Image Culture podcast

EP 035: Dan Thawley, EIC of A Magazine Curated By

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This week I’m sharing a conversation with Dan Thawley, Editor in Chief of A Magazine Curated By. The magazine is unique in the landscape of fashion publications. The project was started in 2004 with the concept that each issue would be guest curated by a fashion designer, who would be given free rein over the content of the magazine.

“Each issue celebrates a designer’s ethos: their people, passion, stories, emotions, fascinations, spontaneity, and authenticity.”

The magazine presents an opportunity for designers to get beyond just fashion, and show the broader context of their work. The reader is invited to see the world of collaborators, references, and inspirations that contribute to a designer’s perspective. We get to understand the unique point of view of each designer who curates an issue, and, as you get to the final pages, you realize that you’ve had a truly intimate experience.

I’m talking to Dan on the occasion of the release of A Magazine Curated By’s 21st issue, curated by Lucie and Luke Meier, the creative directors of fashion house Jil Sander. In our conversation Dan and I talk about his 10+ year history with the magazine, how he became Editor in Chief when he was just 20 years old, and the process behind the scenes of working with the designers. Over the years, Dan has developed a unique perspective on how visual culture influences clothing design.

A Magazine Curated By has a great website where you can get a peak into iconic past issues with designers such as Martin Margiela, Thom Browne, Yohji Yamamoto, Simone Rocha, Jun Takahashi and many more. You can find this archive at amagazinecuratedby.com or on Instagram @amagazinecuratedby

Dan Thawley is on Instagram @danthawley

I want to thank Dan Thawley, and the whole team at A Magazine Curated By, as well as the Lucie and Luke Meier for putting together such a beautiful, timely issue.

Get your copy of A Magazine Curated By Issue No 21 online at amagazinecuratedby.com .

Our show is produced by Sarah Levine and our music is by Jack and Eliza. Find us on Instagram @image.culture or @william.jess.laird

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    EP 035: Dan Thawley, EIC of A Magazine Curated By

    53:13

    This week I’m sharing a conversation with Dan Thawley, Editor in Chief of A Magazine Curated By. The magazine is unique in the landscape of fashion publications. The project was started in 2004 with the concept that each issue would be guest curated by a fashion designer, who would be given free rein over the content of the magazine.“Each issue celebrates a designer’s ethos: their people, passion, stories, emotions, fascinations, spontaneity, and authenticity.”The magazine presents an opportunity for designers to get beyond just fashion, and show the broader context of their work. The reader is invited to see the world of collaborators, references, and inspirations that contribute to a designer’s perspective. We get to understand the unique point of view of each designer who curates an issue, and, as you get to the final pages, you realize that you’ve had a truly intimate experience.I’m talking to Dan on the occasion of the release of A Magazine Curated By’s 21st issue, curated by Lucie and Luke Meier, the creative directors of fashion house Jil Sander. In our conversation Dan and I talk about his 10+ year history with the magazine, how he became Editor in Chief when he was just 20 years old, and the process behind the scenes of working with the designers. Over the years, Dan has developed a unique perspective on how visual culture influences clothing design.A Magazine Curated By has a great website where you can get a peak into iconic past issues with designers such as Martin Margiela, Thom Browne, Yohji Yamamoto, Simone Rocha, Jun Takahashi and many more. You can find this archive at amagazinecuratedby.com or on Instagram @amagazinecuratedbyDan Thawley is on Instagram @danthawleyI want to thank Dan Thawley, and the whole team at A Magazine Curated By, as well as the Lucie and Luke Meier for putting together such a beautiful, timely issue.Get your copy of A Magazine Curated By Issue No 21 online at amagazinecuratedby.com .Our show is produced by Sarah Levine and our music is by Jack and Eliza. Find us on Instagram @image.culture or @william.jess.laird
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