PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

Risk Management and Funding Partnerships

0:00
1:35:29
Retroceder 15 segundos
Avanzar 15 segundos
Risk management practices are playing an increasingly important role in partner selection and engagement when NGOs receive funding from UN agencies or government donors. On June 10, ICVA and PHAP organized a webinar, as part of the Learning Series on Risk Management in Practice, where we examined the role of risk management in good funding partnerships as NGOs engage with external funders.

For funders of humanitarian programming of NGOs, risk management is playing an increasing role in both the decision to offer funding and the terms and conditions of partnership once a grant is secured. Funding from UN agencies for NGO partners now includes an assessment of risk management practices in partner selection. Most also use a risk rating system with partners to determine funding limits and levels of required oversight.

Donor governments currently have a wider range of practice, some with extensive risk management systems in place. For NGO partners, there can be major consequences if donor government funding is accepted without a proper risk assessment being carried out. Accounting and compliance requirements for NGOs can be difficult to meet without appropriate training, and there are often serious legal consequences if the terms of funding agreements are not met.

The topics that we have covered so far in the risk management series have primarily focused on internal decision making and the role of risk management. It is important to extend this thinking, however, to external funding relationships. NGOs should be confident that they are basing the decision to accept funding taking into consideration key questions such as:

- Can we meet expectations of the funder?
- What is the likelihood that we can fulfill compliance requirements?
- Which risk controls are missing, or should be strengthened, to help meet expectations and compliance requirements?

As with our other webinars in the series, we were joined by a panel of experts representing both NGO and funder perspectives, followed by a live discussion with participants.

Read more at https://phap.org/10jun2021

Otros episodios de "PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars"

  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Complaints and feedback mechanisms: Making much-needed changes

    2:03:44

    It has long been recognized that affected people must play an active role in decisions that affect their lives. Yet recent evaluations show that this is an area where the humanitarian sector is still lagging behind. There are few examples of systems that systematically capture the views and feedback from affected people, ensure they inform decision-making, and close the “feedback loop.” Many are not handling reports of sexual exploitation, abuse, and harassment appropriately, risking dangerous breaches of confidentiality. This webinar will be looking at some of the existing good practices, and at plans to scale them up and strengthen complaints and feedback mechanisms. Read more and access resources at https://phap.org/7dec2021
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Maximising the environmental sustainability of our work

    1:57:07

    Commitment 2 of the Climate and Environment Charter for Humanitarian Organizations, in line with the principle of “Do No Harm,” calls on us to “avoid, minimize and manage the damage we cause to the environment and the climate, while maintaining our ability to provide timely and principled humanitarian assistance”.More and more, organisations are looking into how to implement sound environmental policies and start systematically assessing the immediate and long-term environmental impact of our work in the humanitarian sector. This entails that we systematically evaluate, avoid and mitigate the negative environmental impacts of our programs as much as possible, and use our influence to push for more environmentally sustainable humanitarian action, notably when it comes to supply chains and logistics.This webinar will aim to share an overview and initial lessons learned on some of the following questions: - How can organisations develop and implement more environment friendly policies?- What are the challenges and opportunities to do so?- How can NGOs reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and responsibly use and help manage natural resources? What are some of the challenges in undertaking such a shift in our work? What are some of the requirements and standards being put in place by donors? What support will be available from donors?Read more about the event at https://phap.org/24nov2021
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    No te pierdas ningún episodio de PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars. Síguelo en la aplicación gratuita de GetPodcast.

    iOS buttonAndroid button
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Accountability and inclusion in the COVID-19 response: Lessons for the future

    1:58:47

    The COVID-19 response, like any other public health emergency, has required a focus on communication around associated risks and the promotion of healthy behaviors. However, in humanitarian settings, accountability and inclusion principles have been central to shaping this response. This webinar will explore lessons around Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) from the COVID-19 response and decades of practical experiences around accountability in the humanitarian sector and how they can inform future health and non-health emergencies. Read more about the event on https://phap.org/2nov2021
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Adapting to the impacts of the climate and environmental crises

    2:06:56

    We are already witnessing how climate and environmental crises disproportionately impact communities in vulnerable contexts and situations, and regardless of what we do, these impacts will not disappear overnight. Commitment #1 of the Climate and Environment Charter calls on us to “Step up our response to growing humanitarian needs and help people to adapt to impacts of the climate and environmental crises.” It focuses on how we use climate change adaptation (CCA), disaster risk reduction (DDR), and anticipatory action in our programming adapt our programs to better support and strengthen people’s resilience to current and future climate and environmental risks. Many NGOs are already working to address climate change in and alongside vulnerable communities and to help organizations live up to their commitment, there are tools and resources available to guide NGOs in their work. This webinar will aim to share lessons learned on the below questions: How can NGO programming be fit for purpose, ensure that they are designed and implemented to address current impacts and help reduce future risks? How can we scale-up climate-smart disaster risk reduction efforts and identify locally appropriate solutions to address them? What are some of the tools and resources available in terms of CCA, DDR and anticipatory action? What can we learn from local, traditional, and indigenous knowledge which can be replicated in other contexts?
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Introduction to the Climate and Environment Charter for Humanitarian Organisations

    1:00:29

    The recently launched Climate and Environment Charter for Humanitarian Organisations sends a clear signal that humanitarian organizations have a key role to play in addressing crises faced by communities due to the climate and environmental crises. We must be a part of the solution by helping people adapt to a changing climate and environment, while also increasing our own environmental sustainability. This needs to be a collective endeavor, as it is clear that no organization can tackle this alone. The Charter intends to guide humanitarian action in the face of these crises and their humanitarian consequences. Serving as the starting point for the ICVA and PHAP Learning Stream on Climate Change and Humanitarian Action, this webinar will help introduce the Charter, which will serve as an important reference point for the rest of the learning stream. The questions we will look at in this webinar include:- Why the Charter is needed now?- What the commitments imply and the resources available?- How NGOs can sign the Charter and what their signature means?- What are the next steps to support organisations in implementing the Charter and to monitor progress?Read more about the session on https://phap.org/30sep2021
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Making collective accountability to affected populations a reality

    1:47:58

    Accountability to affected populations (AAP) is an essential part of good humanitarian programming. But while some organizations may integrate it well into their own operations, people do not live in silos and their needs and priorities regularly cut across different programs and as a result, they are often faced with confusing and overlapping feedback and engagement systems. Collective approaches to AAP seek to address this by focusing on the overall humanitarian response and putting people rather than projects at the center.Building on the operational research on Communication and Community Engagement conducted by the Humanitarian Policy Group at ODI, as well as its ongoing work around inclusion, the first webinar will consider some of the lessons emerging from this research and explore how such approaches can be encouraged, particularly by leadership at country level. Read more about the event at https://phap.org/8sep2021
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Risk Management and Funding Partnerships

    1:35:29

    Risk management practices are playing an increasingly important role in partner selection and engagement when NGOs receive funding from UN agencies or government donors. On June 10, ICVA and PHAP organized a webinar, as part of the Learning Series on Risk Management in Practice, where we examined the role of risk management in good funding partnerships as NGOs engage with external funders.For funders of humanitarian programming of NGOs, risk management is playing an increasing role in both the decision to offer funding and the terms and conditions of partnership once a grant is secured. Funding from UN agencies for NGO partners now includes an assessment of risk management practices in partner selection. Most also use a risk rating system with partners to determine funding limits and levels of required oversight.Donor governments currently have a wider range of practice, some with extensive risk management systems in place. For NGO partners, there can be major consequences if donor government funding is accepted without a proper risk assessment being carried out. Accounting and compliance requirements for NGOs can be difficult to meet without appropriate training, and there are often serious legal consequences if the terms of funding agreements are not met.The topics that we have covered so far in the risk management series have primarily focused on internal decision making and the role of risk management. It is important to extend this thinking, however, to external funding relationships. NGOs should be confident that they are basing the decision to accept funding taking into consideration key questions such as:- Can we meet expectations of the funder?- What is the likelihood that we can fulfill compliance requirements?- Which risk controls are missing, or should be strengthened, to help meet expectations and compliance requirements?As with our other webinars in the series, we were joined by a panel of experts representing both NGO and funder perspectives, followed by a live discussion with participants.Read more at https://phap.org/10jun2021
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Partnerships and principles in conflict contexts: Voices from Nigeria and South Sudan

    1:40:13

    Partnerships between international organizations and local actors are key for the delivery of principled humanitarian aid. While progress has been made through the Principles of Partnership, much more is needed to implement these principles. This is particularly true for applying the humanitarian principles in conflict contexts – the delivery of principled humanitarian aid is a challenging endeavour in these settings that requires continuous attention.In the second half of 2020, two research teams engaged with more than 123 local actors operating in the humanitarian delivery space in the states of North Eastern Nigeria and South Sudan to investigate how partnerships and humanitarian principles were implemented. The research made interesting findings related to perceptions of double standards and difficulties with operationalising humanitarian and partnership principles, that the set of principles must operate in combination to secure principled humanitarian assistance in local contexts, and a lack of shared understanding between partners of what principled humanitarian action means in practice. Based on their discussions, the investigators are suggesting new and stronger models of humanitarian partnership that are more equitable, accountable to local actors and which take collective responsibility for principled delivery of humanitarian aid.On 2 June, we organized a launch event of the report based on this research. We were joined by the principal investigators from both research teams and representatives of local organizations in these two contexts, as well as experts on global policy, to discuss the results and their implications.Read more and access event resources at https://phap.org/2jun2021
  • PHAP: Learning sessions and webinars podcast

    Community-based protection, early warning, and conflict preparedness

    1:37:53

    In this webinar, the second of a two-part series exploring existing efforts to improve the safety of civilians during armed conflict, we will be discussing “secondary” prevention programs, in particular those focusing on strengthening communities in conflict-affected areas to reduce the risk of harm and mitigate the effects of armed conflict on civilian populations. We will hear from NGOs active in situations of armed conflict around the word about how they approach building capacity for prevention in communities – what the main considerations are and in which situations they are effective. We will also discuss what other organizations can learn from their approach and the implications this has for the humanitarian community as a whole.To learn more about this event, please visit https://phap.org/30mar2021 To watch the first event in the series, visit https://phap.org/23mar2021

Descubre los mejores podcast en la aplicación gratuita de GetPodcast.

Suscríbete a tus podcast favoritos, escucha episodios cuando estés sin conexión y déjate sorprender por las recomendaciones personalizadas.

iOS buttonAndroid button