World Business Report podcast

World Business Report

BBC World Service

The latest business and finance news from around the world from the BBC

48 épisodes

  • World Business Report podcast

    Update: Stock markets reach to US jobs report

    11:14

    Chris Low from FHN Financial gives us the latest on the stock markets. Plus, we hear from the CEO of Visa about how the pandemic moved us away from cash at a faster rate.
  • World Business Report podcast

    Shell pulls out of Cambo oil field development

    26:30

    Shell has pulled out of the controversial Cambo oil field development west of Shetland. The oil giant said that developing the field was uneconomical, and we get the background to the decision from Jane Rangal, who is an oil and gas analyst with Energy Aspects. Also in the programme, the US economy added a weaker than expected 210,000 jobs in November. The BBC's Michelle Fleury talks us through the latest data, and Mike Johnson reports on what's been described as the Great Resignation, where people are quitting their jobs in record numbers, and asks whether it is a permanent change in how we think about work. Plus, a new $6bn high speed rail link has opened between China and the capital of Laos, Vientiane. Ruth Banomyong is professor of logistics at Thammasat Business School in Bangkok, and discusses the implications.
  • World Business Report podcast

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  • World Business Report podcast

    Update: US seeks to block tech merger

    11:37

    America's trade watchdog wants to stop the merger of two electronic chip companies, Nvidia and ARM. Also, the Council of Global Unions - which represent over 200 million workers around the world - is renewing its demand that patents on the various coronavirus vaccines should be waived by the companies that have produced them.
  • World Business Report podcast

    WTA suspends China tennis tournaments

    26:00

    Amid concern about tennis player Peng Shuai, the WTA has suspended its China tennis events. We explore the financial implications with Dr Dan Plumley, lecturer in sport finance at Sheffield Hallam University. Also in the programme, 20 years on from the collapse of the US energy giant Enron, the BBC's Lesley Curwen considers whether lessons have been learned from the fall of a corporate giant. Plus, the Omicron variant of coronavirus is causing concern for some companies about whether to proceed with Christmas party plans. We find out more from Alex Hewitt, chief executive of AOK Events, which plans parties for corporate clients. Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Gareth Barlow, Nisha Patel, Philippa Goodrich and Vishala Sri-Pathma. (Picture: Peng Shuai. Picture credit: EPA.)
  • World Business Report podcast

    Update: President Biden vows to ease supply chain problems in time for holidays

    7:07

    President Biden sought to reassure Americans that the current disruption in the supply chain is being tackled head-on. Sylvan Lane of The Hill in Washington DC explains the impact the disruptions could have on the economy. Its also been a turbulent day on the US markets. Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago explains.
  • World Business Report podcast

    EU outlines Global Gateway plans

    26:29

    The European Union has launched a global investment scheme to rival China's Belt and Road. We find out more about the Global Gateway project from Jonathan Holslag, professor in international politics at the Free University of Brussels. Also in the programme, the International Energy Agency has observed a record level of renewable power added to electricity grids around the world this year. Heymi Bahar is senior analyst at the IEA in Paris, and tells us which countries are outperforming the rest. The BBC's Adrienne Murray reports on Denmark's hopes for so-called green hydrogen as a means of meeting its climate goals. Plus, the Economist Intelligence Unit has published its latest global cost of living survey, and found Tel Aviv in Israel to be the world's most expensive city. We find out more from Dahlia Scheindlin, who lives in Tel Aviv, where she's an analyst at the independent think tank, Century International. Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and Faarea Masud.
  • World Business Report podcast

    Update: Inflation fears worry US markets

    16:42

    The Chairman of the US Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell, has said that the rise in Covid-19 cases and the emergence of the Omicron variant poses risks to employment and economic activity and increased uncertainty for inflation - we get analysis from Joe Saluzzi from Themis Trading in New Jersey. Plus, high street fashion giant Inditex has appointed the founder's daughter as its new chair. The firm owns brands including Zara and Massimo Dutti, and we find out what's behind the appointment of Marta Ortega from Dan Dombey of the Financial Times in Madrid. Also in the programme, authoritarian regimes are thought to be working closer than ever to keep each other afloat, with plenty of help from the West's financial system. We hear from Frank Vogl, who helped found the global anti-corruption organisation Transparency International. And we get wider context from the historian, journalist and author, Anne Applebaum. Plus, scientists have struggled for a long time to learn as much as they'd like about the world of infrasonic sound. These acoustic waves can travel a really long way but as they're below the range of human hearing you need to be able to place sensors where you can pick up various sources of infrasound. Now a team of research collaborators from the US, the UK, South Africa and the Netherlands has cracked it - use a seabird to do your recording for you. We hear from Olivier den Ouden at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute.
  • World Business Report podcast

    Inditex: Zara founder's daughter takes over

    26:28

    High street fashion giant Inditex has appointed the founder's daughter as its new chair. The firm owns brands including Zara and Massimo Dutti, and we find out what's behind the appointment of Marta Ortega from fashion journalist Charley Ross. The news comes a day after the company's expansion plans in France were blocked over a probe into whether Inditex benefits from the use of forced labour of Uyghurs in China. Inditex insists it does not, and we get the background from Clare Bailey, who is an industry consultant, specialising in clothing company supply chains. Also in the programme, authoritarian regimes are thought to be working closer than ever to keep each other afloat, with plenty of help from the West's financial system. We hear from Frank Vogl, who helped found the global anti-corruption organisation Transparency International. And we get wider context from the historian, journalist and author, Anne Applebaum. Plus, a dispute has broken out over the role of the ukulele in children's music education. Is it a good thing that more kids are picking up the simple stringed instrument, or is it to the detriment of more sophisticated music skills such as learning the guitar? Andy Eastwood is one of the few professional ukulele players in the UK, and gives us his perspective, and we find out more from Lincoln Abbott, executive director of the ABRSM, which runs music exams in the UK, and issued the report on the rise of the ukulele.
  • World Business Report podcast

    Update: Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey steps down as CEO

    7:20

    Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey is stepping down as chief executive of the company. Mr Dorsey, who co-founded Twitter in 2006 will be replaced by the current chief technical officer, Parag Agrawal. We ask the Financial Times correspondent Dave Lee why Mr Dorsey has given up the top job. Plus, Peter Jankovskis from Arbor Financial Services also brings us the latest news from the US markets.
  • World Business Report podcast

    Countries shut borders over Omicron variant fears

    26:27

    More countries including Japan have closed their borders over Omicron Covid variant fears. We explore to what extent travel restrictions can prevent the spread of viruses with Keith Neal, emeritus professor of epidemiology and infectious diseases at the University of Nottingham. And we get a sense of the likely economic impact of restrictions on South Africa from George Glynos, who is head of research at ETM Analytics. Also in the programme, we hear about the global semiconductor shortage and its impact on carmakers from Makoto Uchida, chief executive of Nissan. An episode of cartoon The Simpsons which refers to Tiananmen Square does not appear on the Disney+ video streaming platform in Hong Kong. Tom Grundy is editor in chief of the Hong Kong Free Press and explains the background. Plus, labour shortages plaguing many companies around the world appear to extend all the way to the North Pole. The BBC's Samira Hussain in New York reports on a shortage of Santas this festive season.

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