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#50 Warren Haynes (Allman Brothers) 1992 Interview

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A never-before-published interview with guitarist Warren Haynes from 1992.

In the interview, Haynes talks about:

  • Moving out of Duane Allman's shadow
  • How it feels to play Duane's licks
  • Whether Duane was an influence
  • His connection to Memphis and Motown
  • Going to see concerts when he was a kid
  • The musical differences between him and Duane
  • His love for fusion rock and what it did for his playing
  • The difference between his playing and Dickey Betts’ playing on lead and slide
  • How his older brothers introduced him to jazz and blues
  • What jazz player he would recommend to a young guitar player
  • Whether he had any formal music training
  • His experience with country singer David Allan Coe
  • What he learned from country musicians
  • Some advice for younger guitar players
  • The Allman Brothers latest record
  • The pleasure of recording live
  • The coincidence that happened 21 years earlier
  • A breakdown of whether it’s him or Betts soloing
  • The similarities between him and Betts and Coltrane and Cannonball Adderly
  • How Duane ended up using a slide on Dreams
  • Whether he enjoys playing rhythm as much as lead
  • Who's a good rhythm player?
  • The Les Paul he uses
  • His Soldano amps
  • What, if any, effects he uses in the studio recording
  • How things are going with the band
  • Whether tension in a band leads to better playing
  • If he sees The Allman Brothers continuing
  • The similarities in the Allmans’ fan base and the Grateful Dead’s fan base
  • Their next live album


In this episode, we have The Allman Brothers Band guitarist Warren Haynes. At the time of this interview in 1992, Haynes was 32 years old and was promoting the album An Evening with the Allman Brothers Band: First Set. In the interview, Haynes talks about the similarities and differences with Duane Allman and whether he sees The Allman Brothers Band continuing. He also takes a deep dive into their current live album and he offers advice for young guitar players.




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