Truce - History of the Christian Church podcast

Suffrage and Prohibition

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The 1800s were a drunken mess. The median adult in the US drank 1.7 bottles of 80 proof alcohol each week. Each week! The 1800s were also a time when women didn't have many rights: they couldn't vote, were expected to stay home, and were somewhat invisible in the public sphere. Until they'd had enough. Thanks to the efforts of organizations like the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, women fought for their rights. On this episode of the Truce Podcast, we begin our series on this historic battle. Guests: Jenna DeWitt @Jenna_DeWitt Jim Vorel from Paste Magazine @JimVorel Claire White from the Mob Museum in Las Vegas @TheMobMuseum Sarah Ward from the Woman's Christian Temperance Union https://www.wctu.org/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

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    Christmas and the Sermon on the Mount

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  • Truce - History of the Christian Church podcast

    Suffrage and Prohibition

    26:49

    The 1800s were a drunken mess. The median adult in the US drank 1.7 bottles of 80 proof alcohol each week. Each week! The 1800s were also a time when women didn't have many rights: they couldn't vote, were expected to stay home, and were somewhat invisible in the public sphere. Until they'd had enough. Thanks to the efforts of organizations like the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, women fought for their rights. On this episode of the Truce Podcast, we begin our series on this historic battle. Guests: Jenna DeWitt @Jenna_DeWitt Jim Vorel from Paste Magazine @JimVorel Claire White from the Mob Museum in Las Vegas @TheMobMuseum Sarah Ward from the Woman's Christian Temperance Union https://www.wctu.org/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
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