Coda Change podcast

Impella and modern mechanical support

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From CodaZero Live, Steve Morgan talks to us about temporary mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock.

Steve gives an example of a patient with refractory cardiogenic shock, who hasn’t responded to pharmacological support. So, how do we go about choosing between temporary circulatory support options?

First, Steve acknowledges that critical care echocardiography is central.

Additionally, he discusses the use of pulmonary artery catheters. 

Finally, Steve hopes that future Randomised Control Trials might contribute to a better evidence base to guide the use of these supports in specific patients.

Finally, for more, head to our podcast page #CodaPodcast 

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