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Compendium

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Compendium is a noun that refers to a concise collection of information.

The Latin prefix C-O-M means ‘together,’ while pendere (PEN dare ay) is Latin for ‘weight.’ Compendium entered the English language around the late 16th century to refer to ‘what is weighed together.’ The word later came to refer to a collection of information about a particular subject.

I found a compendium on UFOs that was very helpful for my research. Having all that UFO information at my fingertips made me close to an expert on the topic.

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