PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

53: What Will the Future of Alzheimer Disease Treatment Look Like?

0:00
18:54
Spol 15 sekunder tilbage
Spol 15 sekunder frem
PSYCHPEARLS PODCAST

Alzheimer disease (AD) remains one of the most dreaded diagnoses a patient can get. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) raised hopes when it approved aducanumab, which promised to be the first disease-modifying drug for AD. But the approval immediately proved controversial. Three FDA board members resigned, the FDA then narrowed its patient label, and in mid-July, major hospitals announced that they would not administer the drug
In this edition of Psych Pearls, Helen Lavretsky, MD, MS clarifies the issues in the aducanumab debate and offers guidance for clinicians whose patients may ask about it. Going beyond pharmacology, she points out that other treatment options, including mind-body interventions and diet changes, have been shown to slow AD’s progression. 

In this conversation, Psychiatric Times and Lavretsky cover:

1.     The aducanumab controversy 2.     Advice for talking to patients and caregivers about aducanumab and other novel pharmacological options 3.     Mind-body and lifestyle interventions for AD 4.     AD prevention programs, including nutrition, exercise, and stress reduction 5.     Taking care of caregivers, including psychiatrists and other medical professionals 6.     How to prescribe joy 

Dr Lavretsky is a professor in-residence in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her work on geriatric depression and integrative mental health using mind-body interventions has received national attention, and she has won numerous grants supporting that work. A distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, she is also on the board of Psychiatric Times.

Flere episoder fra "PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times"

  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    60: How to Talk to Teenagers About Substance Use

    19:43

    Scare tactics don’t work. But scientific education might. Here are tips for talking with teenaged patients about keeping themselves and their friends safe. 
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    Gå ikke glip af nogen episoder af PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times - abonnér på podcasten med gratisapp GetPodcast.

    iOS buttonAndroid button
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    59: Blue Light Blockers: A Behavior Therapy for Mania

    18:29

    Last month we taught you how evening light can worsen mood. Today, we teach you how to fix that.
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    58: A Forensic Psychiatrist Takes the Stand

    10:14

    [Note: this is the second half of the Psych Pearls interview with James L. Knoll IV, MD. In the first half of the conversation, Knoll discussed the challenges of treating patients with traits like psychopathy or anti-social personality disorders. – Ed]  Forensic psychiatrists have emotionally taxing jobs: They spend countless hours studying acts of violence and the individuals who commit them. How could anyone endure this job for more than a few years?  James L. Knoll IV, MD, has survived decades in the field. In this edition of Psych Pearls, Knoll talks about how he maintains his mental well-being. He also reveals the childhood obsession that set him on his career path, reflects on how forensic psychiatry has changed over time, and looks forward to how it might change for the better in the future.   In this conversation, Psychiatric Times and Knoll cover: 1.     His childhood fascination with the Jonestown murder-suicide. 2.     How he got interested in forensic psychiatry.  3.     The risk of burnout in forensic psychiatry (or any other psychiatric specialty). 4.     How the arts and other creative endeavors can help psychiatrists stay mentally and physically well.  5.     The tension at the heart of the forensic psychiatrist’s identity: are they primarily treaters of mental illnesses, or expert witnesses?  6.     The new importance of social media for forensic investigations.  7.     Why it’s important not to judge patients—no matter how difficult they may be. Dr Knoll is professor of psychiatry and director of forensic psychiatry at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York, and clinical director of Central New York Psychiatric Center in Marcy, New York. He is Emeritus Editor-in-Chief of the Psychiatric Times and President-elect of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (2022-23).
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    57: Treating ‘Morally Objectionable’ Patients

    13:37

    Psychiatrists are not strangers to difficult and even potentially dangerous patients, but James L. Knoll IV, MD, has made these populations one of his specialties. With decades of experience in forensic psychiatry, Knoll takes listeners deep into the US criminal justice system, where he treats both inmates suffering from detention-related psychiatric disorders and an especially challenging group that he has dubbed morally objectionable patients.  In this conversation, Psychiatric Times and Knoll cover: 1.     What he means by the term morally objectionable patients.  2.     How prisons’ strict social hierarchies can contribute to psychiatric illnesses.  3.     The high prevalence of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in corrections—and their potential causes.  4.     The different challenges of treating patients in prisons vs jails.  5.     Why inmates with psychiatric illnesses end up in the correctional system for longer than those without psychiatric illnesses. 6.     The role of mental health courts in improving psychiatric care in the correctional system. 7.     The challenges of treating patients who are high in psychopathy or have anti-social personality disorders.   This is the first half of the Psych Pearls podcast with Dr Knoll. Stay tuned for the second half later in the week.  Dr Knoll is professor of psychiatry and director of forensic psychiatry at SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York, and clinical director of Central New York Psychiatric Center in Marcy, New York. He is Emeritus Editor-in-Chief of the Psychiatric Times and President-elect of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (2022-23).
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    56: 5 Personality Traits of Olympic Athletes

    22:57

    In this edition of PsychPearls, Hannah Simon, MD, introduces a new series on teen and tween mental health. Her first guest is Andrew Chen, MD, MS, the chief medical officer for USA Nordic, the national leadership organization for Nordic Combined and Ski Jumping in the United States. They discuss the importance of mental wellbeing for peak athletic performance, the programs available for Olympic athletes, and how health care providers can help students succeed—in everything from the big game to the big test.   In this podcast they cover: - Dr Chen’s path from medical school to the Olympic Games - Simone Biles and fighting the stigma surrounding mental illness - The mental health challenges facing school-aged children during the pandemic - The importance of diet and nutrition for athletic performance and mental wellbeing - 5 personality attributes that Olympians share (and what psychiatrists can learn from them) Dr Simon is a child and adolescent psychiatry fellow at New York-Presbyterian Hospital.  Acknowledgement: Thanks to Columbia University Department of Psychiatry for allowing us to present the Caring for Teens and Tweens podcast with experts in the field of psychiatry.
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    55: Four Myths About Lamotrigine

    17:29

    Lamotrigine was launched for bipolar disorder in 2003, but it was a quiet launch, and since then a few myths have gathered around it as if to fill that vacuum. Today, we will address 4 of them. 
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    54: Blue Light, Depression, and Bipolar Disorder

    11:08

    Blue light is getting blamed for everything from eye strain to cancer lately, but what does it do to our patients with depression and bipolar disorder. A lot, as you will see in this podcast, but it depends on what time of day it is shining.
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    53: What Will the Future of Alzheimer Disease Treatment Look Like?

    18:54

    PSYCHPEARLS PODCAST Alzheimer disease (AD) remains one of the most dreaded diagnoses a patient can get. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) raised hopes when it approved aducanumab, which promised to be the first disease-modifying drug for AD. But the approval immediately proved controversial. Three FDA board members resigned, the FDA then narrowed its patient label, and in mid-July, major hospitals announced that they would not administer the drug.  In this edition of Psych Pearls, Helen Lavretsky, MD, MS clarifies the issues in the aducanumab debate and offers guidance for clinicians whose patients may ask about it. Going beyond pharmacology, she points out that other treatment options, including mind-body interventions and diet changes, have been shown to slow AD’s progression.  In this conversation, Psychiatric Times and Lavretsky cover: 1.     The aducanumab controversy 2.     Advice for talking to patients and caregivers about aducanumab and other novel pharmacological options 3.     Mind-body and lifestyle interventions for AD 4.     AD prevention programs, including nutrition, exercise, and stress reduction 5.     Taking care of caregivers, including psychiatrists and other medical professionals 6.     How to prescribe joy  Dr Lavretsky is a professor in-residence in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her work on geriatric depression and integrative mental health using mind-body interventions has received national attention, and she has won numerous grants supporting that work. A distinguished fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, she is also on the board of Psychiatric Times.
  • PsychPearls by Psychiatric Times podcast

    52: What Makes Men’s Depression Different?

    22:57

    Jonathan E. Alpert, MD, PhD PSYCHPEARLS PODCAST June is National Men’s Health Month, a good time to consider the unique mental health needs of men. In this edition of PsychPearls, Jonathan E. Alpert, MD, PhD discusses mood disorders and the surprising symptoms that male patients may present.  In this conversation, Alpert also covers: 1. The etiology of major depressive disorder in men and women 2. Common comorbidities to depression among men 3. How to build a therapeutic alliance with men and encourage adherence 4. Effective pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions for men and women 5. Future directions for scientific research on mood disorders, including their connections to autoimmune, cardiac, and thyroid conditions.   Dr Alpert is the Dorothy and Marty Silverman Chair in in the department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, and professor of psychiatry, neuroscience, and pediatrics at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. 

Få adgang til hele det store podcastunivers med gratisappen GetPodcast.

Abonnér på dine favoritpodcasts, lyt til episoder offline, og få spændende anbefalinger.

iOS buttonAndroid button
© radio.de GmbH 2022radio.net logo