Stories of Scotland podcast

Queer as Folktales Part 3: The Laird o the Loch

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Young fisher Mairi will do anything to return the sealskin to her almost-beloved selkie. The only problem is a few terrifying monsters stand in the way. In this final episode of a three-part miniseries, Annie and Jenny of Stories of Scotland Podcast retell classic Scottish mythology with a queer twist. Join Mairi on her journey into love & lore. Funded by the Edwin Morgan Trust Second Life Award, Queer as Folktales is a lighthearted look at how traditional folklore can be reimagined to incorporate the LGBT+ community of the Scottish Highlands and Islands. Listen to episodes in order for the tale to make sense.

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