Radio Davos podcast

Olympics, soccer - sport and racism

0:00
26:28
Reculer de 15 secondes
Avancer de 15 secondes

Racist reactions at Euro 2020, possible protests at the Tokyo Games, in this episode we ask whether sport unites us, or reveals the deepest and darkest divisions in society.


Interviews: Business psychologist John Amaechi; sociology professor and author on racism and sport, Lori L. Martin; Olympic and Tour de France cyclist Nic Dlamini

D'autres épisodes de "Radio Davos"

  • Radio Davos podcast

    COP26: success or failure?

    24:12

    Was the Glasgow summit just the same old ‘blah, blah, blah’ or will it help us avoid climate catastrophe? Journalist Justin Worland covered COP26 for TIME and tells us his view on what was - and what was not - achieved.
  • Radio Davos podcast

    Top-10 emerging technologies

    39:47

    What are the breakthrough technologies that will transform our world in the next few years? Scientific American and the World Economic Forum present their annual top-ten emerging tech report. The two people who led the work -Mariette DiChristina, Dean of the College of Communication at Boston University, and Bernie Meyerson, Chief Innovation Officer Emeritus at IBM - talk to Radio Davos host Robin Pomeroy and Sophie Bushwick, Technology Editor at Scientific American. Read more here: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2021/11/these-are-the-top-10-emerging-technologies-of-2021
  • Radio Davos podcast

    Ne ratez aucun épisode de Radio Davos et abonnez-vous gratuitement à ce podcast dans l'application GetPodcast.

    iOS buttonAndroid button
  • Radio Davos podcast

    COP26: How cities are tackling pollution, congestion and the climate

    26:52

    The main greenhouse gas causing climate change is carbon dioxide - a colourless, odourless gas that is otherwise harmless to our health. But emissions of CO2 are often accompanied by other, toxic gases. So can we tackle air pollution - which kills 7 million people a year around the world - at the same time as we fight climate change? We hear from three cities - Buenos Aires, London and Singapore, that are doing just that by managing road transport to cut emissions.
  • Radio Davos podcast

    COP26: Climate change and the other global crisis - nature loss

    29:04

    The destruction of the natural world is the ‘other’ global environmental crisis, but it is entwined with climate change. Global warming is the number-one cause of that destruction, and the loss of forests and other ‘carbon sinks’ is increasing the pace of climate change. At COP26, world leaders agreed to  halt and reverse deforestation and land degradation by the end of the decade, pledging  $19 billion in public and private funds. Among the countries to sign up were  Brazil, Indonesia and Democratic Republic of Congo, which collectively account for 85% of the world’s forests. In this episode we speak to Tabi Joda, a forester in Cameroon who is helping plant the Great Green Wall - reforesting a strip right across the southern edge of the Sahara desert. We hear from Natura, a major cosmetics company on how businesses can make money from forests without destroying them, and Elizabeth Mrema, the head of the UN’s biodiversity convention - the person driving global efforts to protect nature - on a new plan to get companies to report on their impact on the natural world.
  • Radio Davos podcast

    COP26: First Movers Coalition

    21:51

    US climate envoy John Kerry and World Economic Forum President Brende Borge launched an initiative at COP26 to bring big companies and customers together to build demand for green products that require major investment and innovation. This episode has some highlights from the event which can be seen in full here: https://www.weforum.org/events/forum-cop26-live-2021/sessions/first-movers-coalition-launch
  • Radio Davos podcast

    COP26: The Great Melt - tales from the front lines of climate change

    30:07

    As COP26 opens, Radio Davos hears from a journalist who has covered dozens of UN climate gatherings and has reported on how global warming is affecting the remotest corners of the world. Alister Doyle’s book The Great Melt: Accounts from the Frontline of Climate Change takes us from a dangerously melting ice sheet in the Antarctic to a town high in the Andes threatened by floods from glacial meltwaters. And we hear how Anders Celsius didn’t only invent the temperature scale by which we measure global warming, he also made big strides in the way we understand sea-level rise.
  • Radio Davos podcast

    COP26: what to expect from the climate change summit

    36:16

    What is COP26, why is it important, and what should we expect? With guest co-host Gideon Lichfield, the global editor in chief of Wired, we look at the key issues at the Glasgow climate summit where world leaders need to show how we can achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions and avert climate catastrophe. Includes an interview with veteran climate campaigner Jennifer Morgan, the Greenpeace chief who has been to every single COP.
  • Radio Davos podcast

    Energy and climate change, with IEA chief Fatih Birol

    30:06

    In this COP26 special, we look at the immense challenge of making energy carbon-neutral. As the International Energy Agency records a surge in coal use and record jump in greenhouse gas emissions, its head, Fatih Birol, tells us what he wants from the climate summit. And the CEO of UK electricity market disruptor Octopus Energy says data will be the key to switching to renewables. Plus a view on COP26 and climate change from young Peruvian @InesYabar.
  • Radio Davos podcast

    COP26: Feed the world without destroying the climate

    23:59

    Food accounts for one-third of greenhouse gas emissions, so how can we make it sustainable? We talk to the author of Eating to Extinction about the risks of relying on a handful of food types, and learn how restaurants could play a big role in getting us to eat our greens. Guests: Dan Saladino, author of Eating to Extinction; Michael Oshman, founder and CEO of the Green Restaurants Association.
  • Radio Davos podcast

    COP26: The Ocean - why our seas hold the key to tackling climate change

    32:30

    Ahead of the COP26 climate summit, endurance swimmer Lewis Pugh takes us into icy - but warming - Arctic waters; UN envoy Peter Thomson calls on world leaders to act urgently to protect the ocean. And we head to the swamps of Colombia to find out  why coastal ecosystems - mangroves, seagrasses and saltmarshes - are powerful allies in the fight against global warming.

Découvrez le meilleur des podcasts sur l'application GetPodcast.

Abonnez-vous à tous vos podcasts préférés, écoutez les épisodes sans connexion internet et recevez des recommandations de podcasts passionnants.

iOS buttonAndroid button