leader Development Framework A Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority v. 1 A Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority v. 2 Amazon Staff Meetings: “No Powerpoint” Amazon’s Jeff Bezos: The Ultimate Disrupter by Adam Lashinsky How are the six-page narratives structured in Jeff Bezos' S-Team meetings? Flipped meetings: Learning from Amazon’s meeting policy by Stowe Boyd The Visual Display of Quantitative Information by Edward Tufte Beautiful Evidence by Edward Tufte The High-Velocity Edge: How Market Leaders Leverage Operational Excellence to Beat the Competition by Steven J. Spear Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World by General Stanley A. McChrystal, Chris Fussell, David Silverman and Tantum Collins The Unicorn Project: A Novel about Developers, Digital Disruption, and Thriving in the Age of Data by Gene Kim Michael Nygard’s episodes on The Idealcast Part 1, summit presentations, and Part 2 Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman Thinking, Fast and Slow’s Wikipedia page The Idealcast episodes featuring David Silverman and Jessica Reif Part 1 and Part 2   TIMESTAMPS [00:00] Intro [01:24] Toughing up the training [09:37] Feedback from the fleet [11:00] Discussions with the instructors [14:03] A Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority [18:07] Designing for the next place [28:18] Reducing the cost of change [35:22] Configurations for failure or success [39:55] Tools for integration [47:39] How structure affects the dynamics of how organizations work [51:59] Gene reflects on integrated problem solving [57:28] Two domains of activities to use the slow communication paths [1:00:42] If these mental models resonate with Admiral Richardson [1:02:31] What point does the center get involved [1:07:47] Why the delegation for the nuclear reactor core is important [1:14:00] What happens when complex systems go wrong [1:20:37] Contacting Admiral Richardson
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    Leadership Development and Balancing Creativity and Control with Admiral John Richardson

    1:51:58

    In the first episode of Season 2 of The Idealcast, Gene Kim speaks with Admiral John Richardson, who served as Chief of Naval Operations for four years, the top officer in the Navy. Before that, Admiral Richardson served as director of the US Naval Reactors, which is comprehensively responsible for the safe and reliable operation of the US Navy’s Nuclear Propulsion program.   In part one of this two-part conversation, Kim and Admiral Richardson explore how the Department of Defense and the armed services can lead the way to respond effectively to the digital disruption agenda. Admiral Richardson discusses how he operationalized creating a high velocity learning dynamic across the entire US Navy. He also presents his theories on how we need to balance compliance and creativity. And finally, he presents some amazing examples of how to strip away the barnacles from processes, those layers of controls and supervision that may have crept in over the decades.   Also joining the conversation is Dr. Steve Spear, who has written extensively about the US Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program program in his book The High-Velocity Edge.   ABOUT THE GUESTS   Admiral John Richardson served as the Chief of Naval Operations for four years, which is the professional head of the US Navy. While in the Navy, Richardson served in the submarine force and commanded the attack submarine USS Honolulu in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for which he was awarded the Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale Inspirational Leadership Award. He also served as the Director of Naval Reactors, responsible for the design, safety, certification, operating standards, material control, maintenance, disposal, and regulatory oversight of over 100 nuclear power plants operating on nuclear-powered warships deployed around the world.   Since his retirement in August 2019, he has joined the boards of several major corporations and other organizations, including Boeing, the world's largest aerospace company, and Exelon, a Fortune 100 company that operates the largest fleet of nuclear plants in America and delivers power to over 10 million customers.    Dr. Steve Spear (DBA MS MS) is principal for HVE LLC, the award-winning author of The High-Velocity Edge, and patent holder for the See to Solve Real Time Alert System. A Senior Lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School and a Senior Fellow at the Institute, Dr. Spear’s work focuses on accelerating learning dynamics within organizations so that they know better and faster what to do and how to do it. This has been informed and tested in practice in multiple industries including heavy industry, high tech design, biopharm R&D, healthcare delivery and other social services, US Army rapid equipping, and US Navy readiness.   Visit Steve Spear's Website   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT Why high-velocity learning was so important to Admiral Richardson when he was the Chief of Naval Operations. How Admiral Richardson operationalized creating a high velocity learning dynamic across the entire US Navy. His views on the need to balance compliance and creativity. Specific advice on what leaders must do when the balance tilts too much toward compliance and has taken away people’s ability to unleash their full creative potential. Examples of how to strip away the barnacles from processes. Why radical delegations are so important. How Admiral Richardson came to believe that creating leadership communities and connections are essential. Where software competencies must show up in modern organizations.   RESOURCES Dr. Steve Spear’s episodes on The Idealcast Part 1, summit presentations, and Part 2. The High-Velocity Edge: How Market Leaders Leverage Operational Excellence to Beat the Competition by Steven J. Spear. The Boeing Company Exelon BWX Technologies, Inc. Marine Corps Doctrinal Publication 7 Tao Te Ching - Chapter 17 Marine Corps Doctrinal Publication 1 A Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority v. 1 A Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority v. 2 The Air Force's Digital Journey in 12 Parsecs or Less at DevOps Enterprise Summit Las Vegas 2020 Failure Is Not an Option by Gene Kranz Admiral Hyman G. Rickover and Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande Fingerspitzengefühl The Unicorn Project: A Novel about Developers, Digital Disruption, and Thriving in the Age of Data by Gene Kim 2021 DevOps Enterprise Summit Virtual - Europe The Shift: Creating a Culture of High Performance by Dr. Andre Martin The Key to High Performance: What the Data Says by Dr. Nicole Forsgren Dr. Andre Martin’s DevOps Enterprise Summit presentation: “The Shift: Creating a Culture of High Performance” by Dr. Andre Martin, VP People Development, Google Adrian Cockcroft on the Future of the Cloud Patton George S. Patton slapping incidents The Generals: American Military Command from World War II to Today by Thomas E. Ricks Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World by General Stanley A. McChrystal, Chris Fussell, David Silverman and Tantum Collins Navy Leader Development Framework Tombstone   TIMESTAMPS   [00:00] Intro [01:54] Meet Admiral John Richardson [04:00] Responding effectively to the digital disruption agenda [07:05] Admiral Richardson in his own words and his Act 2 [08:27] Meet Steve Spear [09:29] How Steve’s work caught Admiral Richardson’s attention [11:46] Admiral Richardson’s efforts to create a learning dynamic [19:18] A Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority [27:01] What he does with leader who’s afraid of the concept [28:48] Contrasts between learning culture and compliance culture [37:37] Fingerspitzengefühl [41:03] Steve’s thoughts on compliance vs creativity [43:47] Leadership development and compliance control [48:38] Addressing near misses [56:29] DevOps Enterprise Summit 2021 in Europe [57:52] Scar tissue processes [1:01:22] Finding a balance with leaders [1:09:43] The story behind general Eisenhower and General Patton [1:14:02] The three layers of creativity [1:27:23] How technology changed a sense of community [1:33:30] Admiral Richardson’s working relationships in the Navy [1:42:19] Where the software capabilities need to show up [1:48:02] Navy Leader Development Framework Version 3.0 [1:51:22] Outro
  • The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution podcast

    The Rise of Knowledge Work, and its Structure and Dynamics with Jeffrey Fredrick

    1:51:44

    In the final episode of the first season of The Idealcast, Gene Kim sits down with Jeffrey Fredrick, coauthor of Agile Conversations, to synthesize and reflect upon some of the major themes from the entire season.  In Gene’s continued quest to understand why organizations behave the way they do, Fredrick helps connect the dots and points to new areas that deserve more study. They discuss the nature of knowledge work, including how software creation requires so much more conversation and joint cognitive work, and the challenges this presents. They also dive into the bodies of knowledge that are required as we push more decision making and value creation to the edges of the organization.  Then, Gene and Fredrick revisit the concept of integration and why it’s so much more important now than 50 years ago. And finally, they discuss why “Are you happy?” and “Are you proud of your work?” are two very powerful questions and what they actually reveal about people and the work they’re performing. And why this is all so important as we try to create organizations that maximize learning for everyone. BIO: Jeffrey Fredrick is an internationally recognized expert in software development with over 25 years’ experience covering both sides of the business/technology divide. His experience includes roles as Vice President of Product Management, Vice President of Engineering, and Chief Evangelist. He has also worked as an independent consultant on topics including corporate strategy, product management, marketing, and interaction design. Jeffrey is based in London and is currently Managing Director of TIM, an Acuris Company. He also runs the London Organisational Learning Meetup and is a CTO mentor through CTO Craft.   Twitter: https://twitter.com/Jtf  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jfredrick/ Website: https://www.conversationaltransformation.com/   YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT The nature of knowledge work and how it requires more conversation and joint cognitive work and the challenges it presents The body of knowledge required in decision making and value creation for the organization Concepts of integration and why it’s important now What the questions, “Are you happy?” and “Are you proud of your work?,” reveal about people and their work How Dr. Thomas Kuhns’s work pertains to management models RESOURCES Agile Conversations: Transform Your Conversations, Transform Your Culture by Douglas Squirrel and Jeffrey Fredrick Continuous Integration and Testing Conference (CITCON) The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Dr. Thomas Kuhn A Collection of Unmitigated Pedantry (ACOUP) The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni Dr. Steve Spear’s episode on The Idealcast Dr. Steve Spear’s 2020 DevOps Enterprise Summit Talk Michael Nygard’s episode on The Idealcast MIT’s Beer Game Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman The DevOps Enterprise Journal Reinventing Organizations by Frederic Laloux Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling High-Tech Products to Mainstream Customers by Geoffrey A. Moore Command in War by Martin van Creveld Continuous Deployment at IMVU: Doing the impossible fifty times a day by Timothy Fitz Sooner Safer Happier: Antipatterns and Patterns for Business Agility by Jonathan Smart   TIMESTAMPS   [00:11] Intro [03:13] Meet Jeffrey Fredrick [03:54] Why conversations are important [08:03] Why conversations are more important now than 100 years ago [11:02] The Five Dysfunctions of a Team [13:08] Integration [16:33] The need for better integration now [20:18] What is information hiding and why it’s important [26:32] The pace of change moves the trade-off [31:41] Two important questions to ask [42:17] The system of fast and slow [48:25] Selection bias [51:07] Thank you from Gene [52:13] Jeffrey’s significant a-ha moment [59:45] Injecting change [1:06:24] Structure and dynamics [1:12:44] Command in War [1:23:39] Complaining about a feature factory [1:25:40] Standardized work and integrating feedback [1:22:21] Two elements of information flow [1:36:49] Insights on peer programming [1:43:54] Learning more and learning earlier [1:45:55] Is there something missing? [1:48:50] Contacting Jeffrey Fredrick [1:49:55] Outro

Descobre o mundo dos podcasts com a app gratuita GetPodcast.

Subscreve os teus podcasts preferidos, ouve episódios offline e obtém recomendações fantásticas.

iOS buttonAndroid button