Farmerama podcast

63: Indian farmers’ protests, the Forever Flock and Biopriming

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30:09
15 Sekunden vorwärts
15 Sekunden vorwärts
63: Indian farmers’ protests, the Forever Flock and Biopriming by Farmerama

Weitere Episoden von „Farmerama“

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    69: COP 26: Glasgow growing, participatory action research and migrant worker solidarity

    41:51

    This month, we’re heading to Glasgow to bring you three stories from the fringes of the COP26 conference. We’ll hear from Tenement Veg about the challenges of growing food in Scotland’s largest city. We’ll highlight Nourish Scotland’s involvement at the conference, and speak to Warami Jackson and Marlon Opigo, two participants in Feedback’s “participatory action research”- an innovative and inclusive project researching young people’s experience of the food system. We’ll visit the Landworkers’ Alliance’s agroecology hub, and speak to the LWA’s Catherine McAndrew about the urgent call for solidarity with migrant workers. This episode of Farmerama was produced by Katie Revell, Olivia Oldham and Abby Rose. We’re very grateful to those of you that support us and allow us to bring you these stories every month. Even the smallest contribution makes a big difference to us. If you’d like to become a supporter, visit patreon.com/Farmerama Links: ‘Young Seeds for your Thoughts: Towards a Just Food System’. www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNkYxX90O7Y
  • Farmerama podcast

    68: Commoners in Cumbria and collective landscape restoration in Spain

    34:11

    This month we speak to Cumbrian sheep farmer and celebrated author James Rebanks about the collective discovery of aligned interests of farmers as they are regenerating their landscapes together. And Abby has visited, Erica ten Broeke, Landscape Manager at Commonland, a Dutch NGO that bring a holistic approach to landscape restoration as initiator, catalyst and enabler of large-scale, long-term restoration initiatives.  This episode of Farmerama was made by Jo Barratt, Abby Rose and Olivia Oldham. A big thanks to the rest of the Farmerama team Katie Revell, Fran Bailey, Annie Landless, Eliza Jenkins and Dora Taylor. Our theme music is by Owen Barratt. We’re very grateful to those of you that support us and allow us to bring you these stories every month. Even the smallest contribution makes a big difference to us. If you'd like to become a supporter, visit patreon.com/Farmerama Links: James Reanks @herdyshepherd1 La Junquera lajunquera.com/ Common Land https://www.commonland.com/
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    67: Fibre farming, Ugandan permaculture and rain-fed regeneration in Spain

    35:22

    This month we begin with a story from Rosie Bristow, MSc student of Fashion and Textile Management based at Phantassie Organic Farm in Scotland. We learn from Rosie about a farm to fashion project she’s pioneering as part of her studies, to prototype a UK textile economy in collaboration with George Young at Fobbing Farm in Essex. Next, we head to Uganda, where we hear from Noah Ssempijja of YICE (Youth Initiative for Community Empowerment), a social enterprise focused on providing smallholder farmers access to regenerative farming technique. Finally, we hear from Alfonso Chico Gusman and Yanniek Schoonhoven of La Junquera, who are experimenting with rain-fed regenerative techniques on their mixed farm in the arid mountains of southern Spain. La Junquera’s influence extends beyond the farm, with training initiatives such as the Regenerative Academy which offers education to the wider community as well as research collaborations with different universities bringing research to the farm. We will be hearing more from La Junquera over the next few months, as they are a great example of the power of collective action to build on the regenerative movement! This episode of Farmerama was made by Jo Barratt, Abby Rose and Olivia Oldham. A big thanks to the rest of the Farmerama team Katie Revell, Fran Bailey, Annie Landless, Eliza Jenkins and Dora Taylor. Our theme music is by Owen Barratt. We’re very grateful to those of you that support us and allow us to bring you these stories every month. Even the smallest contribution makes a big difference to us. If you'd like to become a supporter, visit patreon.com/Farmerama Links: Rosie Bristow @straw_into_gold YICE Uganda https://twitter.com/YICEUganda La Junquera https://lajunquera.com/ Regeneration Academy https://www.regeneration-academy.org/
  • Farmerama podcast

    Landed part 4: Places of possibilities

    48:25

    So if, as it turns out, the family farm is a colonial concept, what are the alternatives? And if we’re to address the tangled mess of challenges we’re faced with – the climate emergency, biodiversity loss, farmer burnout, food inequality and the need for reparations – then perhaps we need to be thinking not at the scale of the individual farm, but of the entire landscape. In this final episode, Col explores the patchwork of pre- and post-colonial land relations that already exist across Scotland. He learns more about the tried and tested model of crofting that still exists in parts of the Highlands, as well as Scotland’s community right-to-buy legislation, and asks whether, together, these could be part of a broader strategy to rethink land ownership and tenure, and even our relationship to land more broadly. In the end, Col concludes that it’s not the case that the family farm is no longer relevant – it’s just that on its own, it’s not enough to deal with what the future has in store. Instead, the family farm must come to understand itself as part of a much broader landscape – one made up of a kaleidoscope of different understandings of, and approaches to, what it means to be Landed. Landed is produced by Col Gordon and Katie Revell, with Executive Producer Abby Rose. Our Project Manager is Olivia Oldham. Huge thanks to Josina Calliste for her guidance and input and to Sarah Nicholas for all her help and support. Thanks also to Jo Barratt. The music for Landed is by Dagger Gordon and Col Gordon. This episode featured Marian Bruce, Helen O’Keefe, Patrick Krause, Calum MacLeod, Adam Calo, Will Frazer and Emma Whitham. Funding for the project was provided by the funding platform Necessity. Farmerama is committed to keeping all our episodes free, and to paying our team a living wage. To do so, we rely on support from you, our community of listeners. If you’d like to help us make more podcasts, you can become a Patron at patreon.com/farmerama.
  • Farmerama podcast

    Landed part 3: Colonial connections

    52:30

    In Part 2, farmer’s son Col Gordon explored the ways in which the colonisation of Highland Scotland destroyed a rich pre-colonial culture and relationship to the land. But in Part 3, he learns that the story of Scotland as the victim of colonial practices is just one part of a much bigger narrative. The Highlands is one of the least racially diverse parts of the UK, and it would be easy to think of the area as far removed from the UK’s grim colonial history – a place where racial justice and reparations have no direct relevance. But, as Col discovers, this would be far from the truth. Col traces the connections – some indirect, others very concrete – between the rural landscape he grew up in and global patterns of displacement, exploitation and enslavement. To dig deeper, he speaks with Josina Calliste, co-founder of Land in Our Names (LION) – a Black-led, grassroots collective committed to reparations in Britain by connecting land and climate justice with racial justice – and explores what it means to be a person of colour in rural Scotland today. Landed is produced by Col Gordon and Katie Revell, with Executive Producer Abby Rose. Our Project Manager is Olivia Oldham. Huge thanks to Josina Calliste for her guidance and input and to Sarah Nicholas for all her help and support. Thanks also to Jo Barratt. The music for Landed is by Dagger Gordon and me, Col Gordon. This episode featured David Alston, Josina Calliste, Iain MacKinnon, Srik Narayanan and Philomena de Lima Funding for the project was provided by the funding platform Necessity. Farmerama is committed to keeping all our episodes free, and to paying our team a living wage. To do so, we rely on support from you, our community of listeners. If you’d like to help us make more podcasts, you can become a Patron at patreon.com/farmerama
  • Farmerama podcast

    Landed part 2: Re-storying the landscape

    47:41

    Over the last 250 years, Gaelic culture in the Highlands of Scotland has experienced what academic Iain MacKinnon refers to as “cultural devastation”. For farmer’s son, Col Gordon, the forced displacement of people during the Highland Clearances, and the dismantling of Gaelic language and traditions, are best understood through the lens of colonisation. Now, only small pockets of Gaelic culture remain, detached from the conditions and ways of life that they evolved in. In this episode, Col learns about the pre-colonial attitudes of the Gaels towards the land, investigating the question of what came before the family farm. What he finds is a system based on community and collective work, with a yearly migration to the hillside “shieling” to graze the cattle and rejuvenate the spirit. Above all, what he finds is a fundamentally different way of relating to the land – an understanding that people belong to the land, not the other way around. Could a revival of these “indigenous” practices, and these relationships to the land, provide a route forward? And, if so, how might we “re-indigenise” in an open and inclusive way? Landed is produced by Col Gordon and Katie Revell, with Executive Producer Abby Rose. Our Project Manager is Olivia Oldham. Huge thanks to Josina Calliste for her guidance and input and to Sarah Nicholas for all her help and support. Thanks also to Jo Barratt. The music for Landed is by Dagger Gordon and Col Gordon.
  • Farmerama podcast

    Landed part 1: The family farm

    30:54

    “What if we’ve been getting this wrong?” Col Gordon is a farmer’s son from the Scottish Highlands. After a decade away, he’s finally returned to the place that he loves: his family farm. Now, he’s eager to start realising his vision for an agroecological future: a future in which rural areas are alive with culture, many more people work on the land, farms operate in sympathy with nature, and nutritious food is available to everyone in society. But now that he’s back, Col’s starting to wonder whether this vision can be achieved within the existing family farm model. Increasingly, it seems the odds are stacked against farms like his. Many are struggling to survive, let alone to employ people and deliver good food affordably to local communities. As older farmers retire without succession plans, and their land is amalgamated into large industrial operations, the future of the small family farm looks pretty bleak. As he wrangles with all of this, Col stumbles across something that throws his vision – and his very understanding of farming – into doubt. What does it mean to say that “The family farm is a colonial concept”? And might this jarring idea be the key to understanding the problem – as well as its potential solutions? Landed is produced by Col Gordon and Katie Revell, with Executive Producer Abby Rose. Our Project Manager is Olivia Oldham. Huge thanks to Josina Calliste for her guidance and input and to Sarah Nicholas for all her help and support. Thanks also to Jo Barratt. The music for Landed is by Dagger Gordon and me, Col Gordon.
  • Farmerama podcast

    66: Ecosystem agriculture, the probiotic turn and regenerative flower growing

    33:13

    This month we are introduced to the importance of ecosystem architecture by a forest ecologist and winegrower. We hear from two researchers investigating a shift in how we understand our relationship with the natural world - from one where humans are in control, to one where we work with other life-forms and biological processes to build human and ecosystem health. And we finish hearing one grower’s experience of implementing regenerative techniques on her flower farm.
  • Farmerama podcast

    65: Community farm investment, Naked Oat Mylk and Palestinian fair trade

    35:55

    This month we start with a fond farewell to internationally renowned water specialist Professor Tony Allen, most noted for his pioneering work on the concept of virtual water. We’ll hear a conversation with him from 2017 about the OurField Project. We then hear from the Kindling Trust. They work on a range of projects that model a fairer, more responsible, ecologically restorative food system, and are opening up an opportunity to invest in their new farming endeavours in Manchester. Next, farmer John Turner introduces us to a new vision of dairy farming- a vegetarian dairy farm producing cow’s milk alongside innovative naked oat mylk. Tiger and Float are making this oat mylk, using the naked oats that John is growing. Finally we meet Mohammed Ruzzi, a fair trade farmer in Palestine, who talks to us about the role of regenerative farming and the Zaytoun cooperative in supporting a better life for Palestinian farmers.
  • Farmerama podcast

    64: Dung beetles, herbal medicine, hydrology and soil carbon

    33:40

    This month, we learn from an entomologist in Wiltshire about the importance of dung beetles in our farming systems. We hear how a medical herbalist in London is bringing people together to care for and heal each other and a soil microbiologist shares how restoring hydrological cycles is vital in mitigating the climate crisis and how the soil carbon sponge is core to that.

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