Talks from the Hoover Institution podcast

Hoover Book Club: Victor Davis Hanson On ”The Dying Citizen: How Progressive Elites, Tribalism, And Globalization Are Destroying The Idea Of America”

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Thursday, October 7, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University  

Join the Hoover Book Club for engaging discussions with leading authors on the hottest policy issues of the day. Hoover scholars explore the latest books that delve into some of the most vexing policy issues facing the United States and the world. Find out what makes these authors tick and how they think we should approach our most difficult challenges.

In this first meeting, watch a discussion with Hoover Senior Fellow Victor Davis Hanson on his latest book, The Dying Citizen: How Progressive Elites, Tribalism, and Globalization Are Destroying the Idea of America, moderated by Bill Whalen on Thursday, October 7th at 10AM PT.

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    How to Tackle a Fifty-Year-Old Myth? Kennedy, Lodge, and the Diem Coup

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    Friday, January 21, 2022 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   The Diem Coup, in November 1963, resulted in the overthrow and assassination of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem. The coup caused great instability and led to the deployment of the first U.S. Marines to the beaches of Danang in March 1965, paving the way for full-blown American military involvement in Vietnam. The history of the coup, including the leading role of U.S. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., was established through the dramatic leak of the Pentagon Papers in 1971. After more than 50 interviews with Lodge’s former colleagues, Luke Nichter began to challenge the coup’s conventional history, ultimately uncovering a secret recording of Kennedy and Lodge from August 15, 1963, transcribed and made public for the first time, which shifts our understanding of the coup’s origin. Luke A. Nichter is a Professor of History and James H. Cavanaugh Endowed Chair in Presidential Studies at Chapman University. His area of specialty is the Cold War, the modern presidency, and U.S. political and diplomatic history, with a focus on the "long 1960s" from John F. Kennedy through Watergate. He is a noted expert on Richard Nixon's 3,432 hours of secret White House tapes, and a New York Times bestselling author or editor of seven books, the most recent of which is The Last Brahmin: Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. and the Making of the Cold War.  Luke’s next book project, under contract with Yale University Press, is tentatively titled The Making of the President, 1968: Lyndon Johnson, Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon, George Wallace, and the Election that Changed America, for which he was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for 2020-2021. The book draws on interviews with approximately 85 family members and former staffers, in addition to extensive archival research involving first-time access to a number of key collections that will recast our understanding of the 1968 election. ABOUT THE PROGRAM This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.
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    Hoover Book Club: Stephen Haber On ”The Battle over Patents: History and Politics of Innovation”

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    Monday, December 6, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University Join the Hoover Book Club for engaging discussions with leading authors on the hottest policy issues of the day. Hoover scholars explore the latest books that delve into some of the most vexing policy issues facing the United States and the world. Find out what makes these authors tick and how they think we should approach our most difficult challenges.  In our latest installment, watch a discussion with Stephen Haber who is the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and an editor of The Battle over Patents: History and Politics of Innovation.  Stephen is joined by contributors; Alexander Galetovic (Hoover Research Fellow) and Gerardo Con Diaz (former Hoover National Fellow). A discussion with Stephen Haber on his latest book, The Battle over Patents: History and Politics of Innovation moderated by Bill Whalen on Monday, December 6 at 10AM PT/1:00PM ET.
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    Slave Prices in New York and New Jersey

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    Friday, December 3, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   Michael Douma will be sharing a chapter from his new book on the cultural and economic history of Dutch slavery in New York. There is a long-established view that slavery in New York was neither efficient nor profitable, or perhaps only marginally profitable in its early years. And yet for two hundred years New Yorkers paid to acquire slaves to be put to labor for profit, not just to serve as household decoration. There were some 22,000 slaves in New York across the 18th century who could speak Dutch. Using novel archeological, bills of sale, newspaper, and probate records, the chapter demonstrates that slavery was a long-term investment in New York and that the prices of slaves remained stable over the long run. Michael Douma is assistant research professor at Georgetown University, where he serves as the Director of the Georgetown Institute for the Study of Markets and Ethics. His research focuses on 19th century US history, the Dutch world, and the philosophy and methods of history. He is the author of The Colonization of Freed African Americans in Suriname, Veneklasen Brick: The Liberal Approach to the Past, and Creative Historical Writing. ABOUT THE PROGRAM This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.
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    The Last King Of America: The Misunderstood Reign Of George III

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    Wednesday, December 1, 2021 Hauck Auditorium | Hoover Institution, Stanford University   The Hoover Institution hosts The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 from 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM PT in Hauck Auditorium, at the Hoover Institution. Please join the Hoover Institution's Working Group on the Role of Military History in Contemporary Conflict for a talk with Andrew Roberts, author of The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III. The discussion is hosted by Hoover Senior Fellow, Victor Davis Hanson. Please RSVP by November 29, 2021. Most Americans dismiss George III as a buffoon: a heartless and terrible monarch with few, if any, redeeming qualities (picture the preening, spitting, and pompous version in Hamilton). But in 2017, the Queen of England put 200,000 pages of the Georgian kings’ private papers online, about half of which related to George III, and these papers have forced a full-scale reinterpretation of the king’s life and reign. Roberts, an award-winning investigative historian (Churchill, Napoleon), had unprecedented access to these archives. The result is the first biography of King George III in fifty years, and the definitive one for our generation. The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III will reverse this maligned monarch’s reputation, showing that George III was in fact a wise, humane, and even enlightened monarch who was beset by talented enemies, debilitating mental illness, incompetent ministers, and disastrous luck. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Andrew Roberts is the bestselling author of Churchill: Walking with Destiny; Leadership in War The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War; Masters and Commanders: How Four Titans Won the War in the West, 1941-1945; Waterloo: Napoleon's Last Gamble; and Napoleon: A Life, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for biography and a finalist for the Plutarch Award. He has won many other prizes, including the Wolfson History Prize and the British Army Military Book of the Year. He is the Roger and Martha Mertz Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, a Lehrman Institute Distinguished Fellow at the New-York Historical Society, and a visiting professor in the Department of War Studies at King's College, London. Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; his focus is classics and military history. Hanson was a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1992–93), a visiting professor of classics at Stanford University (1991–92), the annual Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Visiting Fellow in History at Hillsdale College (2004–), the Visiting Shifron Professor of Military History at the US Naval Academy (2002–3),and the William Simon Visiting Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University (2010).
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    Women’s Rights In Taliban-Controlled Afghanistan

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    Thursday, November 18, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   Senator Joni Ernst in conversation with Ayaan Hirsi Ali on Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 1:00 PM ET. ABOUT THE SPEAKERS Senator Joni Ernst is the first woman to serve in federal elected office from the State of Iowa and is also the first female combat veteran elected to serve in the United States Senate. Having served 23 years in the military, Senator Ernst has dedicated her life to her state and country and is known for her independent leadership. Senator Ernst is a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee. Ayaan Hirsi Ali is a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and founder of the AHA Foundation. She served as a Member of the Dutch Parliament from 2003 to 2006. While in Parliament, she focused on furthering the integration of non-Western immigrants into Dutch society, and on defending the rights of Muslim women. Her latest book, Prey: Immigration, Islam, and the Erosion of Women's Rights, is available on Amazon.
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    Hoover Book Club: Herbert Lin On ”Cyber Threats and Nuclear Weapons”

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    Thursday, November 18, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   Join the Hoover Book Club for engaging discussions with leading authors on the hottest policy issues of the day. Hoover scholars explore the latest books that delve into some of the most vexing policy issues facing the United States and the world. Find out what makes these authors tick and how they think we should approach our most difficult challenges. In the second meeting, watch a discussion with Hoover Fellow Herbert Lin on his latest book, Cyber Threats and Nuclear Weapons, moderated by Bill Whalen on Thursday, November 18th at 10AM PT/1:00PM ET. Please join us at the Hoover DC office or watch our Livestream.
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    Hoover Book Club: Victor Davis Hanson On ”The Dying Citizen: How Progressive Elites, Tribalism, And Globalization Are Destroying The Idea Of America”

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    Thursday, October 7, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   Join the Hoover Book Club for engaging discussions with leading authors on the hottest policy issues of the day. Hoover scholars explore the latest books that delve into some of the most vexing policy issues facing the United States and the world. Find out what makes these authors tick and how they think we should approach our most difficult challenges. In this first meeting, watch a discussion with Hoover Senior Fellow Victor Davis Hanson on his latest book, The Dying Citizen: How Progressive Elites, Tribalism, and Globalization Are Destroying the Idea of America, moderated by Bill Whalen on Thursday, October 7th at 10AM PT.
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    Not One Inch: America, Russia, and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate

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    Friday, November 12, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   Not one inch. With these words, Secretary of State James Baker proposed a hypothetical bargain to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev after the fall of the Berlin Wall: if you give up your part of Germany, NATO will “not shift one inch eastward.” Controversy erupted almost immediately over this 1990 exchange—but more important was the decade to come, when the words took on new meaning. Gorbachev let his Germany go, but Washington rethought the bargain, not least after the Soviet Union’s own collapse in December 1991. Washington realized it could not just win big but win bigger. Their new approach: Not one inch of territory need be off limits to NATO.  On the thirtieth anniversary of the Soviet collapse, Sarotte uses new evidence and interviews to show how, in the decade that culminated in Vladimir Putin’s rise to power, the United States and Russia undermined a potentially lasting partnership. Not One Inchshows what went wrong.  Please click here to read the introduction to Prof. Sarotte's new book. An expert in the history of international relations, Mary Sarotte is the Kravis Distinguished Professor at Hopkins-SAIS, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and visiting faculty at Harvard’s Center for European Studies.  She is the author, among other books, of The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall and 1989: The Struggle to Create Post-Cold War Europe, both of which were selected as Financial Times Books of the Year, among other distinctions and awards. In the past, she has worked as a journalist at The Economist and Die Zeit, served as a White House Fellow, and held fellowships with the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton.    Norman Naimark is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Robert and Florence McDonnell professor of East European History at Stanford. His current research focuses on Soviet policies and actions in Europe after World War II and on genocide and ethnic cleansing in the twentieth century. ABOUT THE PROGRAM This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.
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    The Jewish World of Alexander Hamilton

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    Monday, October 25, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   In The Jewish World of Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Porwancher debunks a string of myths about the origins of this founding father to arrive at a startling conclusion: Hamilton, in all likelihood, was born and raised Jewish. For more than two centuries, his youth in the Caribbean has remained shrouded in mystery. Hamilton himself wanted it that way, and most biographers have simply assumed he had a Christian boyhood. With a detective’s persistence and a historian’s rigor, Porwancher upends that assumption and explores the revolutionary implications of his findings for making sense of the American founding. Andrew Porwancher serves as the Wick Cary Associate Professor of Constitutional Studies at the University of Oklahoma and an Ernest May Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center. His most recent book is The Jewish World of Alexander Hamilton. His prior books include The Devil Himself: A Tale of Honor, Insanity, and the Birth of Modern America, which was adapted for the stage in Dublin.  He previously served as the Horne Fellow at Oxford and the Garwood Fellow at Princeton. ABOUT THE PROGRAM This talk is part of the History Working Group Seminar Series. A central piece of the History Working Group is the seminar series, which is hosted in partnership with the Hoover Library & Archives. The seminar series was launched in the fall of 2019, and thus far has included six talks from Hoover research fellows, visiting scholars, and Stanford faculty. The seminars provide outside experts with an opportunity to present their research and receive feedback on their work. While the lunch seminars have grown in reputation, they have been purposefully kept small in order to ensure that the discussion retains a good seminar atmosphere.
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    Has School Accountability Outlived Its Shelf Life?

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    Wednesday, October 20, 2021 Hoover Institution, Stanford University   One of the earliest casualties of the COVID-related school closures was school accountability for academic results, and many education leaders want it to stay that way.  How do we assure families, students and communities that their schools are fully serving their role?  What options are possible and which are politically infeasible? The Hoover Education Success Initiative (HESI) hosts Has school accountability outlived its shelf life? on Wednesday, October 20, 2021 at 1PM PT. FEATURED PANELISTS Michael Kirst, Stanford University, Panelist: Dr. Kirst is Professor Emeritus of Education and Business Administration (by courtesy) at Stanford.  He is the longest-serving President of California’s State Board of Education, having served four terms from 1975 to 1982 and again from 2011 to 2019. Checker Finn, Hoover Education Success Initiative (HESI), Panelist: Dr. Finn is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and member of HESI’s Steering Committee.  He is President Emeritus of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, and served as a member of the Maryland State Board of Education. Secretary James Peyser, State of Massachusetts, Panelist: Secretary Peyser directs the Executive Office of Education in Massachusetts, which oversees early childhood education, K-12, and higher education.  He is Governor Charlie Baker’s most senior education advisor.  He chaired the MA Board of Education from 1999 to 2006. MODERATED BY Melanie Barton, Office of Governor McMaster, Moderator: Melanie Barton is senior educator advisor to the Governor of South Carolina.  Previously, she served as Executive Director of the South Carolina Education Oversight Committee, an independent nonpartisan committee comprised of education, civic, and business leaders. The Hoover Education Success Initiative (HESI) focuses on providing state leaders with sound research-based recommendations to improve education in America.

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