Why Mums Don't Jump podcast

Gynae Girl: 'Pelvic health starts from day one'

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If I gave you a diagram of the female pelvic anatomy, would you know where to find a labia, clitoris or urethra? Don’t feel bad if the answer is no. I mean, it’s just not something we were really ever taught. But maybe we should have been?

In this episode, Helen catches up with the pelvic physio Tiffany Sequeira (@gynaegirl) who's on a mission to educate! Sex, fannies, willies, wee and lots, lots more... is how she describes what she does. 

‘I went to all girls school until I was 18. I could do algebra. I could name all the parts of a plant. I could name all this random stuff but I could not name you the anatomy of the vulva, the vagina. I could not label 5 things on a female pelvic anatomy. And I think, gosh, there is something that we’re really doing wrong here’


Helen and Tiffany discuss a pelvic floor curriculum, how pelvic health could be more inclusive, the pitfalls of talking sex on social...and how to move beyond euphemisms.

Tiffany Sequiera is @gynaegirl on Instagram
Ellie Jack Illustrations is @elliejackillustrations on Instagram and the graphics mentioned in this episode can be found here.

You can find Helen @whymumsdontjump on Instagram and Twitter or at www.whymumsdontjump.com

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