Americana Podcast podcast

Kam Franklin (The Suffers) | The Renaissance Woman in Her Element

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It’s happened to all of us. we’re chatting with another person, getting to know each other and then the question “What kind of music do you like” comes up.. At which point many of us are better off reading a thesaurus outloud trying to describe it as we do our best impression of that scene in High Fidelity where Dick is describing the enigmatic Mardie de Salle to Rob “She's kind of Sheryl Crow-ish crossed with a post-Partridge Family pre-L.A. Law Susan Dey kind of thing”... As a non-artist it’s one thing, but applying that pressure to musician’s to describe their work. It's a lot to ask. 

but that’s our job here at Americana Podcast and this episode’s guest more than rose to the challenge.

Kam Franklin, is a Houston native and frontwoman for the 7 piece band known as The Suffers. Forming in 2011, the suffers sport an impressive ensemble that lovingly refers to their work as gulf coast soul. a term that actually perfectly describes the sound which can be found within their two-record discography. The Suffers create an expansive, lush air with their music. an array of colorful horn pieces, worldly drum rhythms and Kam’s knockout voice. and talking with kam about her work is enlightening. She is unafraid to describe the root of her abilities, her all-inclusive influences, and most importantly- the pursuit of trying to improve at any given opportunity. 

So join us today as our host Robert Earl Keen discusses with Kam Franklin the importance of education, band communication and the music we have to look forward to from Kam as well as The Suffers.

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    It’s happened to all of us. we’re chatting with another person, getting to know each other and then the question “What kind of music do you like” comes up.. At which point many of us are better off reading a thesaurus outloud trying to describe it as we do our best impression of that scene in High Fidelity where Dick is describing the enigmatic Mardie de Salle to Rob “She's kind of Sheryl Crow-ish crossed with a post-Partridge Family pre-L.A. Law Susan Dey kind of thing”... As a non-artist it’s one thing, but applying that pressure to musician’s to describe their work. It's a lot to ask. but that’s our job here at Americana Podcast and this episode’s guest more than rose to the challenge.Kam Franklin, is a Houston native and frontwoman for the 7 piece band known as The Suffers. Forming in 2011, the suffers sport an impressive ensemble that lovingly refers to their work as gulf coast soul. a term that actually perfectly describes the sound which can be found within their two-record discography. The Suffers create an expansive, lush air with their music. an array of colorful horn pieces, worldly drum rhythms and Kam’s knockout voice. and talking with kam about her work is enlightening. She is unafraid to describe the root of her abilities, her all-inclusive influences, and most importantly- the pursuit of trying to improve at any given opportunity. So join us today as our host Robert Earl Keen discusses with Kam Franklin the importance of education, band communication and the music we have to look forward to from Kam as well as The Suffers.
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