Letters From Home podcast

Letters From Home

St. Paul Center

The St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology is a non-profit research and educational institute that promotes life-transforming Scripture study in the Catholic tradition.

50 Episódios

  • Letters From Home podcast

    Seeing the Son of David: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

    3:01

    Readings: Jeremiah 31:7–9 Psalm 126:1–6 Hebrews 5:1–6 Mark 10:46–52 Today’s Gospel turns on an irony—it is a blind man, Bartimaeus, who becomes the first person outside of the Apostles to recognize Jesus as the Messiah. And his healing is the last miracle Jesus performs before entering the holy city of Jerusalem for His last week on earth. The scene on the road to Jerusalem evokes the joyful procession prophesied by Jeremiah in today’s First Reading. In Jesus this prophecy is fulfilled. God, through the Messiah, is delivering His people from exile, bringing them back from the ends of the earth, with the blind and lame in their midst. Jesus, as Bartimaeus proclaims, is the long-awaited Son promised to David (see 2 Samuel 7:12–16; Isaiah 11:9; Jeremiah 23:5). Upon His triumphal arrival in Jerusalem, all will see that the everlasting kingdom of David has come (see Mark 11:9–10). As we hear in today’s Epistle, the Son of David was expected to be the Son of God (see Psalm 2:7). He was to be a priest-king like Melchizedek (see Psalm 110:4), who offered bread and wine to God Most High at the dawn of salvation history (see Genesis 14:18–20). Bartimaeus is a symbol of his people, the captive Zion of whom we sing in today’s Psalm. His God has done great things for him. All his life has been sown in tears and weeping. Now, he reaps a new life. Bartimaeus, too, should be a sign for us. How often Christ passes us by—in the person of the poor, in the distressing guise of a troublesome family member or burdensome associate (see Matthew 25:31–46)—and yet we don’t see Him. Christ still calls to us through His Church, as Jesus sent His Apostles to call Bartimaeus. Yet how often are we found to be listening instead to the voices of the crowd, not hearing the words of His Church. Today He asks us what He asks Bartimaeus: “What do you want me to do for you?” Rejoicing, let us ask the same thing of Him—what can we do for all that He has done for us?
  • Letters From Home podcast

    Mirando al Hijo de David: Scott Hahn reflexiona sobre el 30º Domingo de Tiempo Ordinario

    3:01

    Lecturas: Jeremías 31, 7-9 Salmo 126, 1-6 Hebreos 5, 1-6 Marcos 10, 46-52 El evangelio de hoy es irónico. Un ciego, Bartimeo, es el primero en reconocer a Jesús como Mesías (aparte de los apóstoles). Su sanación es el último milagro que hace Cristo antes de entrar en la ciudad santa de Jerusalén, en la última semana de su vida en la tierra. La escena en el camino a Jerusalén evoca la procesión gozosa profetizada por Jeremías en la primera lectura de hoy. La profecía se cumple en Cristo. Dios, por medio de su Mesías, libera a su pueblo del exilio, trayéndolo desde los confines de la tierra, con los ciegos y cojos andando entre los demás. Jesús, como Bartimeo proclama, es el tan esperado Hijo prometido a David (2S 7, 12-16; Is 11, 1; Je 23, 5). Cuando entre triunfalmente en Jerusalén, todos reconocerán que el reino eterno de David ha llegado (Mc 11, 9-10). Como escuchamos en la epístola de hoy, se esperaba que el Hijo de David fuera Hijo de Dios (cfr. Sal 2,7). Él estaba destinado a ser un sacerdote-rey, como Melquisedec (Sal 110, 4), quien ofreció pan y vino al Dios Altísimo en los albores de la historia de salvación (Gn 14, 18-20). Bartimeo es símbolo de su gente, el pueblo cautivo de Sión, sobre el que cantamos en el salmo de hoy. Su Dios ha hecho grandes cosas por él. Toda su existencia había sido sembrada de lágrimas y llanto; ahora cosecha una nueva vida. Bartimeo también debería ser un signo para nosotros. ¡Cuántas veces Cristo pasa delante nuestro en la persona del pobre, o disfrazado de miembro problemático de la familia o de compañero difícil (cfr. Mt 25, 31-46), y no lo vemos! Cristo sigue llamándonos a través de su Iglesia, como llamó a Bartimeo por medio de sus apóstoles. Sin embargo, ¡cuántas veces nos halla escuchando a la muchedumbre y no a las enseñanzas de su Iglesia! Hoy nos pregunta como a Bartimeo, “¿Que quieres que te haga?”. Con alegría, preguntémosle igualmente: “¿Qué quieres que hagamos en gratitud por todo lo que has hecho por nosotros?”.
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  • Letters From Home podcast

    Life According to the Spirit by Clement Harrold

    13:46

    The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Saturday of the Twenty-fourth Week of Ordinary Time by Mr. Clement Harrold. Ordinary Weekday / Optional Memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary / John of Capistrano, Priest First Reading: Romans 8: 1-11 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 24: 1b-2, 3-4ab, 5-6 Alleluia: Ezekiel 33: 11 Gospel: Luke 13: 1-9 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com
  • Letters From Home podcast

    Why You Should Commit to Christ by Dr. John Bergsma

    11:34

    The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Friday of the Twenty-ninth Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. John Bergsma. Ordinary Weekday / St. John Paul II, Pope First Reading: Romans 7: 18-25a Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 119: 66, 68, 76, 77, 93, 94 Alleluia: Matthew 11: 25 Gospel: Luke 12: 54-59 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com  
  • Letters From Home podcast

    Jesus Brings Division? by Rory Mitrik

    8:45

    The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Thursday of the Twenty-ninth Week of Ordinary Time by Mr. Rory Mitrik. First Reading: Romans 6: 19-23 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 1: 1-2, 3, 4 and 6 Alleluia: Philippians 3: 8-9 Gospel: Luke 12: 49-53 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com
  • Letters From Home podcast

    Why You Don't Have an Excuse to Sin by Dr. John Bergsma

    9:55

    The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Wednesday of the Twenty-ninth Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. John Bergsma. Ordinary Weekday / Paul of the Cross, Priest, Religious Founder First Reading: Romans 6: 12-18 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 124: 1b-3, 4-6, 7-8 Alleluia: Matthew 24: 42a, 44 Gospel: Luke 12: 39-48 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com
  • Letters From Home podcast

    Welcoming Death with Joy by Mr. Rob Corzine

    17:58

    The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of Isaac Jogues and John de Brébeuf and Companions by Mr. Rob Corzine. Isaac Jogues and John de Brébeuf, Psalms, religious, missioneries, Martyrs, & Companions, Martyrs Obligatory Memorial First Reading: Romans 5: 12, 15b, 17-19, 20b-21 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 40: 7-8a, 8b-9, 10, 17 Alleluia: Luke 21: 36 Gospel: Luke 12: 35-38 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com
  • Letters From Home podcast

    The Gift of Friendship is a Grace of Salvation by Dr. Scott Hahn

    10:01

    The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Feast of St. Luke by Dr. Scott Hahn. Luke, Evangelist Feast First Reading: Second Timothy 4: 10-17b Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 145: 10-11, 12-13, 17-18 Alleluia: John 15: 16 Gospel: Luke 10: 1-9 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com
  • Letters From Home podcast

    Cup of Salvation: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

    3:01

    Readings: Isaiah 53:10-11 Psalm 33:4-5,18-20,22 Hebrews 4:14-16 Mark 10:35-45 The sons of Zebedee hardly know what they’re asking in today’s Gospel. They are thinking in terms of how the Gentiles rule, of royal privileges and honors. But the road to Christ’s kingdom is by way of His cross. To share in His glory, we must be willing to drink the cup that He drinks. The cup is an Old Testament image for God’s judgment. The wicked would be made to drink this cup in punishment for their sins (see Psalm 75:9; Jeremiah 25:15, 28; Isaiah 51:17). But Jesus has come to drink this cup on behalf of all humanity. He has come to be baptized—which means plunged or immersed—into the sufferings we all deserve for our sins (compare Luke 12:50). In this He will fulfill the task of Isaiah’s suffering servant, whom we read about in today’s First Reading. Like Isaiah’s servant, the Son of Man will give His life as an offering for sin, as once Israel’s priests offered sacrifices for the sins of the people (see Leviticus 5:17–19). Jesus is the heavenly high priest of all humanity, as we hear in today’s Epistle. Israel’s high priests offered the blood of goats and calves in the temple sanctuary. But Jesus entered the heavenly sanctuary with His own blood (see Hebrews 9:12). And by bearing our guilt and offering His life to do the will of God, Jesus ransomed “the many”—paying the price to redeem humanity from spiritual slavery to sin and death. He has delivered us from death, as we rejoice in today’s Psalm. We need to hold fast to our confession of faith, as today’s Epistle exhorts us. We must look upon our trials and sufferings as our portion of the cup He promised to those who believe in Him (see Colossians 1:24). We must remember that we have been baptized into His passion and death (see Romans 6:3). In confidence, let us approach the altar today, the throne of grace, at which we drink the cup of His saving blood (see Mark 14:23–24).
  • Letters From Home podcast

    El Cáliz de la Salvación: Scott Hahn reflexiona sobre el 29º Domingo de Tiempo Ordinario

    3:01

    Lecturas: Isaías 53, 10-11 Salmo 33:4-5,18-20,22 Hebreos 4, 14-16 Marcos 10, 35-45 En el Evangelio que se nos presenta hoy, los hijos de Zebedeo no saben lo que están pidiendo. Su forma de pensar evoca el modo en que los gentiles gobiernan, con privilegios reales y honores. Pero el camino al reino de Cristo es por la vía de su cruz. Para compartir su gloria, hemos de estar dispuestos a tomar de la copa de la que El bebe. La copa (o “cáliz”) es una imagen que, en el Antiguo Testamento, se refiere al juicio de Dios. Los malvados tendrían que tomar de ella en castigo por sus pecados (cfr. Sal 75, 9; Jer 25, 15.28; Is 51.17). Pero Jesús ha venido a tomar esta copa en favor de toda la humanidad. Ha venido a ser bautizado—es decir, decir meterse o sumergirse—en los sufrimientos que hemos merecido por nuestros pecados (cfr. Lc 12, 50). De este modo cumplirá la misión prefigurada por el Siervo Sufriente de Isaías, de quien leemos en la primera lectura de este domingo. Como el Siervo de Isaías, el Hijo de Hombre dará su vida en ofrenda por el pecado, así como los sacerdotes de Israel ofrecieron sacrificios por los pecados del pueblo (Lv 5, 17-19). Jesus es el Sumo Sacerdote celestial de toda la humanidad, como dice en la epístola de este domingo. Los Sumos Sacerdotes de Israel ofrecieron la sangre de cabritos y terneros en el santuario del Templo. Pero Jesús entró en el santuario del cielo con su propia Sangre (cfr. Hb 9, 12). Y al cargar con nuestra culpa y ofrecer su vida para cumplir la voluntad de Dios, Jesús rescato “a muchos”, pagando el precio de la redención de la humanidad, liberándola de la esclavitud espiritual del pecado y a la muerte. El nos ha librado de la muerte, como decimos con gozo en el salmo de hoy. Debemos permanecer firmes en la profesión de nuestra fe, como nos exhorta la epístola de esta misa. Hemos de ver nuestras pruebas y sufrimientos como la parte que nos toca de la copa que Cristo prometió a los que creen en Él (cfr. Col 1, 24). Tenemos que recordar que hemos sido bautizados en su Pasión y Muerte (cfr. Ro 6, 3).

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