Mayo Clinic Talks podcast

Nutritional Supplements Edition: Family Medicine Case Studies

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To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Nutritional Supplement Edition

Guests:

Andrew R. Jagim, Ph.D.

Jakob R. Erickson, D.O.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

The care of athletes often requires special knowledge that many healthcare providers are less familiar with.  Athletes may have somewhat unique health problems related to their endurance or strength training.  They may also be taking a variety of nutritional supplements which could cause health issues.  This case-based podcast covers a couple different examples of health issues experienced by athletes. Featured guests include Andrew R. Jagim, Ph.D. and Jacob R. Erickson, D.O. from Sports Medicine at Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss some of the medical issues often faced by athletes.

Specific topics:

  • Iron-deficiency anemia
  • Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport
  • Vitamin D deficiency and hypervitaminosis D

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

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