Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

#70 Bariatric Mental Health Q & A #4: Your Questions Answered

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15 Sekunden vorwärts
15 Sekunden vorwärts

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Nick asked this question in my Facebook group. What psychological tools could we use to avoid relapse into disordered eating? Stay right where you are because psychologist Dr. Connie Stapleton, who specializes in bariatric surgery, is with me today to give you answers.

Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 70. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.

Don’t forget to sign up for the weekly newsletter if you haven’t already. You’ll get a weekly tip, hear about new freebies, info on the latest podcast episode, be the first to know about product specials, sales, new course, whatever is going on. You can sign up today on my homepage.

Joining me today via Skype is Atlanta-based psychologist Dr. Connie Stapleton. If you’re a regular listener, then you’ve already heard Dr. Connie on the podcast before talking about your relationship with food or how to handle a bully. She has vast experience in the field of bariatrics and shares practical skills for improving your post op relationships with food, other people and most importantly your relationship with yourself. She teaches you better ways to deal with life’s stuff.

Dr. Connie's Website: http://www.conniestapletonphd.com

BariAftercare: The Podcast; available on phone podcast apps, Apple podcasts and most other podcatchers

Welcome back to the podcast, Dr. Connie! What are you working on in Atlanta?

You heard the question at the beginning from Nick. He wants to know what psychological tools could we use to avoid relapse into disordered eating? From many years of practice, I understand and appreciate the tight interface between my work as a dietitian and yours as a psychologist. Our work goes hand in hand. You can have a fabulous diet but emotions can derail your best efforts. Talk a little about psychology and then start with some of the top tools you use and suggest to avoid relapse into disordered eating.

Listen to the podcast for the 20 minute discussion.

If you have more questions you want Dr. Connie to answer the next time she’s here, let me know. You can messenger me thru Facebook or reply to one of my newsletters. I read every email that comes in. Take care of you. You're worth it.

Weitere Episoden von „Bariatric Surgery Success“

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    #75 Feeling Hangry? 5 Tips to Stay on Track During December

    11:09

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% Festive Holiday Meal Plan Freebie: https://bit.ly/3nsxI1K Podcast #74 on sports nutrition: https://www.breakingdownnutrition.com/blog/74-seven-bariatric-sports-nutrition-strategies-to-improve-workouts Podcast #30 on alcohol: https://www.breakingdownnutrition.com/blog/30-bariatric-surgery-and-alcohol-buzz-what-you-need-to-know The holidays are here with all their fun festivities, family and friends, and of course… food. Ok, let’s be real. There’s also a to-do list that’s way too long coupled with too little sleep, too many commitments, very little down time, food everywhere you turn and what did I leave out? It’s a recipe for feeling hangry and overwhelmed. Are you with me? Let’s kick that hangry feeling to the curb and stay on track the entire month of December. I have five tips to help you stay on track now and go into the New Year feeling strong.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 75. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.A fresh new year is just around the corner. Be sure and sign up for the Breaking Down Nutrition newsletter. It’s a quick way to find out first what’s going on in bariatric nutrition from new freebies, upcoming courses, tips, product discounts and the latest podcast episode. It’s super easy to sign up on my home page https://www.breakingdownnutrition.com   Liz asked me how to stay on track. I’m sharing from a nutrition and food viewpoint and I’ll have Dr. Connie bring tips from a mental health perspective to kick off your new year in January. So Liz, the first tip for staying on track is to stop that hangry feeling before it gets a hold of you. You know the word hangry. It means you're hungry and angry and they go together. You’re hungry and start to feel stressed, overwhelmed and angry or you’re angry and then remember you haven’t eaten all day or very little. This not-so-tasty recipe for hangry is a disaster for all of your hard work and best efforts. The key: we can’t let ourselves (and I count myself here too) get hungry, overly tired or angry.Because there’s so much to do, get your shopping done now…early this month. Make a mug of tea (decaf, if you’re feeling stressed), stay in your pj’s and shop online if the thought of fighting crowds sends you to the fridge for a snack. After the holidays, shop year round and put gifts away for those ‘need a gift at the last minute’ moments and to take the stress out of holiday shopping where you feel the need to buy everything for everyone in a couple of weeks. Maybe you cut back on gifts and do more things together making new memories. Don’t miss this one…come close and listen. What about a gift for you? You heard me. You? What brings you joy? Is it taking your dog for a long quiet walk? Watching Christmas movies cuddled under a blanket? Eating leftovers and playing games with your family or friends? Choose something just for you and plan it in your schedule right now…several times during this month. This is not selfish. It is self preservation. You are not selfish.2. To prevent that hangry takeover, plan meals and snacks ahead. What? Ahead? Yes, here’s why. If you wait until you are hangry, you aren’t going to plan anything much less eat well. You’re going to reach for whatever is in front of you or easy to obtain. Whatever will stop the hunger and stop the angry /tired /overwhelmed feelings. It’s not going to be broccoli either. The holidays don’t need to win at getting you off track. Start now. Stock up on your smart snacks. Then take a look at the week to come. How many and what type of events do you have? First, could you say ‘no’ to anything that feels like too much? If you can’t say no, how about preparing a yummy, yet healthier option to take along? Eat a snack (protein and high fiber carbs) before you go to cut down on cravings and hunger. What about meals for this coming week? Consider prepping an item or two on the weekend or one night to have during the week. Put portions in the freezer to pull out when you’re dragging. This is my go-to secret sauce that I’ve done for years and it works. My work is busy and life gets hectic and crazy. You with me? I look at our upcoming schedule every week and think about when and what meals we need so we can eat well and stay on track amidst the craziness. It’s the key to staying on track day to day, week to week, and long term.3. Eat protein first always UNLESS you’re an athlete who is working out a lot. You may need to tweak this a bit in terms of when you eat your carbs and how many grams you eat. If you missed episode 74 on sports nutrition, go back and listen. You can always find it on the website or on your favorite podcatcher. 4. Fill in with smart carbs: those non starchy veggies and fresh fruit along with a small amount of high fiber starchy carbs. Decide today that during the month, you’ll have food on hand that makes it easy to eat well. Choose items you love. What would that be? For me, it’s a good spinach salad with pistachios, avocado and kalamata olives. Make it quick to prepare so you will eat them. Eat lots of protein, then your smart carbs and drink water to stay full and stay off the sugar roller coaster.5. Treats. You thought I would forget these. Not a chance. If you deny yourself the treats you love at the holidays, what happens? You feel deprived and like you’re on a miserable diet that feels like drop the ’t’ and you’re going to die. Allow yourself to have small portions of the goodies you really want. No guilt here. Plan for them or else you will end up craving and possibly binging on way too much. Allow yourself to have it and enjoy it. No dumping syndrome allowed either. To help prevent this, eat your other food first so you feel satisfied and then have your small treat. Cuts down on dumping. Oh, let’s not forget alcohol. Remember that after surgery, alcohol will affect you very quickly and strongly and with a very small amount so be aware. Listen to episode 30 for a lot more info so you’re smart about it.The holidays are a wonderful time of year. Part of the celebration is taking care of yourself and being good to you…you’re worth it
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #74 Seven Bariatric Sports Nutrition Strategies to Improve Workouts

    15:08

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% Are you a bariatric athlete? Working out to feel good now and to keep moving forward with your fitness level? Try theses seven strategies to get the most from your workouts.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 74. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.Have you signed up for the weekly Breaking Down Nutrition newsletter? It’s a quick way to find out first what’s going on in bariatric nutrition from new freebies, upcoming courses, tips, product discounts and the latest podcast episode. It’s super easy to sign up at the bottom of my home page https://www.breakingdownnutrition.com   Let’s talk sports nutrition and specifically bariatric sports nutrition which is a very new field of research. I want you to know this up front because there aren’t a lot of sports nutrition guidelines if you’ve had bariatric surgery and are involved in sports and workout. The guidelines currently available can vary a lot between different types of workouts such as endurance/distance running for half marathons and marathons for example, as compared to weight lifting. Since dietitians often specialize in an area of nutrition just like physicians in medicine, bariatric dietitians may or may not be up-to-date on sports nutrition and dietitians who specialize in sports nutrition might not know a lot about bariatric nutrition. Bottom line: Ask your dietitian specific questions about your workouts or sports. They may need to check with their contacts and resources. Read on your own and then ask more questions, and then add in some trial and error. Each of you is different and each of your surgeries and outcomes are too. The type of surgical procedure matters in how you tweak the diet for workouts. For example, a sleeve gastrectomy tends to be easier to adapt to than a Roux-en-Y procedure because it’s less invasive which typically means a smaller incision and less tissue trauma during surgery. I’m the kind of person that wants direct, specific answers. Are you? And often, it just doesn’t work that way in medicine or nutrition. It does’t mean there aren’t strategies that work, there are for sure. But it may take you some trials and tweaking to find what works for you. So let’s look deeper into what we know now.If you exercise for less than one hour, most likely you can continue with your daily bariatric diet or you may need a few more calories. Where the calories come from, meaning which macros, depends on what your workout is like. If you’re an athlete who exercises at higher intensity for longer than one hour at time, there are several things to think about. Remember, you’re unique and special so trial and error is the answer to find what foods and fluids you tolerate the best as you work out. Let’s look at seven things to consider:Have you heard the term ‘nutrition periodization’? It means that your diet or how much you eat should match the level of your activity. In a less intense workout, typically under an hour, your body will need less total carbs and calories than if you’re training longer and at a higher intensity. Your workouts that are lower intensity and less time (again, typically under an hour) usually work well with your normal daily intake or a few more additional calories as I mentioned just a minute ago. If you workout longer (one hour or more) and at a higher intensity, you may need to eat 5-6 smaller meals or snacks rather than 3 meals. These 5-6 smaller meals include both pre and post exercise meals and snacks. The volume of your meals and snacks will depend on your surgery type and personal tolerance as well as your training demand. Keep an eye on your weight so you prevent weight regain from eating more calories than you are burning in your activity. These pre and post workout meals and snacks should include both protein and whole food carbs such as fruit, whole grains or starchy veggie just like you eat when you’re not working out. What do you eat first? Your answer has always been protein, right? But here’s a potential conflict to think about. If you’re lifting weights, that protein first concept works but what if you’re walking/running/biking/swimming instead or training for a 5K, 10K, half marathon or marathon? You may not get the carbs you need for these types of events and could bonk. What is bonk? You’ll know if it happens. It’s where you feel a sudden loss of energy and a sudden fatigue which is caused by the depletion of glycogen stores in the liver and muscles. You don’t want this to happen and it’s why circling back with your bariatric dietitian to personalize your needs with your specific types of training is so important. You’ll need more carbs and may need to eat them first so this is an important discussion to have as it goes against what you’re always told to do.Let’s call this one food for thought. Intensive exercise is probably smarter after one-two years when your caloric intake can be higher and the macros tweaked. That does’t mean you don’t exercise. Not at all. The first six months, you’re healing and you’re just trying to move around more. Then you move on to walking, swimming, etc but the intensive workouts might be better initiated one to two years after your surgical procedure. Have this discussion with your team if you want to work out harder and longer and it’s still early in your recovery.If you’re down the track and desire to increase your workout, what does a pre workout meal look like? A couple of minutes ago we just talked about the need to include both protein and whole food carbs with the amounts of each based more on the type of workouts you do. Some general examples would be:An egg with 1/2-1 slice of whole grain toastDeli meat wrapped around a low-fat cheese stick and fruitCottage cheese with fruit: berries, grapes or bananaRemember, the protein or carb amount may need to be changed based on the type of exercise you’re doing. If you’re 3-4 hours out from your workout, a meal fits in fine. As you get closer to the time you plan to workout, reduce the amount of food and if it’s only 30 minutes - 1 hours before you get started, continue to hydrate only. Since you should know your event or training days, aim to pre-hydrate a bit more and increase your fluid intake 2-4 cups in the 1-2 days before your hard training or event. Then as usual, sip on fluids all day as well as during your workout. Continue to keep food and fluids separate by 30 or more minutes unless your dietitian has told you differently depending on how far out from surgery you are now. To help you stay hydrated, you can eat foods with a higher fluid/water content such as Greek yogurt, a protein shake, even veggies and fruit which have high water contents. Use your urine color as a way to monitor your hydration. What color should it be? That’s right, pale or light yellow. When it’s darker, it’s sending you the message to consume fluids.Don’t forget about dumping syndrome. Remember that if you consume foods high in refined carbohydrates you may experience bloating, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, even low blood pressure or a change in your heart rate. Symptoms vary depending on whether you experience early or late dumping syndrome. This means that using sports drinks and gels may be a problem due to the high carbohydrate content. Remember if you exercise longer than one hour, consuming carbohydrates and electrolytes can help prevent that sudden loss of energy and fatigue. Recommendations suggest to consume somewhere in the range of 30-60 grams of carbohydrate per hour, in about 10 gram increments. But you don’t have to use sports drinks or gels. They don’t have magical powers, just convenience. Did you know you can eat a few raisins or other fruit and get your carbs and calories easily? You don’t want low blood sugar or fainting as you’re trying to get stronger thru your workouts. Also, not getting enough quality calories can show its ugly face in muscle wasting, poor performance, or trouble with recovery.Speaking of recovery, try to eat or drink your meal within 30 minutes to one hour after you’ve finished your workout. Shoot for a ratio of 2:1 carb to protein for a post-workout meal. I know…this is not the typically bariatric way which is why which carbs you choose to eat is important along with how much. Your dietitian may have a certain level/strategy for you.Be sure and take your bariatric supplements daily and let your dietitian know how much you train. Increased workouts and increased calorie burn can increase the need for some supplements such as iron for example.Sports nutrition is just as important after your surgery as it is for anyone who trains or works out. Try these strategies, discuss with your health care team. Find what works for you. Take care of yourself and be good to you…you’re worth it.
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    #73 Bariatric Nutrition Q & A #5: Your Questions Answered

    21:51

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10%Ahhh slider foods…so tasty and so easy to eat copious amounts without ever feeling full or uncomfortable.Bariatric dietitians Gayle Smith and Isabel Maples join me to talk about what slider foods are and how they can cause a weight plateau and weigh regain.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 73. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.Do you need a festive meal plan for the holidays? Check out my new freebie, a festive meal plan complete with appetizer, entree, side and dessert plus the recipes and color photos of each recipe. It’s available now to the end of December.Also, do you have a question you want Gayle, Isabel and myself to answer? You can post it anytime if you’re in the Facebook Group Bariatric Surgery Success with Dietitian Dr. Susan Mitchell.Joining me via Skype are bariatric dietitians Isabel Maples and Gayle Smith. If you’re a regular listener, you know that both Isabel and Gayle join me on these bariatric nutrition Q & A episodes to answer your questions.They both have boots on the group every day in their clinics. Isabel is a registered dietitian and bariatric coordinator with Fauquier Health in Warrenton Virginia. Gayle is the bariatric dietitian at the Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery Institute in Orlando, Florida.Bariatric Dietitian Isabel Maples, RDFauquier Health Weight Loss SurgeryEmail:  [email protected] Bariatric Dietitian Gayle Brazzi Smith:OrlandoHealth.com/Bariatrics  [email protected] Questions we discuss today:What is a slider food and why do we love them so?Why are slider foods so popular and easy to reach for?What about the stress component to slider foods?How are slider foods tied to a weight loss plateau and weight regain?How can you be slider food savvy?Remember, if you’re looking for the latest freebie, ProCare supplements, portion control dinnerware, the newsletter and other resources, just go right my resource pageTake care of yourself. You’re worth it!
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #72 Does Keto Breath Smell Like Nail Polish Remover?

    8:39

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10%You know the smell of nail polish remover? That familiar smell is very similar to keto breath. Along with that smell might come a metallic taste in your mouth. Keto breath…yes, it’s a thing. Let’s talk about what keto breath is and what you can do about it if you have it.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 72. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.In the newsletter this week is a link to my new holiday freebie, a festive meal plan complete with appetizer, entree, side and dessert plus the recipes and color photos of the recipes. It will be available now to the end of December. If you’re not receiving the weekly Breaking Down Nutrition newsletter, it’s a quick way to find out first what’s going on in bariatric nutrition from new freebies, upcoming courses, tips, product discounts and the latest podcast episode. Be sure and sign up at the bottom of my home page https://www.breakingdownnutrition.com   Have you recently had bariatric surgery and now you have a terrible metallic taste in my mouth? Does brushing your teeth help for a little while and then the bad taste returns? Does your breath smell like nail polish remover? You may have keto breath.The good news right up front is that it will go away.Here’s what you need to know now about keto breath.The most common causes of bad breath are dehydration, ketosis from rapid weight loss, dental issues, and food not emptying your pouch well. Let’s start with dehydration as it’s a big factor in bad breath. It's easy to cut back on fluids after surgery when you don’t mean to because you’re having to take smaller sips and there’s less fluid in your mouth keeping it fresh. So for many reasons, and bad breath being just one, take note of how much water and other fluids you drink each day. Just as a reminder, you’ll slowly be working your way up to 8-12 cups/day or two to almost three liters of water and other liquids. You’ll start with small sips every 15 minutes as tolerated and build from there. Did you know that dehydration is the main reason for re-hospitalization after bariatric surgery? That’s why fluids are so important to start your journey off right and keep it on the right track. Sometimes bad breath can be resolved just by making sure you drink enough.If you think there’s any chance you might have tooth decay, gum disease, or any other dental issues, visit your dentist to rule it out. These types of issues can be an underlying cause of bad breath. Try to brush and even floss after each meal or snack whether it’s liquid or solid. Even brush your tongue as bacteria and food particles can build up on the surface and cause bad breath.Now let’s get to keto breath as a cause of bad breath. What is keto breath? Basically when you reduce carbohydrates to a very low level, the lack of carbs fueling your cell metabolism [meaning there’s a lack of energy to your cells], your body will turn to stored fat as an energy source and break it down it. When your body breaks down fat for energy instead of carbs, it converts the fatty acids into chemicals called ketones. The body has numerous self-regulating processes whose goal is to maintain a balance of it’s internal environment. With the increased production of ketones, the body gets rid of the them through both your breath/respiration and urine. One type of ketone, acetone, is an ingredient in some nail polish removers, which is why your breath may smell like it. So when you hear the words, keto breath, they refer to the release of ketones, which is the breakdown of stored fat in your body when there is a lack of carbohydrate for fuel. It also can give you a metallic taste in your mouth.Keto breath can happen to anyone who loses weight, but is more noticeable after weight loss surgery because of how fast the weight comes off. How do you get rid of it? As you move along your journey and start to add more carbs back to your food intake, keto breath should go away. Speak to your bariatric dietitian about it. Sometimes adding back as few as 5 grams of carbs can make a difference. Eating foods that increase saliva production, like parsley, celery and lemon or grapefruit can help a little too with bad breath.A less common problem but one I want to mention is that bad breath after lap band or gastric sleeve surgery can be caused by food that isn’t emptying the stomach pouch as it should. The result is likely a build-up of digestive fluids such as acid in the stomach pouch. This build up can put you at an increased risk for acid reflux, which often shows up as heartburn or regurgitation. The main reasons that food becomes stuck in the pouch is eating foods that are not recommended after weight loss surgery or eating too quickly. If you’re drinking plenty of fluids every day, have good oral hygiene and slowly adding carbs as allowed to diminish keto breath and you still have bad breath issues, talk to your health care team.I hear you. Keto breath is not fun to deal with when you’re trying to make many other changes after surgery. But it will go away. Remember that it’s the very low carb diet that causes it so as you start to add even small amounts of carbs back to your diet, it should correct itself. Take care of yourself and be good to you…you’re worth it.
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #71 Will Probiotics Help You Lose Weight after Bariatric Surgery?

    11:12

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10%Related: 5 Surprising Foods that Contain Powerful PrebioticsFrom neck and face creams to waters, cold brew coffee, almond butter and supplements, probiotics are being added to everything. Plus, there are also natural probiotic food sources such as yogurt, kefir, and sourdough bread. Do these probiotics help with weight loss? Three things to know about probiotics in the episode of Bariatric Surgery Success.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 71. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.Are you receiving the weekly Breaking Down Nutrition newsletter? It’s a quick way to find out first what’s going on in bariatric nutrition from new freebies, upcoming courses, tips, product discounts and the latest podcast episode. Be sure and sign up at the bottom of my home page . It’s also an easy way to communicate with me. Just hit replay to the newsletter. I read all the emails.  Probiotics are bacteria that offer a health benefit to your body. Bacteria can be a good thing as probiotics may help prevent or treat certain illnesses. It’s no wonder probiotics are often nicknamed “the good bacteria”! Why does this matter to you? Your gastrointestinal tract or GI tract contains many species of bacteria that make up what’s known as the intestinal flora. It’s a balancing act going on in the GI tract between good and bad bacteria. Think of it this way. Medications, diseases, even some environmental issues can alter this balance. This flora can “get out of whack” when you take antibiotics or other medications, and can be effected by various illness. Diarrhea is one of the most common symptoms that reveals something abnormal is going on. This is where probiotics may be helpful. Certain probiotic strains may help digestive health, positively influence cardiovascular risk factors, reduce inflammation, support your immune system, and even help fight depression and anxiety.Probiotics are live bacteria that occur naturally in foods that you can include in your daily diet such as yogurt, kefir, kombucha, tempeh, kimchi, sauerkraut, sourdough bread, even pickles and traditional buttermilk. These different foods provide a variety of probiotic bacteria strains in modest amounts and are beneficial to the intestinal flora. Probiotics can also be purchased as supplements and when taken in larger amounts or doses are considered a therapeutic treatment more like a medication. But not all probiotics survive and thrive. What does that mean? For you to derive health benefits, these good bacteria must survive the manufacturing process and storage along with the trip through the gastrointestinal tract once you take them. Since they are live bacteria, all of these factors matter, along with prescribing the right ones for the health benefit needed.Don’t miss this. It’s the bottom line for therapeutic treatment which we’ll tie to weight loss in just a moment. When using probiotics for disease-specific prevention and treatment which means a therapeutic use, it calls for the precise probiotic species that has been shown to confer health benefits for that specific medical condition. Probiotics must be identified by the genus, species and strain. For instance, with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, the genus is Lactobacillus, the species is rhamnosus, and the strain is GG. If the treatment calls for this probiotic and another is used, the benefit is missed.Plus the supplement must provides an amount that works. An adult probiotic should be alive, typically provide at least 1 billion colony forming units daily (also called CFUs) and given in the correct dose and frequency. This is why consulting a professional is so important when it comes to using them for treatment.What about probiotics in weight loss before and after bariatric surgery? Research studies indicate that someone who is a moderate weight has different bacteria in the gastrointestinal or GI tract than someone who is overweight or obese. Also interesting is that there tends to be less diverse bacteria in someone who is obese. Less diverse GI bacteria appears to be tied to more weight gain than in folks who have more diverse GI bacteria. The issue is figuring out the methods by which probiotics affect this GI bacteria, body weight and belly fat. This is currently not well understood. Probiotics may help the battle with weight loss in several ways including the release of appetite-regulating hormones like glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) which may then help burn calories and fat. There is also the thought that probiotics increase levels of fat-regulating proteins that could lead to reduced fat storage. Obesity has also been linked to inflammation in the body. If the health of the GI track is improved with probiotics, overall inflammation may be reduced which may then help with weight loss. Several strains of probiotics in both the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium family have been shown to potentially reduce weight and belly fat with more research needed to determine use, dosage, etc. However, when participants in studies stopped taking the probiotic, they gained back all of the belly fat. So will this mean that probiotics are needed daily and ongoing? This is why we need research studies first.One important word of caution. Probiotics aren’t for everyone. For example, if your immune system is impaired due to disease or treatment such as cancer chemotherapy, taking probiotics is not a good idea and may make your situation worse. If you’re pregnant or elderly you want to talk to your health care provider before taking probiotics.Until we have more specific research on weight loss and probiotics, remember probiotics in foods such as yogurt, kefir, sourdough bread, tempeh and sauerkraut may improve your digestive health and risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, reduce inflammation, and even help fight depression and anxiety.Take care of yourself and be good to you…you’re worth it.
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #70 Bariatric Mental Health Q & A #4: Your Questions Answered

    22:12

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% Nick asked this question in my Facebook group. What psychological tools could we use to avoid relapse into disordered eating? Stay right where you are because psychologist Dr. Connie Stapleton, who specializes in bariatric surgery, is with me today to give you answers.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 70. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.Don’t forget to sign up for the weekly newsletter if you haven’t already. You’ll get a weekly tip, hear about new freebies, info on the latest podcast episode, be the first to know about product specials, sales, new course, whatever is going on. You can sign up today on my homepage.Joining me today via Skype is Atlanta-based psychologist Dr. Connie Stapleton. If you’re a regular listener, then you’ve already heard Dr. Connie on the podcast before talking about your relationship with food or how to handle a bully. She has vast experience in the field of bariatrics and shares practical skills for improving your post op relationships with food, other people and most importantly your relationship with yourself. She teaches you better ways to deal with life’s stuff.Dr. Connie's Website: http://www.conniestapletonphd.comBariAftercare: The Podcast; available on phone podcast apps, Apple podcasts and most other podcatchersWelcome back to the podcast, Dr. Connie! What are you working on in Atlanta?You heard the question at the beginning from Nick. He wants to know what psychological tools could we use to avoid relapse into disordered eating? From many years of practice, I understand and appreciate the tight interface between my work as a dietitian and yours as a psychologist. Our work goes hand in hand. You can have a fabulous diet but emotions can derail your best efforts. Talk a little about psychology and then start with some of the top tools you use and suggest to avoid relapse into disordered eating.Listen to the podcast for the 20 minute discussion.If you have more questions you want Dr. Connie to answer the next time she’s here, let me know. You can messenger me thru Facebook or reply to one of my newsletters. I read every email that comes in. Take care of you. You're worth it.
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #69 5 Surprising Benefits of Tea after Bariatric Surgery

    13:39

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10%Drink more fluids, stay hydrated. These words probably run thru your mind many times a day especially after weight loss surgery. Where does tea fit in your fluid count? Is it smart for you to drink it? You’re going to like these five benefits of tea after surgery. Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 69. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.Joining me today via Skype is Texas-based registered dietitian nutritionist Neva Cochran. Neva is a nutrition communications consultant to a variety of food, nutrition and agricultural organizations. She’s passionate about promoting fact-based food and nutrition information to help you eat beyond the headlines and enjoy a variety of nutrient-rich foods. Contact information for dietitian Neva Cochran:Twitter: https://twitter.com/NevaRDLD Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nevardld/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NevaRDLD/YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/nhcrdWelcome Neva. Listen as Neva talks about the many benefits of tea.She addresses how tea counts in your daily fluid intake, caffeine amounts in tea versus coffee, tea and depression, tea and diabetes/blood glucose and if tea dehydrates you.
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #68 5 Surprising Foods That Contain Powerful Prebiotics

    8:42

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% When I say the word probiotics, what’s the first food that comes to your mind? Yogurt maybe? But what about the word prebiotics? How are they different from probiotics? After all, they’re spelled almost the same. Stick around and let’s talk about five surprising foods that contain powerful prebiotics and the benefits to your body.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 68. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.I want to give a shout out to Ann who posted in the FB group: "I love having this facebook group and the podcast for support." Hey Ann, thanks for taking time to tell me. My go is for the Facebook group and podcast to work together so you listen to new information and have a place to talk about it. So glad you’ve joined in.Remember, if you want to join us in the facebook group, please do. You can find answers and support day-to-day or just vent if you need to. On facebook, search groups for bariatric surgery success with dietitian dr susan mitchell and ask to join. The link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/bariatricsurgerysuccesswithdrsusanmitchellBack to probiotics and prebiotics. You hear these words commonly tossed about in the supplement and food world but what do they mean anyway? Probiotics are bacteria that offer a health benefit to the body. This is a case where the word ‘bacteria’ is a good thing as probiotics may help prevent or treat certain illnesses. Its no wonder probiotics are often nicknamed “the good bacteria”. In your body, it’s a balancing act between good and bad bacteria. Think of it this way. Medications, diseases, even some environmental issues can alter this balance which is where probiotics may be helpful. Probiotics are live bacteria that occur naturally in foods such as yogurt, sauerkraut, sourdough bread, and other fermented foods.But what about prebiotics? Prebiotics are a type of fiber. Think of them as fiber that acts kind of like fertilizer for the good bacteria in your body. Probiotic bacteria feed on prebiotics. Prebiotics may also support your immune system, increase how much calcium your body absorbs, reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome or IBS and decrease your cholesterol level. Plus, you can’t forget the one thing that TV ads have been heavily promoting which ishelp with the ‘go’ or a way to help prevent constipation.Prebiotics or prebiotic fiber is found naturally in quite a few foods which may surprise you. We’ll talk about these in just a minute. They’re also added to food products like cereals, breakfast bars, and breads in a form called inulin that you’ll likely see on the ingredient list. You can also find prebiotic fiber such as inulin in pill or powdered supplements. Sometimes, prebiotics are combined with probiotics to create what I call a tag-team approach or symbiotic relationship. Remember, prebiotic fibers help enhance the work of probiotic bacteria.You might have heard that prebiotic fiber can cause gas and bloating. It can. This can happen from prebiotic food sources and especially prebiotic supplements if you take a large dose. Typically a large prebiotic supplement dose is about 15 grams but a much lesser amount could cause issues if you’ve been dealing with any gas and bloating following surgery. It’s a good time to run this by your bariatric dietitian or health care provider before you add any prebiotics in supplement form. If you ever take a prebiotic supplement it’s better to start with a small dose of 2-5 grams and assess your tolerance before adding more. Because prebiotics are classified as fiber, they count toward the daily fiber recommendations of 25-30 grams. Here’s the nice surprise I mentioned. You’ve probably been consuming prebiotic fiber every day and didn’t know it. I love this about eating real food. Prebiotic fiber occurs naturally in many foods that you probably eat now if you’re six months to a year down the track from surgery. These 5 food sources may surprise you: apples, bananas, onions, garlic, and asparagus. You probably never associated them with prebiotics. Remember we said that the prebiotic fiber in these foods acts kind of like fertilizer for the good bacteria or probiotics in the digestive tract. So every time you add onions or garlic to a dish, you’re adding a source of prebiotics. Asparagus is a low carb vegetable that also brings prebiotics to the table. Apples and bananas, so common right, but oh so good for you. The good news about eating these whole food sources like onions, garlic, asparagus, bananas and apples for the prebiotic fiber is that these foods also contain beneficial vitamins and minerals. It’s a win-win all the way around. And typically less of a bloating and gas issue too…can’t forget that, right? The next time you slice an apple, think of all the healthy goodness it’s bringing to your body.Other foods that contain prebiotic fiber include artichokes, barley, berries, flaxseed, leeks, legumes, and oats. These will be beneficial to your body as well as you add back foods into your daily diet. Take care of yourself and be good to you…you’re worth it.
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #67 Bariatric Nutrition Q & A #4: Your Questions Answered

    23:33

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% I bet you’ve wondered this too. Olga posted, "Would you please make an episode on how to deal with the common cold after gastric bypass? What cold medications are allowed, what to avoid? Is it ok to get Theraflu?"Bariatric dietitians Gayle Smith and Isabel Maples join me to answer your questions.Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 67. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.Before I jump in with Isabel and Gayle, don’t forget, if you’re looking for the latest freebie, ProCare supplements, portion control dinnerware, the newsletter and other resources, just go right my resource page: Also, do you have a question you want us to answer? You can post it anytime if you’re in the Facebook Group, Bariatric Surgery Success with Dietitian Dr. Susan Mitchell. Or go right to my website and there’s a contact us link at the top of the home page. You can also hit reply to the weekly newsletter if you receive it. If not, why not? You can sign up for it on the home page of the website too.This week joining me via Skype are bariatric dietitians Isabel Maples and Gayle Smith. If you’re a regular listener, you know that both Isabel and Gayle join me on these bariatric nutrition Q & A episodes to answer your questions.They both have boots on the group every day in their clinics. Isabel is a registered dietitian and bariatric coordinator with Fauquier Health in Warrenton Virginia. Gayle is the bariatric dietitian at the Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery Institute in Orlando, Florida. Isabel’s and Gayle’s contact information: Bariatric Dietitian Isabel Maples, MEd, RDFauquier Health Weight Loss [email protected] Bariatric Dietitian Gayle Brazzi Smith, MS, RDN, CSOWM, LDNOrlandoHealth.com/Bariatrics  [email protected]
  • Bariatric Surgery Success podcast

    #66 Experiencing Brain Fog after Bariatric Surgery?

    11:01

    Procarenow.com for free samples. Use Code: Susan10 to save 10% Has someone told you to take vitamin B-12 for brain fog after bariatric surgery? B-12 helps to keep your brain healthy and even helps to prevent Alzheimer’s disease as you age.  Hi, I’m registered dietitian nutritionist Dr. Susan Mitchell. You’re listening to the Bariatric Surgery Success podcast episode number 66. Most of my career I’ve worked in some type of media, particularly radio where I did morning drive nutrition spots for over 18 years. That’s what lead me to start podcasting and ultimately to you. I created Bariatric Surgery Success to provide you with life-changing information based on science along with simple strategies and tools to help you be successful in your transformation and your entire journey. So happy you’ve connected with me. You’re in the right place and I’m glad you’re listening.I want to give a shout out to Brittany who posted in the FB group: I love your podcasts! Brittany I love you right back for taking time to say so and share with the group. If you want to join us in the facebook group, please do. It’s an active group where you can find answers and support day-to-day or just vent if you need to. There’s a lot to deal with after surgery, right? On facebook, search groups for bariatric surgery success with dietitian dr susan mitchell and ask to join. Click for the direct link.Has someone told you to take vitamin B-12 for brain fog after bariatric surgery? First let’s take a broad look at the brain, then vitamin B-12 and it’s tie to your brain and finally bring it home to bariatric surgery. Your brain has a lot of demands. It needs both calories and nutrients or vitamins and minerals. Don’t miss this fact. The brain uses 20% of your calories. Did you have any idea it was that high? B-vitamins, folate, zinc and other vitamins and minerals all join in to keep the brain healthy. A deficiency of these can cause depression type symptoms, poor memory, problems with attention, learning, fatigue, mood and appetite or what just feels like brain fog or brain impairment. This is one of the big reasons that follow up lab work after your surgery is so very important. If you listen to some of my other podcasts, you know I talk about many vitamins and minerals working together as a team. B-vitamins, folate, zinc and other vitamins and minerals such as thiamin all work like an effective basketball team in your brain. Deficiencies in these or even too few carbs can all cause brain fog but today the focus is on your brain and B-12 also known as cobalamin.A B-12 deficiency after weight loss surgery is very common but did you know that B-12 deficiency increases with age too? This happens for a couple of reasons. Often as you get older, you tend to eat less, which decreases the amount of B12 in your diet. Also up to 1/3 of people who are 50+ don’t absorb B-12 from their food because they don’t produce enough stomach acid. This is the same thing happening after bariatric surgery but for a different reason. You have surgical changes which affect absorption. Less B12 is released in the stomach as much of the stomach is bypassed or removed. Add age to the picture and a low vitamin B-12 blood level is tied to what feels like brain fog or brain impairment and could also be tied to dementia including Alzheimer’s disease. Maybe you’ve heard the word homocysteine. A high homocysteine level is not something you want. It’s an amino acid in the blood and elevated levels have been linked to dementia, heart disease, stroke. The good news is that homocysteine can be lowered with the B vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid which seem to slow down the loss of brainpower.Let’s review the science in today’s Science 101 on Vitamin B-12 specific to bariatric surgery. The absorption of B-12 can be affected due to changes in acid production and reduced availability of what’s called the intrinsic factor. This intrinsic factor helps the B-12 to be absorbed and used by the body. When it’s not there or insufficient, B-12 doesn’t get absorbed and used as it should. You could experience brain fog symptoms and feel like your coordination is off plus numbness and tingling of your arms, legs. This is a prime reason why routine screenings are so important and typically done every six months or so. These screenings help your health care provider pick up on a possible deficiency hopefully before it becomes a problem. Two other tips to keep in mind. First, are you taking proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) like Prilosec, Nexium or Prevacid? These meds reduce stomach acid and stomach acid is necessary to absorb B-12. Even meds such as Zantac or Pepcid can increase the risk for B-12 deficiency. Number two. Alcohol. It inhibits the absorption of B vitamins such as B12 and thiamine. Even without alcohol, you may already be struggling to get enough of these vitamins due to surgery so be aware. Go back and listen to podcast #30 on Bariatric Surgery and Alcohol Buzz for more in depth info. As a reminder. Do you recall what foods contain B12?B12 is found in protein foods like meat, eggs, cheese, fish, chicken, milk, and fortified breakfast cereals meaning it was added to the cereal. You want these in your diet but the amount needed is higher than typically what food can provide. How much vitamin B-12 do you need after surgery? The dose is 250-500 micrograms (ug) a day with most suggestions in the 350-500 microgram range daily or 1000 mcg every other day. The dose depends on your surgery, your lab results and the route of administration meaning under the tongue, injection, etc. Sometimes an intramuscular injection of B12 or a nasal spray will be ordered by health care team. You can take B12 at any time or with any other supplements. It’s likely that your multi will have enough B-12 in it so check the label before you buy additional. Be sure and discuss your lab screenings with your health care team before you decide to take any extra.PS Check out the Supplement Facts on a number of products to see what you like best. As I’ve shared before I’m a fan of and partner with ProCare Health.

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