Oh! What a lovely podcast podcast

18 - Sounds of War

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What songs were popular during the First World War?   This month friend of the podcast Dr Emma Hanna (Kent) returns to talk to us about popular music during the war. Along the way we discuss who decided what music was suitable for the troops, the rock and roll lifestyle of men in the Royal Flying Corp, and which versions of Mademoiselle from Armentières are suitable to play to your children.   References: Emma Hanna, Sounds of War, Music in the British Armed Forces during the Great War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021)

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    20 - Short Stories

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    How do you convert the First World War into a short story?   This month we're joined by Dr Ann-Marie Einhaus (Northumbria) to explore short fiction published during and after the First World War. Along the way we discuss what makes a short story, the varying themes that appeared over time, and how too many sandwiches may be a sign of a German spy.   References: The Penguin Book of First World War Stories, ed. by Barbara Korte and Ann-Marie Einhaus (Penguin Classics, 2007).   The Prisoner's Defence and Other First World War Stories, ed. by Ann-Marie Einhaus (British Library, 2017).
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    19 - Franz Ferdinand

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    How should we remember the man whose assassination sparked the July Crisis?   This month we are joined by Dr Sam Foster (UEA) to examine the life, death, and representation of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Along the way we discuss the complicated relationships of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, Franz Ferdinand's interactions with the contemporary press, and how everything eventually leads back to railways.   Bibliography Mentioned in the episode: Christopher Clark, The SleepwalkersRobert Gerwart & Erez Manela, Empires at War 1911-1923 [On Franz Ferdinand + Austria-Hungary]  Richard Ned Lebow, Archdukle Franz Ferdidnand Lives!: A World Without World War I (2014) Mark Cornwall, The Undermining of Austria-Hungary: The Battle for Hearts and Minds (2000) Mark Cornwall (ed), The Last Years Of Austria-Hungary: A Multi-National Experiment in Early Twentieth-Century Europe (2005 edition) Mark Cornwall (ed), Sarajevo 1914: Sparking the First World World (2020) Samuel R. Williamson, Austria-Hungary and the Origins of the First World War (1991) Stefan Zweig & Anthea Bell (trans.), The World of Yesterday (2013 paperback edition) [More for context on why Austria-Hungary gained the sort of image that it did, especially after 1945] Adam Kozuchowski, The Afterlife of Austria-Hungary, The: The Image of the Habsburg Monarchy in Interwar Europe (2013) Hannes Leidinger (ed), Habsburg's Last War: The Filmic Memory (1918 to the Present) (2018) Peter M.Judson, The Habsburg Empire: A New History (2018) Steve Beller, The Habsburg Monarchy, 1815–1918 (2018) Markian Prokopovych, Carl Bethke & Tamara Scheer (eds), Language Diversity in the Late Habsburg Empire (2019) [On the war's origins and perceptions of Austria-Hungary and wider 'the wider East'...] James Lyon, Serbia and the Balkan Front 1914: The Outbreak of the Great War (2015) Troy R.E. Paddock, Contesting the Origins of the First World War: An Historiographical Argument (2020) Leon Trotsky, 1912-1913: The War Correspondence of Leon Trotsky (2005 edition) Igor Despot, The Balkan Wars in the Eyes of the Warring Parties: Perceptions and Interpretations (2012) Dominik Geppert, William Mulligan, et al (eds), The Wars before the Great War: Conflict and International Politics before the Outbreak of the First World War (2015) James Pettifer &Tom Buchanan (eds), War in the Balkans: Conflict and Diplomacy Before World War I (2015) Andrea Orzoff, Battle for the Castle: The Myth of Czechoslovakia in Europe, 1914-1948 (2009) John Paul Newman, Yugoslavia in the Shadow of War: Veterans and the Limits of State Building (2015) Hugh Seton-Watson & Christopher Seton-Watson, The Making of a New Europe: R.W. Seton-Watson and the Last Years of Austria-Hungary (1981) Robert Evans, Dušan Kováč, Edita Ivaničková, Great Britain and Central Europe, 1867-1914 (2002) Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius, The German Myth of the East: 1800 to the Present (2010) Maria Todorova, Imagining the Balkans (1997) Vensa Goldsworthy, Inventing Ruritania: The Imperialism of the Imagination (1998) Eugene Michail, The British and the Balkans: Forming Images of Foreign Lands, 1900-1950 (2011) Diana Mishkova, Beyond Balkanism: The Scholarly Politics of Region Making (2018) Nicholas Daly, Ruritania: A Cultural History from the Prisoner of Zenda to The Princess Diaries (2020) André Maurois Fattypuffs and Thinifers (1930).
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    18 - Sounds of War

    58:58

    What songs were popular during the First World War?   This month friend of the podcast Dr Emma Hanna (Kent) returns to talk to us about popular music during the war. Along the way we discuss who decided what music was suitable for the troops, the rock and roll lifestyle of men in the Royal Flying Corp, and which versions of Mademoiselle from Armentières are suitable to play to your children.   References: Emma Hanna, Sounds of War, Music in the British Armed Forces during the Great War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021)
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    17 - Theatre and the First World War

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    How does the First World War appear on the stage?   This month Angus, Chris and Jessica speak to the theatre historian Helen Brooks about her work on the Great War Theatre project. Along the way, we discuss the importance of sex to the rules of censorship, consider the role of theatre in bridging the past and the present and find out which play threatens to give Chris nightmares.   References: Greatwartheatre.org.uk Helen Brooks, "Remembering the War on the British Stage: From Resistance to Reconstruction", in Revival After the Great War: Rebuild, Remember, Repair, Reform (Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2020) 165-178 Helen Brooks, "‘Are there any more recruits?’ - British theatre and the recruitment drive, 1914–1915," First World War Studies 10, no 2-3 (2020): 207-224 Gott Straf England Dorothy Mullard, In the Hands of the Hun In Time of War The Era The Stage Bruce Bairnsfather and Arthur Elliot, A Better 'Ole (1917) R.C. Sherriff, Journey's End (1928) Star Wars  Grand Guignol A Gas Attack J.M. Barrie Arthur Wing Pinero The Battle of the Somme (1916) Oh! What a Lovely War (1963) Nick Whitby, To the Green Fields Beyond (2000) Nick Stafford, War Horse (2007) Michael Morpurgo, War Horse (1982) The Greatest Showman (2017) Michael Morpurgo, Private Peaceful (2003)
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    16 - 37 Days

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    How do you turn the diplomatic exchanges before the outbreak of the First World War into a TV drama? This month Angus, Jessica, and Chris discuss the 2014 BBC series 37 Days. Along the way they explore the role of France in the war's outbreak, how similar the cast appeared to historical figures, a random Star Wars connection, and whether Guy Ritchie should tackle the topic next. References37 Days (1914)Christopher Clark The Sleep Walkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 (Penguin, 2013) Mark Hayhurst The battle of '37 days' (openDemocracy, 2014)David Elstein The BBC’s Great War (openDemocracy, 2014)Fritz Fischer Germany’s Aims in the First World War (WW Norton & Company, 1967)James Joll, The Origins of the First World War (1970)The Pursuit of Love (BBC1 2021)William Le Queux, The Invasion of 1910 (1906) John Buchan, The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915) Parade's End (BBC2 2012)
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    15 - Computer Games

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    How do you turn the First World War into a computer game?   In this episode Chris and Angus talk to Yoan Fanise the developer behind such First World War computer games as Valiant Hearts: The Great War and 11-11: Memories Retold. Along the way we discuss making the audience cry, different national interpretations and memories of the conflict, and whether it's become easier to sell a First World War computer game.   References   Games   11-11: Memories Retold (DigixArt: 2018)   Battlefield 1 (EA Dice: 2016)   Valiant Hearts: The Great War (Ubisoft: 2014)    Verdun 1914-1918 (M2H & Blackmill Games: 2013)   Documentaries   Apocalypse: World War 1 (Francetv 2: 2014)   Additional Reading It’s Hard to Play in the Trenches: World War I,Collective Memory and Videogames – Adam Chapman Great War Games: Notes on Collective Memory, theAdynaton, and Posthumanism - Iro Filippaki Pixel Lions – the image of the soldier in First World War computer games - Chris Kempshall War collaborators: documentary and historical sources inFirst World War computer games- Chris Kempshall   Race, Battlefield 1 and the White Mythic Space of theFirst World War - Stefan Aguirre Quiroga Liminality and the Smearing of War and Play inBattlefield 1 - Debra Ramsay  
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    13 - Popular Films First World War Films

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    What themes unite better-known films about the First World War?   In this episode, Jessica, Chris and Angus look at some of the better-known films about the war, covering a fifty-year period from All Quiet on the Western Front(1930) to Gallipoli (1981). Along the way, we discuss body horror, Kirk Douglas's jaw line, European unity and whether the British have a particular penchant for cross-dressing. References: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) La Grande Illusion (The Grand Illusion) (1937) Paths of Glory (1957) Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) Gallipoli (1981) Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) The Hayes Code Battle of the Somme (1916) The Great War (1964): 'Making of' documentary Casablanca (1942) Jason Crouthamel, An Intimate History of the Front: Masculinity, Sexuality and German Soldiers in the First World War (2014) Emma Hanna, Sounds of War: Music and the British Armed Forces During the Great War (2020) 'Sapper', Sergeant Michael Cassidy, RE (1916) 'Allo, 'Allo (1982-1989) Lawrence of Arabia (1962) King and Country (1964) The Long, Long Trail (1961) Joan Littlewood, Theatre Workshop, Stratford Deborah Thom, Nice Girls and Rude Girls: Women Workers in World War I (1998) Sister Kate Luard, Diary of a Nursing Sister on the Western Front (1915) Carloyn Holbrook, Anzac: The Unauthorised Biography (2014) Charles Bean, The Anzac Book (1916) Tron (1982) Mad Max (1979) Full Metal Jacket (1987) 1917 (2019)
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    12 - Obscure First World War Films

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    What makes a First World War film ‘obscure’? This month Chris, Angus and Jessica discuss some lesser-known films set during the First World War.  Along the way, we consider national stereotypes, the dangers of a Dawn Patrol drinking game, the brilliance of Basil Rathbone, the role of the individual in wartime and the greatest honour a French officer can bestow on a British serviceman. References: The Big Parade (1925) A Better ‘Ole  (1926) Wings (1927) Dawn Patrol (1938) The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) Le Roi de Coeur (King of Hearts) (1966) In Which We Serve (1942) Casablanca (1942) ‘Goodbyeee’ – Blackadder Goes Forth (1989) Evelyn Waugh, Scoop (1938) Bruce Bairnsfather Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) Soviet Soldiers Dancing (Twitter: @communistbops) R.C. Sherriff, Journey’s End (1928) Rosa Maria Bracco, Merchants of Hope: British Middlebrow Writers and the First World War (Berg, 1993) The Right Stuff (1993) Charles M. Schultz, Peanuts The Battle of Somme (1916) William Shakespeare, Two Noble Kinsmen Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Knight’s Tale’, The Canterbury Tales Pearl Harbour (2001) Saving Private Ryan (1998) Downton Abbey (2010-2015) Ilana Bet-El, Conscripts: Forgotten Men of the First World War (The History Press, 1999) Stephen Badsey, ‘Battle of the Somme: British War Propaganda’, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television , Volume 2, Number 2, 1984. La Grande Illusion (1937) The Prisoner (1967) Twitter: @OWALPodcast

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