Babbage from The Economist podcast

Babbage: Omicron and on

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Countries are scrambling to stop the Omicron variant of the coronavirus. We search for scientific clues to understand how it will shape the pandemic. Professor Sharon Peacock, one of the world’s top variant hunters, predicts Omicron will be more transmissible than previous strains. And, will Omicron supplant the Delta variant globally? Correspondent Hal Hodson looks to immunology for answers.


Alok Jha hosts, with The Economist’s health policy editor, Natasha Loder and deputy editor, Edward Carr.


We would love to hear from you—please take a moment to complete our listener survey at economist.com/babbagesurvey.


To keep up-to-date with our coverage of the Omicron variant, go to economist.com/omicron.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.




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