Word of the Day podcast

Shirty

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Shirty is an adjective that means irritable or ill-tempered.

Our word of the day came from the word shirt although it’s not clear exactly how. But we do know it came to become slang in the 19th century.

Alice could be a bit shirty at times, but I don’t blame her. Having to deal with those guys in packaging would make anybody irritable.

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