The Insurance Broker Podcast podcast

067: Smart Communications – The future of top-class customer engagement with James Brown

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Are you seeking to streamline the claim-making process, but unsure where to start? Are you struggling to keep up with your competitors, and looking to boost efficiency? Are you concerned by the emergence of instant gratification in business interactions, and determined not to be left in the dust?

In this episode, we’re very pleased to be speaking with James Brown, CEO of Smart Communications. In conversation with Boston Tullis’ Sarah Myerscough, he explains the profound importance of great customer experience in order to accelerate your provision of insurance solutions, and to boost client retention. He suggests that while his company offers bespoke, software-based solutions, face-to-face communications will never cease to fuel high-quality customer experiences, and by providing a combination of both, businesses can stay ahead of the market.

 

Quote of the Episode

‘You should never ask the question of somebody that you should already know the answer to.’

James Brown argues that, when it comes to customer solutions, if a computer can do something you’re unable to, you should let it. The software offered by his business, Smart Communications, will locate all the necessary, publicly available data about a client to initiate the claims making process, and any remaining data will be inputted by the customer themselves. Consequently, the customer journey is simplified from the very start, which is essential for business growth and client retention. James suggests that any potential for customer frustration should be nipped in the bud, as ‘the vast majority of consumers out there have changed provider as a result of bad customer experience’.

Key Takeaways

In 2021, customers do not want to endure painstakingly slow and repetitious phone conversations with rudimentary robot data-collectors in order to make a claim. If a competitor is offering face-to-face consultations, or a wider range of digital solutions, customers will naturally switch to their cover.

To prevent this, you should aim to optimise the available channels at your disposal, to guarantee that the most efficient and effective process is taking place during each stage of the customer journey. James clarifies that while a digital interface is often very important and useful, there are certain points in the customer journey that require a human-to-human interaction. Take care to ensure that when integrating digitised processes, either for data collection, customer feedback, and so on, they are employed at points during the customer journey when it is most fastidious to do so.

Efficiency is key. We have all become highly accustomed to the Amazon experience, particularly throughout the COVID period. Our demands can be fulfilled with just the click of a button, and soon, James anticipates, this mentality will be transferred to various other businesses and industries. As Sarah suggests, we will soon want all our business procedures to be ‘frictionless, on my terms, on my time scale, and yesterday, please’.

In the years to come, Artificial Intelligence will undoubtedly transform business efficiency and remove the human element from various procedures. However, the primary shift that James anticipates across various industries is towards great customer engagement via a wide range of communication means.

 

Best Moments/Key Quotes

‘Make sure that we think about how you avoid those interminable loops that can cause real customer frustration, and ultimately, customer churn.’

“’Our focus is very much on optimising the channel… it could be anything from human-to-human interaction, right the way through to an SMS, and optimising the channel for the appropriate points in the customer journey. And there are clearly going to be points where the only way to achieve the end result is to have human to human interaction.”

“The new battleground for every business that we work with, is great customer engagement and great customer experience… you really are differentiated now, not necessarily on product features, but on customer experience.”

“We have all become so used to the Amazon experience, that it doesn't matter where in our lives we go. We're looking for that type of experience with every interaction with every company we work with.”

 

About the Guest

James Brown is the CEO of Smart Communications Ltd, a world-leading, cloud-based, customer communications provider. He previously ran SAS companies across various regulated industries, including Zinc Ahead, which provides commercial content management solutions to several of the world’s top pharmaceutical companies.

James Brown’s LinkedIn Profile: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/james-brown-7521323 

 

About the Host

Sarah Myerscough is the Sales and Marketing Director of Boston Tullis Group. The founder of The Insurance Brokers Podcast, she brings a wealth of marketing experience and a fresh perspective on marketing in the insurance sector. Boston Tullis works with insurance brokers to offer solutions to business development ceilings, particularly in the rapidly developing fields of video marketing and thought leadership.

 

Website: https://bostontullis.co.uk/ 

Evaluation Link: https://s.bostontullis.co.uk/s/podcastevaluation 

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Ultimately, there is no right or wrong personality type – each of them has a value and a powerful contribution to offer to the industry. This research is by no means conclusive or definitive, and indeed there may be other persona types prevalent within the market, or some of those outlined above could be fused together.   Best Moments/Key Quotes “[The Pure Specialist is] completely immersed in whatever it is that they have chosen as their specialism. It is their passion, as well as their career. They are usually quite disruptive, actually, because they don't want to settle for the status quo. They don't want to come up with a solution everyone else has got, they want to be ahead of the game.”   “One of the big findings of our research was that differentiation was a big reason as to why brokers would choose a specialism, so the Intentional Hybrid sees that and has the ability to have specialist areas within their general broking business.”   “The General Practitioner certainly doesn't shy away from specialism. But they don't pretend to be anything that they're not either. So, the GP is well connected, in terms of specialist suppliers, and invariably specialist insurers that they can bring in, they deliberately seek out these opportunities, but they don't try to build that capability themselves within their business.”   “The Organic Generalist is proud of the fact that they're a generalist. And the specialism for them is insurance placement, and managing and identifying insurance risk.”   Resources Ecclesiastical’s Whitepaper Report: https://ecclesiastical.com/documents/broker-specialist-roundtable-research.pdf   About the Guest Chris Withers is the Broker Distribution Director for Ecclesiastical Insurance. He has over 25 years of experience in the industry, having previously worked for Covea and RSA. Chris’ LinkedIn Profile: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/chris-withers-ab77761b    About the Host Sarah Myerscough is the Sales and Marketing Director of Boston Tullis Group. The founder of The Insurance Brokers Podcast, she brings a wealth of marketing experience and a fresh perspective on marketing in the insurance sector. Boston Tullis works with insurance brokers to offer solutions to business development ceilings, particularly in the rapidly developing fields of video marketing and thought leadership. If you would like Sarah to help you develop an integrated marketing strategy, using state of the art concepts, then please book a free 20 min call via Calendly.  Website: https://bostontullis.co.uk/  Evaluation Link: https://s.bostontullis.co.uk/s/podcastevaluation   
  • The Insurance Broker Podcast podcast

    070: Mental Health within the Insurance Broker market with Adrian Saunders, Commercial Director of Ecclesiastical Insurance

    27:00

    Good mental health is essential to our general wellbeing. Depending on how we manage it, it can be highly conducive, or deeply destructive to our productive output. As we gradually approach the aftermath of a world-changing pandemic, incorporating such awareness into the workplace, and indeed, all areas of our lives, has never been more urgent. In this special hybrid episode, the worlds of the Insurance Brokers Podcast and Coffee, Calm & Connection merge. We are delighted to be speaking with Adrian Saunders, Commercial Director of Ecclesiastical Insurance, which recently conducted its annual survey regarding mental health within the insurance broker market. In conversation with Boston Tullis’ Sarah Myerscough, he discusses the often-surprising results of the survey, which suggest that while considerable strides have been made towards boosting mental health awareness and support at work, there remains progress to be made.   Quote of the Episode “If, as most people have been doing, they've been working remotely, perhaps there's that sense of detachment where they don't feel able [to talk about mental health] … There's no observation going on. So, you know, there's probably less of managers actually seeing their teams, and seeing individuals, or being able to pick up any upon any signs, or just asking that question: ‘Are you okay?’” The experience of the pandemic completely shattered the way in which we work, our general sense of separation between our public and private lives, and the way we engage with others. In forcing us apart for so long, it could be argued that the pandemic eroded much of the progress being made towards greater mental health awareness and support within the workplace. The artificiality of a digital environment with which many of us were forced to acclimatise in order to continue working, while highly productive for some, left others feeling dejected and struggling to cope. Therefore, it is crucial that we understand the profound importance of providing mental health support in the workplace as we emerge from the chaos of multiple lockdowns, and enter 2022.   Key Takeaways ‘Less than half of people [now] feel comfortable talking about mental health in the workplace, whereas, back in 2019, it was actually really pretty high… three quarters of people felt comfortable.” Since 2019, Ecclesiastical Insurance has annually conducted a survey in order to identify general sentiments towards mental health within the insurance broker market, namely: How are people feeling? What are the causes of any mental health issues? How supported do brokers feel? How comfortable are they in talking about mental health at work? Several intriguing comparisons can be made between this year’s results and of those from 2019, pre-pandemic. A particularly concerning trend noted by Adrian in the episode was a significant drop in colleagues feeling comfortable with discussing mental health in the workplace, despite awareness of it and the provision of support for it reportedly increasing profoundly. Adrian suggests that this could be a result of remote working, due to which it isn’t necessarily as easy to share one’s private thoughts and feelings with a trusted colleague. Perhaps, also, this could be attributed to the pandemic, and our unanimous recognition that someone, somewhere, must have it worse than us, and therefore we may find our own problems folly or insignificant. This couldn’t be further from the truth. Everyone has problems, and they are all important and worth discussing with people you can trust. Therefore, we should endeavour to double down in our efforts to make the workplace a safe environment for employees to share their mental health woes, and from which they can receive valuable and meaningful support and advice. An additional problem highlighted by the survey was stress being at an all-time high among brokers. This could arguably be caused by our increased inability to separate work from our personal lives.  They have become deeply intertwined, perhaps irreversibly, particularly given the extent to which working from home has continued to prosper even as COVID regulations have relaxed in recent months. Adrian and Ecclesiastical’s UK intermediary leadership team have just completed their Mental Health First Aid training. If you would be interested in undergoing similar training, Adrian encourages brokers to speak with their account manager about it, or indeed to reach out to him directly.   Best Moments/Key Quotes “A really worrying trend that came through this time is quite a significant drop in individuals feeling able to talk about mental health issues in the workplace, especially being able to talk about it with their line manager. So, you've got this really interesting thing going on. The businesses are providing more support, there is more awareness. But at an individual level, people are feeling less able to actually talk about it. And when I say a drop, I don't mean just a few percentage points… it's almost a third of a drop since we started the survey in 2019.” “Myself and the intermediary leadership team in the UK, have all just completed our Mental Health First Aid training. And I think that's really important… If it means that we have one more conversation, or one better conversation, or somebody feels more able to come to any one of us to start that conversation, [then] that has been worth it.”   Resources Ecclesiastical Insurance – Adrian Saunders’ ‘About’ page: https://www.ecclesiastical.com/bios/adrian-saunders/ Ecclesiastical Insurance – Mental Health and Wellbeing Insights: https://www.ecclesiastical.com/insights/mental-health/ Ecclesiastical Insurance – ‘Work-related mental health issues for brokers are at their highest-ever recorded levels’: https://www.ecclesiastical.com/insights/broker-mental-health/ Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus: A Practical Guide for Improving Communication and Getting What You Want in Your Relationships by John Gray   About the Guest Adrian Saunders is the Commercial Director of Ecclesiastical Insurance. He’s worked in both the company and broker markets, and specialises in developing new enterprises within organisations, and re-engineering existing processes to develop strategy and increase ROL. Connect with the Guest: Adrian Saunders | LinkedIn Specialist Insurance & Financial Services | Ecclesiastical Ecclesiastical Insurance Group: Overview | LinkedIn   About the Host Sarah Myerscough is the Sales and Marketing Director of Boston Tullis Group. The founder of The Insurance Brokers Podcast, she brings a wealth of marketing experience and a fresh perspective on marketing in the insurance sector. Boston Tullis works with insurance brokers to offer solutions to business development ceilings, particularly in the rapidly developing fields of video marketing and thought leadership. If you would like Sarah to help you develop an integrated marketing strategy, using state of the art concepts, then please book a free 20 min call via Calendly.  Website: https://bostontullis.co.uk/  Evaluation Link: https://s.bostontullis.co.uk/s/podcastevaluation 
  • The Insurance Broker Podcast podcast

    069: The importance off curating an easy straightforward customer journey with Henry Newby - Superscript

    27:38

    Things are changing in the world of insurance. What can you do to stay ahead of the curve? How can you adapt your business in order to acclimatise to this new landscape, which has been changed forever by big tech companies such as Amazon and Google? In this episode, we’re thrilled to be speaking with Henry Newby, the Partnerships Director of Superscript, an innovative start-up insurance provider. Superscript recently announced a partnership with Amazon, to provide policies to British SMEs through the Business Prime subscription service. In conversation with Boston Tullis’ Sarah Myerscough, Henry elucidates the significance of simplifying the provision of insurance solutions in accordance with the culture of instant gratification facilitated by the business models of companies like Amazon. He highlights the importance of forming new, mutually beneficial business partnerships with other businesses, with whom you can share data and thereby provide a more streamlined, easily accessible service to your own clients.   Quote of the Episode ‘There is value in having a diversified distribution strategy’. Henry Newby asserts that business partnerships can create an array of new avenues for broadening product availability, and channels for their distribution. He notes that, while Superscript initially developed on a basis of paid acquisition, forming partnerships with businesses such as Amazon enabled the company to substantially expand its provision of quality cover, and to provide more nuanced solutions.  A particular area which substantially boosted Superscript’s distribution strategy is in its formation of partnerships with companies with data assets, which can be harnessed in order to actively support clients by ensuring that they always have the best possible cover.   Key Takeaways Throughout the episode, Henry repeatedly emphasises the importance of curating an easy, straightforward customer journey. A key means of doing so, he suggests, is by employing publicly available information about potential clients’ businesses in order to eliminate the need for them to manually input such information. This principle of streamlining and digitising the quote journey will become increasingly important in years to come. Superscript’s partnership with Amazon permits it, and other companies with similar agreements, to access the data which the tech giant holds about customers, and to use it to pre-fill certain fields within the quote journey. This underpins the importance of nimbility, which is once again the word of the week on the Insurance Broker’s Podcast. Insurers must aim to be flexible in their provision of cover, and in the ways with which they engage with clients, in order to stay ahead of the curve. A key means of doing so, Henry suggests, is to maintain a more consistent engagement with clients, but in a less arduous fashion than that which accompanies traditional quote journeys and renewal dates. The subscription model of Superscript is simple and automatic, following the same monthly payment principle of many services used by households across the country, such as Netflix , Spotify, or indeed Amazon itself. In doing so, there is both a more consistent dialogue with clients, and the ability to provide them with insight into the continued suitability of their cover, or lack thereof.   Best Moments/Key Quotes “What Amazon are looking to do is to acquire more businesses to their business prime proposition that it operates as a as a monthly subscription model… Once they've acquired those customers, obviously, they're looking to retain them over the longer term.” ‘We're able to effectively access some of the data that Amazon already holds about that customer and use that to pre fill certain fields within the quote journey itself’. ‘You can see that the cogs changing, you can see the moves going in the direction that you guys are going [towards].’ “We're looking to work with partners who are residing on data assets that we can utilise to improve the customer experience to inform product development, to enhance our pricing and underwriting capability, and also actually to support customers in terms of the ongoing management of their policies with us.” “We actually think that regular engagement with our customers is a good thing, not a bad thing. And part of that is actually about supporting them on an ongoing basis.”   Resources The Future of Insurance: From Disruption to Evolution by Bryan Falchuk The Second Curve: Thoughts on Reinventing Society by Charles Handy   About the Guest Prior to joining Superscript in 2018, of which he is the Partnerships Director, Henry Newby had 25 years of experience with working for large multinational insurance organisations. He previously worked as the Business Development Director for AXA UK for ten years, and spent 11 years in various roles at AON Warranty Group. Henry’s LinkedIn page: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/henry-newby-83756b2   About the Host Sarah Myerscough is the Sales and Marketing Director of Boston Tullis Group. The founder of The Insurance Brokers Podcast, she brings a wealth of marketing experience and a fresh perspective on marketing in the insurance sector. Boston Tullis works with insurance brokers to offer solutions to business development ceilings, particularly in the rapidly developing fields of video marketing and thought leadership. If you would like Sarah to help you develop an integrated marketing strategy, using state of the art concepts, then please book a free 20 min call via Calendly.  Website: https://bostontullis.co.uk/  Evaluation Link: https://s.bostontullis.co.uk/s/podcastevaluation 
  • The Insurance Broker Podcast podcast

    068: How data and technology is redefining the customer journey with Andrew Yates

    25:07

    Over the last ten years, the insurance industry has been utterly transformed by an array of technological advancements, but perhaps most profoundly by the amassing of publicly available digital data. It has quickly become apparent that such information can drive business intelligence, which can subsequently drive customer engagement, which in turn drives sales growth. Are you interested in the potential of data collection, analysis, and interpretation for your own business, but unsure of where to start? In this episode, we’re excited to be speaking with Andrew Yates, Founder and CEO of Artesian, a business intelligence software provider. In conversation with Boston Tullis’ Sarah Myerscough, he explains how data has redefined the buying cycle, the selling cycle, the customer journey, and customer expectations. It is this latter element which recurs throughout the episode, as Andrew explains how businesses must adapt to fulfil constantly evolving customer expectations in light of an increasingly digitised world.   Quote of the Episode “We've got to be knowledgeable about our customer, we've got to anticipate their need, and we've got to be ready to guide them, but at the same time, there will still value in that interaction if we get that right… there's still no substitute for, you know, getting to know your customer and getting it right.” Despite his role as a leading digital business intelligence provider, Andrew Yates remains certain that a carefully designed and unique customer journey is essential for maintaining and boosting your sales. He advocates the utilisation of technology for learning all that you can about your potential customer, in order to immediately solidify your reputation as a well-researched and trustworthy business partner. Andrew argues that, given the development of social media and a breadth of online data providers, it is a fundamental expectation of all customers that you should be well-informed about them before even meeting them. Thus, he suggests that using the available technology to acquire and interpret such information is not only time-saving, but can also accelerate your sales.   Key Takeaways Andrew suggests that the time for data conglomeration software such as that provided by Artesian isn’t in the future – it’s right now. Not only does this technology save time, but it also assists you in fulfilling the expectations of your current or potential customers. Therefore, in order to compete in the market, this type of data collection and interpretation will soon become vital. However, when you accumulate data, it needs to be carefully condensed and purified. Andrew compares it to crude oil, which only becomes truly valuable once it has been refined. This type of process is offered by services such as Artesian, which will become increasingly efficient in identifying important areas of consideration when forming new customer relationships in years to come. Andrew suggests that this data can become almost predictive, enabling brokers to be well-informed about companies or clients which will soon need to update their insurance, and act accordingly in a manner advantageous to both parties. Furthermore, this technology is easily accessible for an array of businesses, regardless of size or scope. Everyone can take advantage of it, and indeed, it will most likely become standard procedure across many industries over the next decade.   Best Moments/Key Quotes “I expect someone that's trying to sell me a product or a service to have done the research on my company or me. I just expect that now… This is the now, it's not the future… you've got to kind of get with it.” “I remember having a conversation with a gentleman, and he was what you’d call an old school broker. I remember him getting really upset with me about this idea… He said, “We don’t need to do research, we just build relationships.” And of course, he was right. But the beauty of what we do, and how simple we make that and how we make that work on an iPhone, is that anyone can take advantage of it. So, if you’re running a successful regional, even dare I say, kind of lifestyle business, this is for you.”   Resources https://artesian.co/   Insurance Insider article about the Superscript-Amazon partnership: https://www.insuranceinsider.com/article/2942huwbmlq6oncnfbpc0/amazon-teams-up-with-superscript-to-offer-insurance-to-uk-smes Artesian-DueDil Merger Announcement: https://artesian.co/artesian-duedil-merger/   About the Guest Andrew Yates is the Founder and CEO of Artesian, a sales intelligence solutions provider. The company recently merged with DueDil, a business intelligence platform focused on SME onboarding. He previously worked for Cognos, also a business intelligence software company which now a part of IBM. Andrew Yates’ LinkedIn Profile: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/apgyates  About the Host Sarah Myerscough is the Sales and Marketing Director of Boston Tullis Group. The founder of The Insurance Brokers Podcast, she brings a wealth of marketing experience and a fresh perspective on marketing in the insurance sector. Boston Tullis works with insurance brokers to offer solutions to business development ceilings, particularly in the rapidly developing fields of video marketing and thought leadership. If you would like Sarah to help you develop an integrated marketing strategy, using state of the art concepts, then please book a free 20 min call via Calendly.  Website: https://bostontullis.co.uk/  Evaluation Link: https://s.bostontullis.co.uk/s/podcastevaluation 
  • The Insurance Broker Podcast podcast

    067: Smart Communications – The future of top-class customer engagement with James Brown

    24:07

    Are you seeking to streamline the claim-making process, but unsure where to start? Are you struggling to keep up with your competitors, and looking to boost efficiency? Are you concerned by the emergence of instant gratification in business interactions, and determined not to be left in the dust? In this episode, we’re very pleased to be speaking with James Brown, CEO of Smart Communications. In conversation with Boston Tullis’ Sarah Myerscough, he explains the profound importance of great customer experience in order to accelerate your provision of insurance solutions, and to boost client retention. He suggests that while his company offers bespoke, software-based solutions, face-to-face communications will never cease to fuel high-quality customer experiences, and by providing a combination of both, businesses can stay ahead of the market.   Quote of the Episode ‘You should never ask the question of somebody that you should already know the answer to.’ James Brown argues that, when it comes to customer solutions, if a computer can do something you’re unable to, you should let it. The software offered by his business, Smart Communications, will locate all the necessary, publicly available data about a client to initiate the claims making process, and any remaining data will be inputted by the customer themselves. Consequently, the customer journey is simplified from the very start, which is essential for business growth and client retention. James suggests that any potential for customer frustration should be nipped in the bud, as ‘the vast majority of consumers out there have changed provider as a result of bad customer experience’. Key Takeaways In 2021, customers do not want to endure painstakingly slow and repetitious phone conversations with rudimentary robot data-collectors in order to make a claim. If a competitor is offering face-to-face consultations, or a wider range of digital solutions, customers will naturally switch to their cover. To prevent this, you should aim to optimise the available channels at your disposal, to guarantee that the most efficient and effective process is taking place during each stage of the customer journey. James clarifies that while a digital interface is often very important and useful, there are certain points in the customer journey that require a human-to-human interaction. Take care to ensure that when integrating digitised processes, either for data collection, customer feedback, and so on, they are employed at points during the customer journey when it is most fastidious to do so. Efficiency is key. We have all become highly accustomed to the Amazon experience, particularly throughout the COVID period. Our demands can be fulfilled with just the click of a button, and soon, James anticipates, this mentality will be transferred to various other businesses and industries. As Sarah suggests, we will soon want all our business procedures to be ‘frictionless, on my terms, on my time scale, and yesterday, please’. In the years to come, Artificial Intelligence will undoubtedly transform business efficiency and remove the human element from various procedures. However, the primary shift that James anticipates across various industries is towards great customer engagement via a wide range of communication means.   Best Moments/Key Quotes ‘Make sure that we think about how you avoid those interminable loops that can cause real customer frustration, and ultimately, customer churn.’ “’Our focus is very much on optimising the channel… it could be anything from human-to-human interaction, right the way through to an SMS, and optimising the channel for the appropriate points in the customer journey. And there are clearly going to be points where the only way to achieve the end result is to have human to human interaction.” “The new battleground for every business that we work with, is great customer engagement and great customer experience… you really are differentiated now, not necessarily on product features, but on customer experience.” “We have all become so used to the Amazon experience, that it doesn't matter where in our lives we go. We're looking for that type of experience with every interaction with every company we work with.”   About the Guest James Brown is the CEO of Smart Communications Ltd, a world-leading, cloud-based, customer communications provider. He previously ran SAS companies across various regulated industries, including Zinc Ahead, which provides commercial content management solutions to several of the world’s top pharmaceutical companies. James Brown’s LinkedIn Profile: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/james-brown-7521323    About the Host Sarah Myerscough is the Sales and Marketing Director of Boston Tullis Group. The founder of The Insurance Brokers Podcast, she brings a wealth of marketing experience and a fresh perspective on marketing in the insurance sector. Boston Tullis works with insurance brokers to offer solutions to business development ceilings, particularly in the rapidly developing fields of video marketing and thought leadership.   Website: https://bostontullis.co.uk/  Evaluation Link: https://s.bostontullis.co.uk/s/podcastevaluation 
  • The Insurance Broker Podcast podcast

    066: SME’s, the UK’s economic backbone, but how are they faring? – with David Perry

    25:51

    Whether you work in a large corporate broker, or a small provincial, David Perry has that T-shirt and has some wise words to say about how the SME market is faring.   Quote of the Episode: “I think that one of the things that we all have to remember about smaller firms is that quite often, the proprietor is the finance director, HR director, health and safety specialist, IT and systems person and has to deal with all of the conduct and compliance as well. And then when he's not, or she is not doing all of those things, has to actually go and sell whatever it is that they're providing"   Resources Home - British Insurance Brokers' Association (biba.org.uk) FSB |The Federation of Small Businesses | FSB, The Federation of Small Businesses David Perry - Managing Director - FSB Insurance Service | LinkedIn   About The Guest David Perry has been round the insurance industry a long time running small and start up brokerages as well as some time with a big consolidator. An inveterate committee joiner, he is incredibly well placed to discuss the issues facing small firms generally, and small brokers particularly.   About the Host Sarah Myerscough is the Sales and Marketing Director of Boston Tullis Group. The founder of The Insurance Brokers Podcast, she brings a wealth of marketing experience and a fresh perspective on marketing in the insurance sector. Boston Tullis works with insurance brokers to offer solutions to business development ceilings, particularly in the rapidly developing fields of video marketing and thought leadership. If you would like Sarah to help you develop an integrated marketing strategy, using state of the art concepts, then please book a free 20 min call via Calendly  CONNECT WITH SARAH https://www.facebook.com/bostontullis   https://www.linkedin.com/company/bostontullis/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarahmyerscough/ https://bostontullis.co.uk/ HOSTED BY: Sarah Myerscough, [email protected] mobile: 07821903628  

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