All Things Iceland podcast

All Things Iceland

Jewells Chambers

Discover Iceland’s language, history, culture, & nature

107 épisodes

  • All Things Iceland podcast

    5 Trailblazing Women in Iceland’s History

    37:39

    While there are certainly more than five trailblazing women in Iceland’s history, I thought it would be helpful to start off with these women first because they have made a significant impact on Iceland and the progression of the society for everyone. You might have heard of some of the  women I’m featuring but there are others that you have probably never learned about. Before I jump into speaking about each woman, I will first give a bit of history about Iceland regarding suffrage and the significant impact that Icelandic women’s organizations had in the country. These organizations were formed before women had the right to vote. After going over each of the phenomenal women’s backgrounds, I share a little timeline of significant moments in Icelandic history that are related to women rights and equal rights. Next is the random fact of the episode and I will end off with the Icelandic word of the day. I found a lot of information on the Women’s history Archives website. The Archives was founded in January of 1975 by Anna Sigurðardóttir, Else Mia Einarsdóttir and Svanlaug Baldursdóttir. Since 1996 it has been a special entity within the National Library of Iceland. There is so much information there and I will have links to the website in the show notes if you want to check it out. A Short History of Voting Rights in Iceland I think it is important and super fascinating to share some history about Iceland and how the country being governed by Denmark played a significant role in the rights of women in the country. At the beginning of the 19th century Iceland did not have many people residing in the country. The ones that did live here were farmers, their wives and kids, people who worked as laborers and maids. There was not a middle class until later into the 20th century. That is significant because it is often thought that the middle class are the backbone of social movements. In fact from 1845, the right to vote for men in Iceland was limited to those of a certain age that paid taxes and had property.That changed in 1903 but still that means that more than 50 years went by where only men with certain status in society had the right to vote. What is so interesting to me is that the Icelandic parliament discussed women’s suffrage more than once in the 19th century and most parliamentarians supported it. However, all bills that contained women’s suffrage were vetoed by Danish authorities. Those bills also proposed changes in the relationship between countries as well. I’m sure that had a lot to do with the bills being vetoed. I was surprised at how progressive parliament was back about this topic. And for those who are not aware, Iceland didn’t become a sovereign state until 1918 and declared independence in 1944. The role of Women’s Organizations in Icelandic history Iceland’s first women’s organization was founded in the countryside in 1869. It’s focus was to foster more unity and cooperation among women in the region. They also collected money to buy a knitting machine that all members could use.Most women’s organizations at the time were focused on helping the sick and the poor. Iceland didn’t have a national healthcare system then and municipalities were barely providing any social help. By stepping in to help, these women organizations played a significant role in shaping the welfare state of the country. These organizations provided home care for the sick and created a healthcare center in Reykjavik.Because women were only allowed to get the most elementary education from the established institutions at the time, Icelandic women decided to create their own private schools between 1874 and 1879.Icelandic women gained the parliamentary vote in 1915, but the right was, however, blemished by the fact that only women over 40 years of age got the vote. Nowhere else in the world was women's suffrage restricted in this particular way. Certain circumstances in Iceland contributed to this unique decision,
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    The Challenges of Being a Female Artist in the Icelandic Music Industry

    44:41

    Ragna Kjartansdóttir (Cell7) and Hildur Kristín Stefánsdóttir are the dynamic duo that makes up the band Red Riot in Iceland. During this interview, they share the ups and downs of being an artist (solo and in a band) in Iceland. In particular, they provide insight as females in the Icelandic music industry and some of the challenges they have faced just due to their gender. Use my special link below to get a discounted rate of the live stream of the "Live from Reykjavík" concert happening on November 6th, 2021. This hybrid event has limited in-person seats and will be live-streamed from four iconic venues in Reykjavík. Amazing Icelandic artists like Ásgeir, Bríet, Aron Can, Daughters of Reykjavík, Red Riot, and more will perform. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xPoY_aXbhU Topics I Talked About With Red Riot During the Interview When did you burst onto the music scene in Iceland? Was there any pressure to look or be a certain way as a female artist? Which music artists have inspired you? Trailblazing as songwriters in Iceland Challenges they have faced in the music industry What advice do you have for young artists? What made you form Red Riot? How have you adapted during COVID? Cell7's experience in a recent Inspired by Iceland campaign What music projects are you working on now that we can look out for? What is your favorite Icelandic word or phrase? Red Riot's Spotify playlist Red Riot's Instagram Cell7's Spotify Playlist Cell7's Instagram Hildur's Spotify Playlist Hildur's Instagram Share This Post Share on facebook Facebook Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on twitter Twitter
  • All Things Iceland podcast

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    Behind the Icelandic Music Scene Panel Discussion

    35:35

    So many people around the world have fallen in love with Icelandic music because of the amazing artists from this tiny country in the North Atlantic ocean. Like many industries, the Icelandic music scene has had to pivot during tough times in order for artists to continue working/creating and for the industry itself to keep alive. To get a better insight into how the Icelandic music scene has adapted during this time, I hosted a panel of experts in the industry. These amazing people include María Rut Reynisdóttir is the Head of Cultural Office for the City of Reykjavik and the Project Manager for Reykjavík Music City; Sigtryggur "Siggi" Baldursson is the Managing Director for Iceland Music, whose mission is to help tell the story of Icelandic music around the world, and he was the drummer in the band "The Sugarcubes"; Will Larnach Jones is the Managing Director and Head of Bookings for Iceland Airwaves, one of Iceland's biggest music festivals. Listen to Live Icelandic Music During "Live from Reykajvík" Use my special link below to get a discounted rate of the live stream of the "Live from Reykjavík" concert happening on November 6th, 2021. This hybrid event has limited in-person seats and will be live-streamed from four iconic venues in Reykjavík. Amazing Icelandic artists like Ásgeir, Bríet, Aron Can, Daughters of Reykjavík, and more will perform. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OA7bwomj45A&list=RDCMUCacXXvaNHJQhMYU7f77OrBA&start_radio=1 Full Biographies of the Speakers on the Panel Sigtryggur Baldursson - MD of Iceland Music Siggi heads up a great time at Iceland Music, whose mission it is to help tell the story of Icelandic music around the world. Iceland Music is the music export office of Iceland. We facilitate the growth and development of the Icelandic music sector through building relationships between musicians and the various services that support their careers, such as festivals, PR and labels, and transnational promotion. Iceland Music also administers a number of export grants to Icelandic musicians which help them perform internationally. He is also a kind, warm and funny man! And in a former life he was the drummer for The Sugarcubes, who were the first Icelandic band to make big waves overseas, and as such played a huge part in the music / tourism conversation around Iceland, and with the label Bad Taste (Smekkleysa) María Rut Reynisdóttir - Head of the Culture Office in the City of Reykjavík María Rut studied Creative Project and Process Management at the KaosPilot school in Denmark and started her career in Iceland as the Executive Assistant to Magnus Scheving, creator and CEO of the LazyTown children’s TV series. María first got involved in the music industry when she joined the social music platform Gogoyoko.com back in 2008 as Head of Charity (and later COO) and took on the management of Iceland's biggest reggae band, hjálmar. She was the Program Manager of Iceland Airwaves in 2010, the Manager of the You Are In Control conference on creative industries in the digital age in 2011 and the General Manager of the Icelandic Music Awards 2012 - 2015. María has taught Project Management at the Icelandic Academy of the Arts and sat on the board of Gogoyoko.com and Music Express travel fund. María has been the manager of internationally acclaimed artist Ásgeir from the start of his career in spring 2012 as well as managing dj. flugvél og geimskip. María became the Project Manager for the Music City of Reykjavík where her responsibilities will be to ensure and support a thriving music community in the city through various activities and projects. She is now the Head of Cultural Office for the City of Reykjavik. Will Larnach -Jones, Managing Director and Head of Boookings for Iceland Airwaves Will Larnach-Jones has worked in music for 20 years – wearing many hats throughout that time – manager, publicist, agent, A&R, music programmer, marketing 'guru' and erstwhile (rubbish) DJ. Along the way,
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Icelandic Ghost Story: Halloween Special Episode

    18:49

    Icelandic ghost stories have been told over the centuries and there is one in particular that I am sharing in this episode. “Deacon of Dark River” or Djákninn á Myrká is a spooky story that involves love, Christmas and the undead. Over the last couple of years, Halloween has become more popular in Iceland, even though there is another holiday (Öskudagur), where kids dress up and sing for candy. However, that holiday happens on Ash Wednesday and not much happens during this time of the year, so it makes sense that Icelanders are gravitating towards celebrating Halloween. Random Fact of the Episode “Trolls in the Knolls: 35 Icelandic Folk & Fairy Tales ” is the book I referenced in the episode. It has some fun stories that are a mix of bizarre, fascinating and a little scary. Icelandic Phrase of the Episode Gleðilega Hrekkjavöku - Happy Halloween Subscribe to the All Things Iceland Newsletter Don't miss out on announcements of special content for those planning a trip to Iceland. Click Here Join the All Things Iceland Community on Patreon Some of you might be aware that one of my goals for the podcast is to travel around Iceland more to interview different people in each region. In July, I set up the All Things Iceland community on Patreon. It’s a membership platform that was founded in 2013. It allows for creators like me to provide exclusive content to listeners like you in exchange for a monthly subscription. Each month I am doing Ask Me Anything videos, Live Chats, and Folklore Friday each week. Sometimes I do updates about my life in Iceland. I do not share this content on any other channel. The support from my patrons on the All Things Iceland community on Patreon will help to evolve All Things Iceland. There are several membership tiers to choose from and each tier has a variety of benefits. If you would like to join the community, go to patreon.com/allthingsiceland. I look forward to having you join. Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og Gleðilega Hrekkjavöku! Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and Happy Halloween! Share this post Share on facebook Facebook Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on twitter Twitter Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Facebook Youtube
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    5 Things That Have Made Immigrant Life in Iceland Easier For Me

    21:11

    Immigrant life in Iceland has surprisingly been a smooth transition for me. I think part of that has to do with the fact that there are certain things in the country that have made living here easy. Of course it is important to mention that what I point out in this episode are based on my own experience and will vary from person to person. In this podcast episode, I go over 5 specific things that come to mind when I think about what has made immigrant life in Iceland easier as I continue to learn and adjust to the country. Taxes for Expats Thank you to Taxes for Expats for sponsoring this podcast episode. I’m incredibly grateful for this awesome tax service because they make my life a million times easier when it comes time to file in the US. Their online platform is intuitive, and you get matched up with a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) that thoroughly works on your taxes to make sure you are fully compliant regarding filing your taxes. Every year, it is a headache for me to get it done but not anymore because I know I can rely on Taxes for Expats to handle the paperwork for me. Here is the list of the 5 things that make immigrant life easier that I talk about in the episode: Getting my taxes down by Taxes for Expats - crucial for immigrant life if you want to stay compliant with the tax laws in your home countryHaving community (in-person and online)Seeing familiar products from the US in stores in IcelandEnglish is widely spoken hereBeing able to get shipments for a good price via iHerb.comI often get asked by people from around the world how they can move to Iceland. It varies for everyone, but I recommend checking out this video to get an idea of what visas are available to you and much more.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJJZdsXsFus Random Fact of the Episode One of the funny things to me is that I have totally taken on the habit of Icelanders where they bring an empty suitcase with them when they go on vacation. It is often so expensive to buy clothes and certain products here, that it can be less expensive to buy a plane ticket and bulk shop for things out of the country. Icelandic Word of the Episode Innflytjandi - immigrant Share this post Share on facebook Facebook Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on twitter Twitter Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega.Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Exclusive interview with the President of Iceland: Guðni Th. Jóhannesson

    1:27:43

    2021 has been such an interesting year for me and I was just as shocked as anyone that I was able to interview the President of Iceland, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson. I talk about how the opportunity to interview Guðni during the podcast episode because it is quite unusual. The President was very kind to answer all of my questions, including the questions that the members of the All Things Iceland Patreon submitted. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTJo-K3_PV8&t=1s Here are the questions I asked the President of Iceland during the interview: What motivated you to run for President of Iceland in 2016?  Can you explain a bit about what your duties are, and what kind of power you do have in the Icelandic government? -  What have you learned from previous Icelandic Presidents What is most challenging about being President of Iceland? How has COVID impacted your Presidency? What He likes about being President of Iceland The myths about Iceland he wants to debunk The President’s favorite history about Bessastaðir (The Icelandic President’s Residence) Has there been anything interesting and/or strange that have you experienced since leaving behind your life as an ordinary citizen and becoming the head of the Icelandic state? One of the most surprising things I read about you is you’re a very distant cousin of Barack Obama. Was it shocking to you when you found that out? Also, have you met the Obamas? What is your favorite Icelandic word or phrase? Questions From my patrons on Patreon Before assuming the office of the president you had an academic background in Icelandic history. When you leave office what do you think you will focus on studying or writing about? As an individual who has translated the works of Stephen King into Icelandic what is your favorite work by the Author? Is there any literature you would love to see translated that has not been? Join the All Things Iceland Patreon Community Some of you might be aware that one of my goals for the podcast is to travel around Iceland more to interview different people in each region. In July 2020, I set up the All Things Iceland community on Patreon. It’s a membership platform that was founded in 2013. It allows or creators like me to provide exclusive content to listeners like you in exchange for a monthly subscription. Each month I am doing Ask Me Anything videos, Live Chats, and Folklore Friday each week. Sometimes I do updates about my life in Iceland. I do not share this content on any other channel. The support from my patrons on the All Things Iceland community on Patreon will help to evolve All Things Iceland. There are several membership tiers to choose from and each tier has a variety of benefits. If you would like to join the community, go to patreon.com/allthingsiceland. I look forward to having you join. Share this post Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega. Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Discussing Iceland’s Recent National Election and Socialism with Sæþór

    2:04:22

    During this sit down with Sæþór Randalsson about the recent election in Iceland and his involvement with socialism in Iceland was quite insightful. More than a year ago, I interviewed Sæþór about his move from the United States many years ago and you check it out here. The beginning of this episode focuses on Sæþór sharing about how the Icelandic Parliament is set up. After all the ballots from the election are counted, coalitions of the parties that have seats in Parliament are formed. Well, the goal is that coalitions are formed but that can sometimes take more than one go for that to happen. After that breakdown, Sæþór talks about Socialism and why he is running for a Parliamentary position with the Socialis party. Many people who are not familiar with how Iceland is governed often assume that there is socialism is widely practised in Icelandic society instead understanding there is a mix of socialism and capitalism here. Join the All Things Iceland Community on Patreon Some of you might be aware that one of my goals for the podcast is to travel around Iceland more to interview different people in each region. In July, I set up the All Things Iceland community on Patreon. It’s a membership platform that was founded in 2013. It allows for creators like me to provide exclusive content to listeners like you in exchange for a monthly subscription. Each month I am doing Ask Me Anything videos, Live Chats, and Folklore Friday each week. Sometimes I do updates about my life in Iceland. I do not share this content on any other channel. The support from my patrons on the All Things Iceland community on Patreon will help to evolve All Things Iceland. There are several membership tiers to choose from and each tier has a variety of benefits. If you would like to join the community, go to patreon.com/allthingsiceland. I look forward to having you join. Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega. Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Is the Blue Lagoon in Iceland Worth Visiting?

    20:59

    Iceland’s Blue Lagoon was established in the 1990s, but it’s a much different experience now than its humble beginnings. Over the decades the Blue Lagoon went from being a bathing facility whose water run off from a nearby power plant soothed the skin of patients with psoriasis to being one of the most well known spas in the world. When travelers to Iceland are planning their trips, I often get asked if the Blue Lagoon is worth visiting. I totally understand that some “must see” places can be overhyped, so I dedicated this short podcast episode to giving you my opinion on if it is worth it to visit this famous spa. Different Passes for the Blue Lagoon + In-water Massage During the episode I go over the different passes available, the cost of each pass (comfort and premium) and what they include. I also include my experience with the in-water massage that is available as an add-on to any pass that you buy, if you decide to visit. I do not include an opinion about the Blue Lagoon’s Retreat Spa, a newer and much more expensive option than the other passes, because I’ve not experienced it. When I do try out the Retreat Spa, I will definitely share my thoughts in a separate episode.I think the most important things for anyone to keep in mind when making decisions about activities in Iceland are their budget and what kind of experiences they feel are worth splurging on. For many, visiting the Blue Lagoon is an essential part of experiencing Iceland and I think that is a fair view point.I hope this podcast episode has helped to give you some insight on whether the Blue Lagoon is worth it for you when you visit the country. If you have already visited this spa in Iceland, I'd love to hear what your experience was like in the comments. Subscribe the All Things Iceland Newsletter Don't miss out on announcements of special content for those planning a trip to Iceland. Click Here Random Fact of the Episode Before the most recent renovations at the Blue Lagoon, you used to be able to hand scoop your own silica masks from buckets placed in areas around the lagoon. With the new upgrades, you get your mask from an attendant, plus other available masks based on your skin's sensitivities. The nice thing about having an attendant give you the mask is that you know no one else has been putting their hands in it. Icelandic Word of the Episode Bláa lónið - Blue Lagoon Share This Post Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega.Thank you for kindly for listening and reading, and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Escaped Being a Child Bride to Thriving in Iceland – Najmo Fiyasko

    1:11:40

    Najmo Fiyasko’s story of growing up in Somalia and her escape from being a child bride there caught my attention when I saw her on the cover of a newspaper in Iceland. I was shocked to learn that she had been through so much at such a young age. I still have the newspaper that featured her because I just knew that one day I would interview her. The funny thing is that one fateful day she friended me on Facebook and we eventually started to chat. I was elated when she agreed to be interviewed because I wanted as many people as possible to hear about what she has overcome and the inspiration she is today. Here are some of the questions I asked Najmo Fiyasko during the interview: You went through so much at such a young age while living in Somalia. Can you share about what you had to endure and why you eventually fled to Iceland? What was your experience like when you arrived in Iceland?  What was it like adjusting to life here? How was it for you to learn the language? Were there any customs or foods that were strange or shocking to you? You’re doing such amazing work on your social media platforms by raising awareness about female genital mutilation, and rights for women and girls. Your content is in Somali and you have gained quite a large following. What is the reaction from Somali’s when you talk about these topics? Where to follow and support Najmo Fiyasko and her nonprofit women's media organisation Check out the Mid Show website to learn more and donate Follow on the Mid Show on Facebook  Subscribe to the the Mid Show on YouTube  Follow the Mid Show on Instagram Share this post Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Join the All Things Iceland Patreon Community Some of you might be aware that one of my goals for the podcast is to travel around Iceland more to interview different people in each region. In July, I set up the All Things Iceland community on Patreon. It’s a membership platform that was founded in 2013. It allows for creators like me to provide exclusive content to listeners like you in exchange for a monthly subscription. Each month I am doing Ask Me Anything videos, Live Chats, and Folklore Friday each week. Sometimes I do updates about my life in Iceland. I do not share this content on any other channel. The support from my patrons on the All Things Iceland community on Patreon will help to evolve All Things Iceland. There are several membership tiers to choose from and each tier has a variety of benefits. If you would like to join the community, go to patreon.com/allthingsiceland. I look forward to having you join. Let's Be Social. Here is where you can connect with me. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega. Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    5 Incredibly Fun Rainy Day Activities in Reykjavík For All Ages

    22:50

    Reykjavík and the rest of Iceland has gained a reputation for having many rainy days. While I’m an advocate for going out and dressing well no matter the weather, sometimes it is better to stay inside. Well, if you have to be indoors why not make it fun? The five interactive places I talk about in this episode are so much fun that they will make you forget all about the weather. An Experience Like No Other in Reykjavík I’m excited to have FlyOver Iceland as the sponsor of this podcast episode and video. I remember experiencing this interactive ride back when it first opened and I was blown away. As explained in the podcast episode, there are three distinct parts to the experience. First, you enter a Viking longhouse and hear an Icelandic storyteller explain about Vikings and settlers that came to the country. Next, you go into the Well of Time. In this room, an Icelandic troll uses their magical powers to show you visually and through music about the history of Iceland and its people.Last but not least, is the simulated flying experience. After strapping in, you feel like you’re flying over some of the remote parts of the country. It’s an incredible experience because there is wind, mist, and the seats are moving like we are in an airplane. Everyone I know who has been there, including my mother, has raved about it. I highly recommend this incredibly fun activity in Reykjavík. Subscribe to the All Things Iceland Newsletter Don't miss out on announcements of special content for those planning a trip to Iceland. Click Here 5 Rainy Day Activities To Do in Reykjavík FlyOver Iceland- 3 parts of the experience – Viking Longhouse, The Well of Time and the ride itselWhales of Iceland – 23 life sized and handmade replicas of whalesMaritime Museum – (Sjóminjasafnið ) -Fish and Folk, Dutch Merchant Shipwreck in the 1700s and Óðinn coastguard ship, which fought in the Cod Wars.Aurora Reykjavík – Northern Lights Center folklore about the northern lights from different cultures, how the northern lights work – the science behind them, a comfy theater where you can watch northern lights footage.Valdís Ice creamhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Vsy0xeVKgw Share This Post Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Random fact of the episode According to the website Reykjavík ClimaTemps.com, there are, On average there are 213 days per year with more than 0.1 mm (0.004 in) of rainfall (precipitation) or 17.8 days with a quantity of rain, sleet, snow etc. per month. Reykjavík ClimaTemps Word of the episode Rigning - rain Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega.Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!

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