Ancient Greece: Myth, Art, War podcast

Aristophanes’ Lysistrata

0:00
47:35
15 Sekunden vorwärts
15 Sekunden vorwärts

Staged not long after the disastrous defeat of the Athenians at Syracuse during the Peloponnesian War, the seriousness of Aristophanes’ Lysistrata would not have been lost on its audience, despite it being a comedy laden with sexual humour. In this lecture Dr Heather Sebo looks at the very real messages about the futility of war, the parlous state of Athens and the position of women in Athenian society in Aristophanes’ comedy of a sex strike orchestrated by women to bring their men to their knees…

Copyright 2013 Gillian Shepherd / La Trobe University, all rights reserved. Contact for permissions.

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    Aristophanes’ Lysistrata (handout)

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