Weekly Space Hangout podcast

Weekly Space Hanbout: October 20, 2021 - Volcanism on Venus and Ice on Mars with PSI’s Megan Russell

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This week we are very pleased to welcome Megan Russell from the Planetary Science Institute to the WSH.

Since starting at the Planetary Science Institute in March, Megan has gone from exploring volcanism on Venus to assisting in the search for ice on Mars. She is currently a Science Team Member and on the operations team for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Shallow Radar (SHARAD) experiment, and a System Analyst with the Colorado Shallow Radar Processing System (CO-SHARPS) team. Megan is also working on a Mars Subsurface Water Ice Mapping project.

After completing her BSc in Space Science at York University, Megan moved to Vancouver to work at PhotoSat, an Earth remote sensing company, as a Project Manager/Satellite and GIS Data Consultant. She then completed her MSc in Geophysics/Planetary Science at UBC with Dr. Catherine L. Johnson and worked as a teaching assistant and research associate in the department.

Megan's past research experience has involved delving into the world of volcanism on the planet Venus via geophysical investigations. She used observations collected from orbit during the Magellan mission (1990-1994) to help determine characteristics about the surface and subsurface, and tie this into the planet's evolution. To accomplish this, she used radar surface images, radar altimetry and high-resolution elevation maps created from stereo radar photos.

You can learn more about Megan and her research by visiting her PSI website: https://www.psi.edu/about/staffpage/mrussell.

****************************************
The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help:

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    Weekly Space Hangout - 12-JAN-2022: Dr. Scott Bellamy, Mission Manager for NASA’s DART Mission and Europa Clipper

    56:52

    This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Scott Bellamy to the WSH. Scott is the Mission Manager for NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission which successfully launched in the early morning hours from Vandenberg atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on November 24, 2021. Scott Bellamy is one of the Mission Managers in the Planetary Missions Program Office (PMPO) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, AL. Presently, Scott is responsible for day-to-day oversight of the Europa Clipper flagship mission, as well as the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission. DART's mission is to conduct a real-life experiment in changing an asteroid’s orbit through kinetic impact. In late September 2022, DART will intercept the moonlet (i.e., Dimorphos,) of the asteroid Didymos — a binary system — and slow Dimorphos’ orbit by up to 10 minutes. DART is the first-ever mission of this type and is sponsored by NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office. Europa Clipper, on the other hand, will launch in October 2024 to perform a detailed exploration of Jupiter’s ocean-world moon, Europa. This mission will provide priceless information on the thickness and composition of the ice shell to possibly enable a future mission to land a probe on Europa and search for microbial life. Prior to these missions, Scott was simultaneously the Mission Manager for another project that we at CosmoQuest hold near-and-dear to our hearts, the Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission to obtain and return the first-ever United States asteroid sample; the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster–Commercial (NEXT-C) project providing DART’s primary propulsion; and the Near Earth Object Surveyor (NEO Surveyor) mission to provide the capability for detecting low-observable asteroids. Scott originally came to Marshall Space Flight Ccenter as the Air Force Liaison Office in 2008 and afterwards retired with over 25 years of service. He then served in several roles, including being a member of the very small team that shaped what later became the Space Launch System (SLS), before joining the Planetary Missions Program Office in 2013. **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: December 5, 2022 — Astronaut Nicole Stott, Author of Back to Earth: What Life In Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet — And Our Mission To Protect It

    51:10

    To ring in 2022 on Weekly Space Hangout we are pleased and excited to welcome Nicole Stott to the show. Nicole is an astronaut, aquanaut, artist, mom, and now author of her first book Back to Earth: What Life In Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet – And Our Mission To Protect It. She creatively combines the awe and wonder of her spaceflight experience with her artwork to inspire everyone’s appreciation of our role as crewmates here on Spaceship Earth. Nicole is a veteran NASA Astronaut with two spaceflights and 104 days living and working in space as a crewmember on both the International Space Station and the Space Shuttle. Personal highlights of her time in space were performing a spacewalk (10th woman to do so), flying the robotic arm to capture the first HTV, working with her international crew in support of the multi-disciplinary science onboard the orbiting laboratory, painting a watercolor (now on display at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum), and of course the life-changing view of our home planet out the window. Nicole is also a NASA Aquanaut. In preparation for spaceflight, she was a crewmember on an 18-day saturation dive mission at the Aquarius undersea laboratory. Nicole believes that the international model of peaceful and successful cooperation we have experienced in the extreme environments of space and sea holds the key to the same kind of peaceful and successful cooperation for all of humanity here on Earth. On her post-NASA mission, she is a co-founder of the Space for Art Foundation (https://www.spaceforartfoundation.org/) — uniting a planetary community of children through the awe and wonder of space exploration and the healing power of art. You can read Nicole's full NASA biography here: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/stott-np.pdf To learn more about Nicole, be sure to visit her websites http://www.nicolestott.com and https://www.spaceforartfoundation.org/, and be sure to follow her on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/astro_nicole/) and on Twitter (https://twitter.com/spaceforartfoun). **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: December 29, 2021 — Do Black Holes Grow as the Universe Expands? Dr. Kevin Croker Explains Cosmological Coupling

    55:39

    This week marks the final episode of 2021, and we are excited to welcome Dr. Kevin Croker from University of Hawai’i at Mānoa! Kevin led a team that compared data from simulated black hole mergers with that from gravitational waves detected by the LIGO–Virgo collaboration. This comparison led to a surprising conclusion: ignoring the expansion of the universe may be limiting the scientific understanding of black-hole physics. The team hypothesizes that that as the universe expands outward following the Big Bang, all objects with mass grow as well - and Black Holes are no exception. This new process has been dubbed "Cosmological Coupling." Kevin Croker is an affiliate graduate faculty at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. His research interest is Einstein's theory of gravitation and General Relativity (GR). He is currently exploring the observational consequences of cosmological energy shifts within relativistic compact objects (e.g. stellar collapse remnants such as GEODEs and neutron stars). His thesis work focused on cosmological applications of GR, in particular, the Dark Energy problem, and his past work has focused on the use of numerical simulations to compare and constrain proposed extensions of GR through existing astrophysical data. He firmly believes that observation is paramount. You can read about Kevin's research in articles at PhysicsWorld: https://physicsworld.com/a/cosmological-coupling-is-making-black-holes-bigger-study-suggests/ and LiveScience: https://www.livescience.com/black-holes-expanding-with-universe The research is also described in The Astrophysical Journal Letters: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ac2fad You can learn more about Kevin and his research on his website: https://www.phys.hawaii.edu/~kcroker/ **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: 22-DEC-2021 - Cleaning Up Earth's Space Debris with Dr. Jake Abbott

    58:18

    This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Jake Abbott, director of the Telerobotics Laboratory at the University of Utah to the WSH. The proliferation of Space Debris has become an increasingly alarming reality. In fact, as recently as December 3, 2021, "The International Space Station (ISS) had to swerve away from a fragment of a U.S. launch vehicle" (source: https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/science/international-space-station-swerves-dodge-space-junk-2021-12-03/). In a paper published in November 2021 in the science journal Nature , Jake and his research team have proposed a new method of dealing with the debris: using a series of spinning magnets to move these objects. You can read more about their proposed solution here https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/waste-of-space/. Jake Abbott is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah, and he is the director of the Telerobotics Laboratory. He joined the University of Utah in 2008. Before coming to Utah, he spent three years in Switzerland as a postdoctoral researcher working with Brad Nelson at the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zurich. Dr. Abbott received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in 2005 working with Allison Okamura, his M.S. from the University of Utah in 2001, and his B.S. from Utah State University in 1999, all in Mechanical Engineering. Jake Abbott's research has been funded by the NSF (including the CAREER Award), the NIH, NASA, the Air Force, and industry. He and his co-authors have won a number of Best Paper and Best Poster Awards at international conferences. He is currently an Associate Editor for the International Journal of Robotics Research, and was previously an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Robotics. In Jake's spare time, he's a movie buff, a foodie, and an all-around supporter of the arts and the community in Salt Lake City. Jake's wife is a flamenco dancer and instructor in Salt Lake City, and he plays guitar and sings as part of her group. You can learn more about Jake and his research by visiting https://www.telerobotics.utah.edu/index.php/People/JakeAbbott and https://www.mech.utah.edu/directory/faculty/jake-abbott/. **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: 15-DEC-2021 - Dr. Paul Halpern Discusses His New Book "Flashes of Creation"

    56:46

    This week we welcome Dr. Paul Halpern, professor of physics at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. His new book, "Flashes of Creation: George Gamow, Fred Hoyle, and the Great Big Bang Debate," brings to life one of the greatest clashes of ideas in the history of science. Dr. Paul Halpern is a professor of physics at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and the author of seventeen popular science books, including The Quantum Labyrinth, Einstein’s Dice and Schrodinger’s Cat, and Synchronicity. He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He lives near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Be sure to follow Paul on Twitter (https://twitter.com/phalpern) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/DrPaulHalpern/). And don't forget to get your own copy of Flashes of Creation from your favorite book retailer! **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: 08-DEC-2021 - Why Are There So. Many. Rocks on Bennu? w/ Dr. Saverio Cambioni

    59:36

    This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Saverio Cambioni to the Weekly Space Hangout. In October 2020, OSIRIS-REx successfully collected (and stowed) a sample from the asteroid Bennu in a Touch-And-Go (TAG) maneuver that could not have been attempted — much less completed — without the assistance of the CosmoQuest community who participated in the Bennu Mappers project. Bennu Mappers launched on May 22, 2019, and ended a mere 92 days later on August 21. During this time, 3640 community members examined 4509 images which had been collected by ORSIRIS_REx during its 2 years of orbiting Bennu. They were tasked with identifying and marking rocks that exceeded a minimum size. Each image was marked by 15 people which amounts to over 14 Million total marks! This data was then forwarded to the OSIRIS-REx team and used to identify safe candidate landing sites, including Nightingale Crater where the sample was collected. Needless to say, by the end of marking images, the weary cry of virtually everyone involved was "{EXPLETIVE} Bennu!" followed immediately by "SO. MANY. ROCKS!" In a paper titled "Fine-Regolith Production on Asteroids Controlled by Rock Porosity" [https://rdcu.be/cy1TH] which was published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature on October 6, 2021, Saverio and his co-authors may have solved the mystery as to why there are SO. MANY. BOULDERS on Bennu by using machine learning and temperature data. Dr. Saverio Cambioni earned his PhD in the Planetary Sciences at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory of the University of Arizona, with a thesis on the application of Machine Learning to Planetary Sciences. He also holds a BSc and MSc in Aerospace and Space Engineering from Sapienza, University of Rome. Saverio is currently the Crosby​ Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on the formation and evolution of asteroids and terrestrial planets. You can learn more about Saverio and his research by visiting his website: https://sites.google.com/view/saveriocambioni/about-me Be sure to also follow him on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AstroSave1) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/saverio.cambioni) **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/pVGXJDUKud ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: December 1, 2021 — An Outsider's Guide to the Future of Physics with Dr. Stephon Alexander

    52:40

    This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Stephon Alexander to the WSH to chat about his new book, Fear of a Black Universe: An Outsider’s Guide to the Future of Physics, which was published on August 31. What lurks beyond the black hole singularity in our galaxy? How did cosmic structure emerge from a chaotic and featureless early universe? Is there a hidden link between the emergence of life and the laws of physics? These questions and other major problems of theoretical physics seem beyond the reach of human knowledge. But cosmologist Stephon Alexander is not so sure. Is the science really too hard, or could it be that a lack of demographic and intellectual diversity—a literal and figurative fear of the unknown—is holding science back? As Alexander explains, greatness in physics requires transgression and a willingness to reject conventional expectations. For many years, there’s been a consensus that theoretical physics has failed to break new ground in the way that led to the quantum and relativity revolutions early in the last century. Some think it’s because physics has become too difficult, but Alexander argues that the real problem is that most scientists avoid delving into uncharted or forbidden territories out of the fear—often justified—of facing reputational and professional penalties. Furthermore, he explains that the physics community is woefully homogenous, and has a poor track record of welcoming people from diverse backgrounds into the field. Stephon Alexander is a professor of cosmology at Brown University, an established jazz musician and an immigrant from Trinidad who grew up in the Bronx. He is the 2020 president of the National Society of Black Physicists and leads Brown University's Presidential Scholars program, which boosts underrepresented students. In addition to his academic achievements, he was the scientific consultant to Ava DuVernay for the feature film A Wrinkle in Time. His work has been featured by The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, WIRED, and many other outlets. He has been a guest on Nova, the “Brian Lehrer Show”, and Neil deGrasse Tyson's “StarTalk,” among much else. You can learn more about Stephon by visiting his website https://stephonalexander.com/ and following him on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/drstephon.alexander/), Twitter (https://twitter.com/stephstem), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/stephonjazz/), and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgesReiNx9TH7rQIVhTt5aw). **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/pVGXJDUKud ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: November 24, 2021 — The Night Sky with Astrophotographer Ian Lauer

    53:05

    This week we are thrilled to be joined by astrophotographer Ian Lauer. Ian is an astronomer and astrophotographer with a passion for public speaking and sharing the wonders of the night sky with the public. He has worked with telescope manufacturers and retailers around the world to building telescope systems for private and professional observatories, astrophotographers, government projects and educational institutions. Ian has a knack for making people laugh and he incorporates this skill into transforming what can often be dry and dull science topics into fun and exciting concepts. Whether he’s speaking in front of thousands of people or one-on-one, Ian's passion and energy always shines through regardless of the delivery medium, be it podcasts, stage talks, or TV shows. In addition to astronomy, Ian's other passions include backpacking, camping, and particularly metal music. According to Ian: "I've spent decades attending live metal music events, always in search of up and coming musical artists. I have and will continue to support and promote artists from the metal scene, both big and small. The joy of discovery knows no boundaries, and music is no exception." You can learn more about Ian and how to register for his astrophotography workshops by visiting his website: https://ianlauerastro.com/ Be sure to follow Ian on Twitter (https://twitter.com/ianlauerastro), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/ianlauerastro/), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/ianlauerastro/), and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKmp0RwvfcTm4ohmqNviIkA). **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/pVGXJDUKud ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: November 17, 2021 — Merger-Triggered Core-Collapse Supernovae w/Dillon Dong, CalTech

    53:00

    This week we are excited to welcome CalTech graduate student Dillon Dong to the WSH. Dillon was the lead investigator in a study that determined that a bright radio flare discovered in data collected by the Very Large Array (VLA) Sky Survey in 2017 was the result of a black hole or neutron star crashing into its companion star in a never-before-seen process. You can learn more about this study and its surprising results here: https://www.caltech.edu/about/news/a-black-hole-triggers-a-premature-supernova Dillon Dong is a final year graduate student working on finding and characterizing astronomical sources that appear and disappear on human timescales. For his Ph.D thesis, he cataloged 1.5 million radio sources in the largest high-resolution radio sky survey to date: the Very Large Array Sky Survey. By looking for sources that were not detected (but should have been) in historical observations, he discovered >1000 sources that have newly appeared in the radio sky. One of these sources was a never-before-seen type of supernova, caused by the merger of a black hole or neutron star with its massive star companion. This explosion was published in the journal Science, and received press coverage in 40+ countries. You can learn more about Dillon and his research on his website: https://dillon-z-dong.github.io/ **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.
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    Weekly Space Hangout: November 10, 2021 — Studying Stellar Nurseries and Nebulae Using 3D Printed Models with Dr. John Forbes

    1:01:20

    This week we are excited to welcome Dr. John Forbes to the Weekly Space Hangout. John is a theoretical and computational astrophysicist at the Flatiron Institute, a division of the Simons Foundation, in New York City. He studies how galaxies and stars form using supercomputer simulations, statistical modeling, and machine learning. John recently collaborated with Dr. Nia Imara from UC Santa Cruz and James Weaver from Harvard to develop a series of nine models that incorporate the three forces that govern how stellar nurseries are formed: turbulence, gravity, and magnetic fields. Using these models, they have 3D printed colorized nebulae "marbles" that visually represent the filaments and other material found in star forming regions. John earned his undergraduate degree at Caltech, a PhD at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and did a fellowship at Harvard before joining the Flatiron Institute. He is a huge fan of science fiction & board games. His favorite science fiction books include The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu, and Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson. His current favorite game is Alchemists, though for scientists some of the game mechanics (like losing a point of reputation for having too few theories published at a conference) might hit a bit close to home. On a more serious note, John cares a lot about social justice in & out of astronomy. You can read more about the 3D printed nebulae here: https://www.universetoday.com/152509/astronomers-create-3d-printed-nebulae/ You can learn more about John and his research by visiting his website at www.johncforbes.com And don't forget to follow him on Twitter where his handle is @redshiftless. **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.

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