Question of the Week, from the Naked Scientists podcast

How long before the food I eat becomes 'me'?

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Listener Martin wanted to know: "How long does it take the food I eat to become part of me?" Eva Higginbotham set off to find out the answer... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

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