Nature Podcast podcast

Researcher careers under the microscope: salary satisfaction and COVID impacts

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The Nature salary and satisfaction survey reveals researchers' outlook, and NASA’s test of planetary defences.


In this episode:

00:45 Salary and satisfaction survey

Like all aspects of life, scientific careers have been impacted by the pandemic. To get an insight into how researchers are feeling, Nature has conducted a salary and satisfaction survey. We hear from some of the respondents.


Careers Feature: Stagnating salaries present hurdles to career satisfaction


09:07 Research Highlights

The physics of a finger snap, and the surprisingly strong silk of jumping spiders.


Research Highlight: It’s a snap: the friction-based physics behind a common gesture

Research Highlight: High-speed spinning yields some of the toughest spider silk ever found


11:23 Briefing Chat

We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the plans to smash a spacecraft into an asteroid, and how baby formula is changing to better resemble breast milk.


Nature News: NASA spacecraft will slam into asteroid in first planetary-defence test

Chemistry World: The science of breast milk and baby formula


Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.




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