What's Up with Docs Podcast podcast

Episode 32 - Mirjam Wiekenkamp - "Abusey Junction"

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n this episode, I speak with the publicist and one of the founders of NOISE Film PR, Mirjam Wiekenkamp. During our conversation, we get into her publicist origin story, some of the differences between PR firms in the US and Europe, the unique ways a publicist can position documentary films in the European documentary festival landscape, and how publicist and impact producers can often build upon and support one another’s work on behalf of a filmmaker. Mirjam and NOISE Film PR are representing several films at DOKLeipzig and IDFA that are part of the Steps’ Generation Africa program. To celebrate these young filmmakers from the Continent, this week’s song is Kokoroko’s “Abusey Junction.” KOKOROKO (meaning 'be strong' in Urhobo), are a collective of young musicians brought together by a love for Afrobeat led by trumpeter Sheila Maurice-Grey. They specialize in a soul-shaking, horn fuelled sound with West African roots and inner London hues. “Abusey Junction” is a ballad written by guitarist Oscar Jerome. It was written on the roof of a compound in Gambia where the band spent time last year immersing themselves in the soundscapes of the region.

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    Episode 32 - Mirjam Wiekenkamp - "Abusey Junction"

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    n this episode, I speak with the publicist and one of the founders of NOISE Film PR, Mirjam Wiekenkamp. During our conversation, we get into her publicist origin story, some of the differences between PR firms in the US and Europe, the unique ways a publicist can position documentary films in the European documentary festival landscape, and how publicist and impact producers can often build upon and support one another’s work on behalf of a filmmaker. Mirjam and NOISE Film PR are representing several films at DOKLeipzig and IDFA that are part of the Steps’ Generation Africa program. To celebrate these young filmmakers from the Continent, this week’s song is Kokoroko’s “Abusey Junction.” KOKOROKO (meaning 'be strong' in Urhobo), are a collective of young musicians brought together by a love for Afrobeat led by trumpeter Sheila Maurice-Grey. They specialize in a soul-shaking, horn fuelled sound with West African roots and inner London hues. “Abusey Junction” is a ballad written by guitarist Oscar Jerome. It was written on the roof of a compound in Gambia where the band spent time last year immersing themselves in the soundscapes of the region.
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