Science for Policy podcast

Adriana Bankston on career moves from science to policy

0:00
39:19
15 Sekunden vorwärts
15 Sekunden vorwärts

Some scientists get involved with policy without giving up their day jobs. Others take their scientific training and move wholesale into the world of policy, taking up roles as advisors, analysts, knowledge brokers or advocates on specific issues.

In the first in a two-part series focusing on students and early-career researchers, Dr Adriana Bankston of the University of California shares her tips and experiences on leaving academia behind and joining the fast-paced world of policy.

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