The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

AR Reads: Cedric Price

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With the publication of our Collage + AR New into Old issue, we return to an essay by Douglas Murphy on Cedric Price, published as part of an issue on adaptive reuse, picking up on the ideas of adaptability, indeterminacy, and progress that underlie Price’s work. 

The AR New into Old awards celebrate the creative ways buildings are adapted and remodelled to welcome contemporary uses. This year, we will be hosting the winner of the 2021 awards, ZAV architects, in an online event celebrating their project Farsh Film Studio, and discussing adaptive reuse as a type of architectural intervention. The event is on 19 July and will be free to attend – register here: https://www.architectural-review.com/events/join-us-in-conversation-with-zav-architects-on-19-july

Altri episodi di "The Architectural Review Podcast"

  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Ecologies: planting trees

    36:59

    In the first episode of the AR Ecologies series, the ecological silver bullet of planting trees is put under scrutiny. From Amazonia to London, planting and its colonial history is unravelled by different voices, including photographer Sebastião Salgado, scientist Suzanne Simard, research director at human rights organisation Survival International Fiona Watson, architect Paulo Tavares and engineer Maria Smith. Hosted by Sabrina Syed. AR Ecologies, a podcast by The Architectural Review, explores the tension between architecture and ecology through critical positions. Instead of standalone interviews, each episode weaves curious and critical voices together to meet, discuss and give space to perspectives outside an architectural orbit. The first series revolves around trees, an audio counterpart to the AR October 2021 issue, available now.
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    AR Reads: In praise of darkness

    14:53

    This episode features In praise of darkness, a waning reserve by Sigri Sandberg, published in AR April 2020. We chose to revisit this piece, which we published as the keynote for the Darkness issue nearly 18 months ago, as this week we mark the launch of our Light issue. With the Darkness issue we explored how darkness is a critical resource that is increasingly endangered, where shadows can be sites of subversion in a culture of ever-increasing surveillance. With our September 2021 issue, we flip the switch to consider access to light as a right that is unevenly distributed, continuing political questions of visibility and invisibility, and exploring connections between light and safety, between energy and technology. Find out more about the Light issue here: https://www.architectural-review.com/magazines/ar-september-2021-light 
  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

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  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Reads: Can early acclaim be the kiss of death?

    16:01

    This episode features a piece by Peter Buchanan which asks whether early acclaim for an architect can be a handicap – or even the kiss of death? We’re revisiting this piece now as our July/August issue features the work of Enric Miralles (1955 - 2000) in our Reputations column, who, as a believer in designing through making, left a vast archive of drawings and models. This essay looks at the architects once heralded as rising stars who have seen their work descend into caricature and recycled motifs. The original piece can be read here: https://www.architectural-review.com/architects/emerging-architects/can-early-acclaim-for-an-architect-be-a-handicap-even-the-kiss-of-death 
  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Reads: Cedric Price

    11:29

    With the publication of our Collage + AR New into Old issue, we return to an essay by Douglas Murphy on Cedric Price, published as part of an issue on adaptive reuse, picking up on the ideas of adaptability, indeterminacy, and progress that underlie Price’s work.  The AR New into Old awards celebrate the creative ways buildings are adapted and remodelled to welcome contemporary uses. This year, we will be hosting the winner of the 2021 awards, ZAV architects, in an online event celebrating their project Farsh Film Studio, and discussing adaptive reuse as a type of architectural intervention. The event is on 19 July and will be free to attend – register here: https://www.architectural-review.com/events/join-us-in-conversation-with-zav-architects-on-19-july
  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Reads: Make do and mend

    9:47

    This episode features an essay by Carlos Quintáns called Make do and mend, published in AR December 2019/January 2020 issue on Preservation. The essay looks at how practices of persistent upkeep in Burkina Faso are themselves a piece of heritage that must be maintained. We’re revisiting this piece now as we publish our June issue on Waste where we confront the life cycles of materials, objects and spaces.
  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Reads: A losing game

    16:11

    Harnessing failure: on this Earth Day, we have chosen to revisit this essay Keller Easterling wrote for our Failure issue, published in February 2019, about the catastrophic failures of our contemporary world, from climate crisis to financial crashes to the apparent inability of global infrastructures of space to adequately accommodate refugees. In the face of such failure at such scale, Easterling sets forth a question of new possible ecologies to make use of a broken system.
  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Reads: Housing the dead

    15:54

    Published in AR November 2016, Housing the dead, by Ken Warpole is about the environmental, economic and cultural factors that have shaped funerary architecture throughout the ages. Following on from the publication of our April 2021 issue on the underground, this piece burrows into the underground as not something that is hollow and empty – infinitely filled and extracted from, but a site full of stories, meaning and imaginaries. In the AR underground issue, Phineas Harper explore alternative funerary practices at Soulton Long Barrow in Shropshire, accompanied with poetry by Merlin Fulcher. The following piece looks at how we make space for the dead and the architectural legacy of the grave.
  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Reads: The Invisible Women

    12:23

    How female architects were erased from history: published in AR March 2017, The Invisible Women by Eva Álvarez and Carlos Gómez traces how architectural discourse and history has favoured the sole (male) starchitect, erasing collaborative realities and the work of women as it does so. As part of this year’s W Awards, celebrating exceptional work by women in architecture, we will host a full week of digital events starting on Monday 8 March, including conversations between Kate Macintosh and Yasmeen Lari, and Lesley Lokko and Beatriz Colomina, as well as architects shortlisted for both the Moira Gemmill Prize for Emerging Architecture and the MJ Long Prize for Excellence in Practice. To join the conversation, book your ticket today
  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Reads: Cuba‘s urban farming revolution

    8:37

    Havana’s unique agricultural infrastructure emerged from punishing trade sanctions following the fall of the USSR but today provides an exemplary precedent that could be applied worldwide. This episode of AR Reads features Cuba’s urban farming revolution: how to create self-sufficient cities by Carey Clouse, published in AR March 2014.  AR Reads is a podcast by The Architectural Review, bringing you a piece from our vast archive, read out loud for you to enjoy.
  • The Architectural Review Podcast podcast

    AR Reads: Sylvia Crowe

    10:24

    The British landscape architect of the Modern garden, Sylvia Crowe is known for the gardens of the Commonwealth Institute in London, the Rutland Water reservoir in East Anglia, and texts such as Garden Design and Tomorrow’s Landscape. This episode of AR Reads features our Reputations on Crowe by Jonathan Glancey Also referenced in the text is Timothy Brittain-Catlin’s Outrage on the betrayal of the Commonwealth Institute, the Crowe-designed landscape of which was destroyed to make way for OMA’s additions next to what is now London’s Design Museum AR Reads is a podcast by The Architectural Review, bringing you a piece from our vast archive, read out loud for you to enjoy.

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