The Contrarian Investor Podcast podcast

The 'New Normal' of Blue-Collar Labor Shortages, With Gad Levanon, The Conference Board

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This episode brought to you by the Connecticut Economic Literacy Initiative. The get this podcast without ads or announcements, and a week before regular subscribers, sign up for the premium service through our Substack or Supercast.

Gad Levanon, head of Labor Market Institute at The Conference Board, joins the podcast to discuss his views of employment trends.

Levanon's analysis differs from the consensus view of labor markets. In his view, unusual demographic and educational trends are causing a 'new normal' of shortages among blue-collar workers. These jobs can be expected to see fast wage growth, bringing a host of restraints on the next stage of economic expansion.

Content Highlights:

(Spotify users can link directly to the start of the segment in question by clicking on the timestamp below)

  • The 'new normal' of labor shortages (3:35);

  • The economic impact of rising wages for blue-collar workers: corporate profits and higher consumer prices (7:29);

  • Automation has the potential to help the trend somewhat, but there are reasons to be skeptical (10:37);

  • How close is the U.S. to reaching full employment? (14:29);

  • What all of this says for the next stage of the economic cycle (16:57);

  • Background on the guest (20:22);

  • The 'work-from-home' trend and how that is impacting things (22:47);

  • Other trends in employment and labor markets (27:27);
  • The guest's primary concerns about the economy and society at present (31:22).
Background on the Guest:

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