Heterodox Out Loud podcast

Heterodox Out Loud

Heterodox Academy

Heterodox Out Loud is an ongoing series of the best of Heterodox Academy's blog in audio format. Listen to insightful, thought-provoking pieces authored by the HxA community by adding the Heterodox Out Loud podcast to your lineup.

29 Episódios

  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 29: Curiosity U, John Tomasi

    49:58

    Today’s episode is all about the purpose of higher education. We sit down with Heterodox Academy’s first president, John Tomasi, to discuss the future of university life and a new value that he thinks should guide us forward. Before joining HxA, John was Romeo Elton 1843 Professor of Natural Theology at Brown University.John’s blog: “Curiosity U.”Let us know what you think! For comments and questions email [email protected] episode was hosted by Zach Rausch, and produced by Davies Content.
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 28: University Professors After the U.S. Capitol Riot: Good Intentions and Disastrous Ends, Martha McCaughey and Scott Welsh

    27:55

    This episode—released one year after the U.S. Capitol Riot—examines the role of the “scholar-activist” and how their good intentions may unintentionally lead to disastrous ends. We sit down and discuss these topics with Appalachian State University professors: Martha McCaughey, Professor of Sociology, and Scott Welsh, Associate Professor of Communication.Martha and Scott’s blog: “University Professors After the U.S. Capitol Riot: When Becoming Part of the Solution Is Part of the Problem.”Let us know what you think! For comments and questions email [email protected]This episode was hosted by Zach Rausch, and produced by Davies Content.
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

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    Episode 27: A Heterodox Holiday Special with Jonathan Haidt, Erec Smith, David Diener, & Angel Parham

    27:28

    We’re living in difficult times. Our nation is increasingly polarized and our campuses are plagued with distrust and fear. As we move into 2022, we share three blogs that we hope will inspire, ease divisions, and cultivate a sense of wonder and humility. Today’s episode includes Jonathan Haidt’s essay, “True Diversity Requires Generosity of Spirit,” Erec Smith’s “A Rhetoric of Common Values,” and a new essay by Angel Parham and David Diener, “How Our Fraught History Can Still be the Source of Unity.”This episode was hosted by Zach Rausch. For comments and questions email [email protected]
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 26: Asymmetries in the Culture War, Christian Alejandro Gonzalez

    20:22

    Today’s episode examines how we treat our ideological adversaries and how responses to them often come down to a numbers game. We sit down with Christian Gonzalez, a Ph.D. student in political theory at Georgetown University and a Writing Fellow at Heterodox Academy, to discuss a disturbing story about power, human nature, and public discourse.Christian’s Blog: On Social Power Dynamics in Political DiscourseFor comments and questions email [email protected] episode was hosted by Zach Rausch. The artwork was inspired by Christian’s piece and was created by Lexi Polokoff. You can follow her on Instagram @lexipolokoffart
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 25: How Critics of Intersectionality (Often) Miss The Point, Ian Storey

    24:56

    Are certain ideas inherently dangerous—and when can we reasonably separate a set of ideas from the aggressive tactics of those who push them forward?This week on the Heterodox Out Loud podcast, we’re sitting down with Ian Storey, an associate fellow at the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College, to explore these important questions, especially as they relate to modern conversations around Intersectionality, deplatforming, social media, and the path toward civility in public discourse. Ian’s Blog: How Critics of Intersectionality (Often) Miss The PointFor comments and questions email [email protected] episode was hosted by Zach Rausch. The artwork was inspired by Ian’s piece and was created by Lexi Polokoff. You can follow her on Instagram @lexipolokoffart
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 24: Restoring Civil Discourse in Higher Education, Pano Kanelos

    27:21

    Today’s episode features Pano Kanelos, a university president on a mission to restore civil discourse in higher education. We’ll learn how the campus life he loved so deeply began changing for the worse. Tune in for a conversation about moral leadership, civil discourse, the future of the university, and a radical idea that may upend everything. Pano’s Blog: The Importance of Learning to Argue From Ancient Greece Through the PresentFor comments and questions email [email protected] episode was hosted by Zach Rausch. The artwork was inspired by Kanelos’ piece and was created by Lexi Polokoff. You can follow her on Instagram @lexipolokoffart
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 23: What the ‘Free Speech’ Debate is Still Missing, Ilana Redstone

    24:03

    Today’s episode is about how voices become silenced and when to determine if a free speech crisis exists. We’ll hear the story of Ilana Redstone, a professor who argues that we must go beyond the surface and look at subtle forms of censorship and suppression that exist within higher education. Our topics include free speech, the covid-19 pandemic, and bias in the classroom.Ilana’s Blog: What the ‘Free Speech’ Debate is Still Missing To engage deeper with these ideas, check out HxA’s Open Inquiry Resource Guide.For comments and questions email [email protected] episode was hosted by Zach Rausch. The artwork was inspired by Redstone’s piece and was created by Lexi Polokoff. You can follow her on Instagram @lexipolokoffart
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 22: Why Bad Things Happen: Covid and Health Inequality, Michael Jindra

    21:45

    This episode is about how we explain why bad things happen. We hear the story of Michael Jindra, a cultural anthropologist who challenges the common narrative around health disparities in the United States. Our topics include free will, systemic racism, and personal responsibility.Michael’s blog: Covid, Health Inequality and the Avoidance of Behavioral Explanations.To engage deeper with these ideas, check out our related posts:Politics, Evolution, and Gender: A Heterodox Firestorm and Lessons Learned by Glenn GeherEducation is Related to Greater Ideological Prejudice by Sean StevensScience Fictions: How Fraud, Bias, Negligence, and Hype Undermine the Search for Truth by Musa al-GharbiFor comments and questions email [email protected] episode was hosted by Zach Rausch. The artwork was inspired by Jindra’s piece and was created by Lexi Polokoff. You can follow her on Instagram @lexipolokoffart
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 21: On The Constitution of Knowledge, Jonathan Rauch

    453244:11:48

    On this episode of Heterodox Out Loud, we venture into the mind of James Madison, one of the most insightful political thinkers in American history. We learn how his wisdom can help solve many of the issues facing higher education.  The blog, “Heterodox Academicians, Make Madison Your Model” was written by Jonathan Rauch, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. He’s the author of eight books including his most recent, The Constitution of Knowledge: A Defense of Truth.  As mentioned in today’s episode: On September 21st, we will be hosting a riveting discussion on disinformation, conformist culture, and the loss of trust in our epistemic institutions with Jonathan Rauch and Jonathan Haidt. You can learn more about the event here.For comments and questions email [email protected] episode was hosted by Zach Rausch. The artwork was inspired by Rauch’s piece and was created by Lexi Polokoff. You can follow her on Instagram @lexipolokoffart
  • Heterodox Out Loud podcast

    Episode 20: Mill Still Matters Today: Free Speech in the 21st Century, Richard Reeves

    25:04

    With rising concerns around COVID-19 misinformation, election fraud claims, hate speech online and on-campus, many argue that traditional arguments for free speech are no longer sustainable. Today’s blog, Mill Still Matters Today, is a defense of the values of John Stuart Mill — the most influential English language philosopher of the 19th century. His robust defense of personal liberty and free speech is a subject of fruitful debate today. The blog was written by Richard Reeves, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and one of the world’s foremost scholars on John Stuart Mill. The episode includes an exclusive interview with Richard. As mentioned in today’s episode: On October 13th, we will be hosting a riveting panel event, “Hyperconnected: Knowledge Production in the Age of Social Media.” Join us! To engage deeper with these ideas, check out our related posts: Why Free Speech? by Jonathan Zimmerman Why Mill Matters More Than Ever: A Student Perspective by Noah Rosenfield Heterodox Academicians, Make Madison Your Model by Jonathan Rauch This episode was hosted by Zach Rausch. The artwork was inspired by Reeves’ piece and was created by Lexi Polokoff. You can follow her on Instagram @lexipolokoffart

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