National Gallery of Art | Talks podkast

The 70th A. W. Mellon Lectures: Contact: Art and the Pull of Print, Part 3: Separation

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Messages, meanings, movements—how does art history help us understand our world? Join curators, historians, artists, musicians and filmmakers as they explore art and its histories in a search for our shared humanity. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned.

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