All Things Iceland podcast

All Things Iceland

Jewells Chambers

Discover Iceland’s language, history, culture, & nature

103 Episodes

  • All Things Iceland podcast

    5 Things That Have Made Immigrant Life in Iceland Easier For Me

    21:11

    Immigrant life in Iceland has surprisingly been a smooth transition for me. I think part of that has to do with the fact that there are certain things in the country that have made living here easy. Of course it is important to mention that what I point out in this episode are based on my own experience and will vary from person to person. In this podcast episode, I go over 5 specific things that come to mind when I think about what has made immigrant life in Iceland easier as I continue to learn and adjust to the country. Taxes for Expats Thank you to Taxes for Expats for sponsoring this podcast episode. I’m incredibly grateful for this awesome tax service because they make my life a million times easier when it comes time to file in the US. Their online platform is intuitive, and you get matched up with a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) that thoroughly works on your taxes to make sure you are fully compliant regarding filing your taxes. Every year, it is a headache for me to get it done but not anymore because I know I can rely on Taxes for Expats to handle the paperwork for me. Here is the list of the 5 things that make immigrant life easier that I talk about in the episode: Getting my taxes down by Taxes for Expats - crucial for immigrant life if you want to stay compliant with the tax laws in your home countryHaving community (in-person and online)Seeing familiar products from the US in stores in IcelandEnglish is widely spoken hereBeing able to get shipments for a good price via iHerb.comI often get asked by people from around the world how they can move to Iceland. It varies for everyone, but I recommend checking out this video to get an idea of what visas are available to you and much more.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJJZdsXsFus Random Fact of the Episode One of the funny things to me is that I have totally taken on the habit of Icelanders where they bring an empty suitcase with them when they go on vacation. It is often so expensive to buy clothes and certain products here, that it can be less expensive to buy a plane ticket and bulk shop for things out of the country. Icelandic Word of the Episode Innflytjandi - immigrant Share this post Share on facebook Facebook Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on twitter Twitter Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega.Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Exclusive interview with the President of Iceland: Guðni Th. Jóhannesson

    1:27:43

    2021 has been such an interesting year for me and I was just as shocked as anyone that I was able to interview the President of Iceland, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson. I talk about how the opportunity to interview Guðni during the podcast episode because it is quite unusual. The President was very kind to answer all of my questions, including the questions that the members of the All Things Iceland Patreon submitted. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTJo-K3_PV8&t=1s Here are the questions I asked the President of Iceland during the interview: What motivated you to run for President of Iceland in 2016?  Can you explain a bit about what your duties are, and what kind of power you do have in the Icelandic government? -  What have you learned from previous Icelandic Presidents What is most challenging about being President of Iceland? How has COVID impacted your Presidency? What He likes about being President of Iceland The myths about Iceland he wants to debunk The President’s favorite history about Bessastaðir (The Icelandic President’s Residence) Has there been anything interesting and/or strange that have you experienced since leaving behind your life as an ordinary citizen and becoming the head of the Icelandic state? One of the most surprising things I read about you is you’re a very distant cousin of Barack Obama. Was it shocking to you when you found that out? Also, have you met the Obamas? What is your favorite Icelandic word or phrase? Questions From my patrons on Patreon Before assuming the office of the president you had an academic background in Icelandic history. When you leave office what do you think you will focus on studying or writing about? As an individual who has translated the works of Stephen King into Icelandic what is your favorite work by the Author? Is there any literature you would love to see translated that has not been? Join the All Things Iceland Patreon Community Some of you might be aware that one of my goals for the podcast is to travel around Iceland more to interview different people in each region. In July 2020, I set up the All Things Iceland community on Patreon. It’s a membership platform that was founded in 2013. It allows or creators like me to provide exclusive content to listeners like you in exchange for a monthly subscription. Each month I am doing Ask Me Anything videos, Live Chats, and Folklore Friday each week. Sometimes I do updates about my life in Iceland. I do not share this content on any other channel. The support from my patrons on the All Things Iceland community on Patreon will help to evolve All Things Iceland. There are several membership tiers to choose from and each tier has a variety of benefits. If you would like to join the community, go to patreon.com/allthingsiceland. I look forward to having you join. Share this post Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega. Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
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    Discussing Iceland’s Recent National Election and Socialism with Sæþór

    2:04:22

    During this sit down with Sæþór Randalsson about the recent election in Iceland and his involvement with socialism in Iceland was quite insightful. More than a year ago, I interviewed Sæþór about his move from the United States many years ago and you check it out here. The beginning of this episode focuses on Sæþór sharing about how the Icelandic Parliament is set up. After all the ballots from the election are counted, coalitions of the parties that have seats in Parliament are formed. Well, the goal is that coalitions are formed but that can sometimes take more than one go for that to happen. After that breakdown, Sæþór talks about Socialism and why he is running for a Parliamentary position with the Socialis party. Many people who are not familiar with how Iceland is governed often assume that there is socialism is widely practised in Icelandic society instead understanding there is a mix of socialism and capitalism here. Join the All Things Iceland Community on Patreon Some of you might be aware that one of my goals for the podcast is to travel around Iceland more to interview different people in each region. In July, I set up the All Things Iceland community on Patreon. It’s a membership platform that was founded in 2013. It allows for creators like me to provide exclusive content to listeners like you in exchange for a monthly subscription. Each month I am doing Ask Me Anything videos, Live Chats, and Folklore Friday each week. Sometimes I do updates about my life in Iceland. I do not share this content on any other channel. The support from my patrons on the All Things Iceland community on Patreon will help to evolve All Things Iceland. There are several membership tiers to choose from and each tier has a variety of benefits. If you would like to join the community, go to patreon.com/allthingsiceland. I look forward to having you join. Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega. Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Is the Blue Lagoon in Iceland Worth Visiting?

    20:59

    Iceland’s Blue Lagoon was established in the 1990s, but it’s a much different experience now than its humble beginnings. Over the decades the Blue Lagoon went from being a bathing facility whose water run off from a nearby power plant soothed the skin of patients with psoriasis to being one of the most well known spas in the world. When travelers to Iceland are planning their trips, I often get asked if the Blue Lagoon is worth visiting. I totally understand that some “must see” places can be overhyped, so I dedicated this short podcast episode to giving you my opinion on if it is worth it to visit this famous spa. Different Passes for the Blue Lagoon + In-water Massage During the episode I go over the different passes available, the cost of each pass (comfort and premium) and what they include. I also include my experience with the in-water massage that is available as an add-on to any pass that you buy, if you decide to visit. I do not include an opinion about the Blue Lagoon’s Retreat Spa, a newer and much more expensive option than the other passes, because I’ve not experienced it. When I do try out the Retreat Spa, I will definitely share my thoughts in a separate episode.I think the most important things for anyone to keep in mind when making decisions about activities in Iceland are their budget and what kind of experiences they feel are worth splurging on. For many, visiting the Blue Lagoon is an essential part of experiencing Iceland and I think that is a fair view point.I hope this podcast episode has helped to give you some insight on whether the Blue Lagoon is worth it for you when you visit the country. If you have already visited this spa in Iceland, I'd love to hear what your experience was like in the comments. Subscribe the All Things Iceland Newsletter Don't miss out on announcements of special content for those planning a trip to Iceland. Click Here Random Fact of the Episode Before the most recent renovations at the Blue Lagoon, you used to be able to hand scoop your own silica masks from buckets placed in areas around the lagoon. With the new upgrades, you get your mask from an attendant, plus other available masks based on your skin's sensitivities. The nice thing about having an attendant give you the mask is that you know no one else has been putting their hands in it. Icelandic Word of the Episode Bláa lónið - Blue Lagoon Share This Post Share on pinterest Pinterest Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega.Thank you for kindly for listening and reading, and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Escaped Being a Child Bride to Thriving in Iceland – Najmo Fiyasko

    1:11:40

    Najmo Fiyasko’s story of growing up in Somalia and her escape from being a child bride there caught my attention when I saw her on the cover of a newspaper in Iceland. I was shocked to learn that she had been through so much at such a young age. I still have the newspaper that featured her because I just knew that one day I would interview her. The funny thing is that one fateful day she friended me on Facebook and we eventually started to chat. I was elated when she agreed to be interviewed because I wanted as many people as possible to hear about what she has overcome and the inspiration she is today. Here are some of the questions I asked Najmo Fiyasko during the interview: You went through so much at such a young age while living in Somalia. Can you share about what you had to endure and why you eventually fled to Iceland? What was your experience like when you arrived in Iceland?  What was it like adjusting to life here? How was it for you to learn the language? Were there any customs or foods that were strange or shocking to you? You’re doing such amazing work on your social media platforms by raising awareness about female genital mutilation, and rights for women and girls. Your content is in Somali and you have gained quite a large following. What is the reaction from Somali’s when you talk about these topics? Where to follow and support Najmo Fiyasko and her nonprofit women's media organisation Check out the Mid Show website to learn more and donate Follow on the Mid Show on Facebook  Subscribe to the the Mid Show on YouTube  Follow the Mid Show on Instagram Share this post Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Join the All Things Iceland Patreon Community Some of you might be aware that one of my goals for the podcast is to travel around Iceland more to interview different people in each region. In July, I set up the All Things Iceland community on Patreon. It’s a membership platform that was founded in 2013. It allows for creators like me to provide exclusive content to listeners like you in exchange for a monthly subscription. Each month I am doing Ask Me Anything videos, Live Chats, and Folklore Friday each week. Sometimes I do updates about my life in Iceland. I do not share this content on any other channel. The support from my patrons on the All Things Iceland community on Patreon will help to evolve All Things Iceland. There are several membership tiers to choose from and each tier has a variety of benefits. If you would like to join the community, go to patreon.com/allthingsiceland. I look forward to having you join. Let's Be Social. Here is where you can connect with me. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega. Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    5 Incredibly Fun Rainy Day Activities in Reykjavík For All Ages

    22:50

    Reykjavík and the rest of Iceland has gained a reputation for having many rainy days. While I’m an advocate for going out and dressing well no matter the weather, sometimes it is better to stay inside. Well, if you have to be indoors why not make it fun? The five interactive places I talk about in this episode are so much fun that they will make you forget all about the weather. An Experience Like No Other in Reykjavík I’m excited to have FlyOver Iceland as the sponsor of this podcast episode and video. I remember experiencing this interactive ride back when it first opened and I was blown away. As explained in the podcast episode, there are three distinct parts to the experience. First, you enter a Viking longhouse and hear an Icelandic storyteller explain about Vikings and settlers that came to the country. Next, you go into the Well of Time. In this room, an Icelandic troll uses their magical powers to show you visually and through music about the history of Iceland and its people.Last but not least, is the simulated flying experience. After strapping in, you feel like you’re flying over some of the remote parts of the country. It’s an incredible experience because there is wind, mist, and the seats are moving like we are in an airplane. Everyone I know who has been there, including my mother, has raved about it. I highly recommend this incredibly fun activity in Reykjavík. Subscribe to the All Things Iceland Newsletter Don't miss out on announcements of special content for those planning a trip to Iceland. Click Here 5 Rainy Day Activities To Do in Reykjavík FlyOver Iceland- 3 parts of the experience – Viking Longhouse, The Well of Time and the ride itselWhales of Iceland – 23 life sized and handmade replicas of whalesMaritime Museum – (Sjóminjasafnið ) -Fish and Folk, Dutch Merchant Shipwreck in the 1700s and Óðinn coastguard ship, which fought in the Cod Wars.Aurora Reykjavík – Northern Lights Center folklore about the northern lights from different cultures, how the northern lights work – the science behind them, a comfy theater where you can watch northern lights footage.Valdís Ice creamhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Vsy0xeVKgw Share This Post Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Random fact of the episode According to the website Reykjavík ClimaTemps.com, there are, On average there are 213 days per year with more than 0.1 mm (0.004 in) of rainfall (precipitation) or 17.8 days with a quantity of rain, sleet, snow etc. per month. Reykjavík ClimaTemps Word of the episode Rigning - rain Let's Be Social. Here is where we can connect. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega.Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    7 Ways Iceland Can Kill You – Simple Tips to Save Your Life

    25:35

    While it might seem a little morbid to talk about how Iceland can kill you, the intention of this podcast episode and blog post is to spread awareness. Icelandic nature is absolutely gorgeous but there are plenty of dangerous situations that can be life threatening. In this episode, I’m sharing seven ways that can lead to death here. I include some examples of people who have unfortunately perished.Please remember to check safetravel.is before heading out on an adventure in Iceland. This site has updates about weather warnings, road closures and more. Join My Newsletter Subscribe to the All Things Iceland Newsletter Don't miss out on announcements of special content for those planning a trip to Iceland. Click Here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESUKvNhorgM 7 Ways Iceland Can Kill You Volcanos  - stepping on the lava or getting too close to when there are a dangerous amount of gases in the airBad weather - wind or snow stormsDying of exposureStepping into a boiling hot mud poolFalling off a cliff of a mountain or waterfall for a picture or a curious lookSneaker waves on Icelandic beachesStopping in the middle of the road to take photos. How to Pack for Icelandic Weather in Any Season Regardless of the season, Icelandic weather can vary. It's common to experience what feels like different seasons within the same day.Most people that visit Iceland are not familiar with how to properly layer their clothes. That is why I created a free Ultimate Packing Checklist for Iceland. It breaks down all of the essential items you need for winter and summer. I also included non-essential items that can be helpful if you have room to pack them and outfit ideas if you plan to go out to dinner or party in Reykjavík. Share this post Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Random Fact of the Episode The Icelandic Search & Rescue teams are voluntary organizations. I go into more detail about them in the episode and how they raise money to keep in operation so they can save lives. Icelandic Word of the Episode hætta - danger Join the All Things Iceland Patreon Community Some of you might be aware that one of my goals for the podcast is to travel around Iceland more to interview different people in each region. In July, I set up the All Things Iceland community on Patreon. It’s a membership platform that was founded in 2013. It allows for creators like me to provide exclusive content to listeners like you in exchange for a monthly subscription.Each month I am doing Ask Me Anything videos, Live Chats, and Folklore Friday each week. Sometimes I do updates about my life in Iceland. I do not share this content on any other channel. The support from my patrons on the All Things Iceland community on Patreon will help to evolve All Things Iceland. There are several membership tiers to choose from and each tier has a variety of benefits.If you would like to join the community, go to patreon.com/allthingsiceland. I look forward to having you join. Let's Be Social. Here is where you can connect with me. Instagram Youtube Facebook Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega.Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon!
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Iceland‘s Most Underrated Area: The Beautiful Reykjanes Peninsula

    1:08:47

    Whether it‘s your first or fifth time visit Iceland, I think you will find my what I share about the Reykjanes Peninsula in this podcast episode to be quite exciting. This peninsula is a UNESCO Global GeoPark. Free Itinerary for the Reykjanes Peninsula Free Itinerary for the Reykjanes Peninsula Grab my free itinerary for the Reykjanes Peninsula. It gives you all the names and links of places and activities that I experienced on my adventure in this amazing place. Click Here According to the unesco.org wesbite, UNESCO Global GeoParks, ...are single, unified geographical areas where sites and landscapes of international geological significance are managed with a holistic concept of protection, education and sustainable development." unesco.org I’ve had the pleasure of exploring different parts of the Reykjanes Peninsula and I even did a podcast episode about this place years ago. The difference between that episode and this one is that I recently did a three-day trip exploring this amazing place. In fact, I partnered with Visit Reykjanes for this podcast episode to bring you an amazing guide to how you can enjoy this  area that I feel is the most underrated in the country. It still surprises me that so many people visit the iconic Blue Lagoon, the current erupting volcano, and come through Kelflavík international airport, which are all on the peninsula. However, they have no idea about all the amazing natural wonders, food, accommodations and activities that are right under their noses. While it is a shame, I will admit that it is nice to visit all of these places without many people being there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsiJ0rhY_g4 Day One of Our Reykjanes Peninsula Adventure Day one was a bit of a beast in that we packed in a lot of activities. If you end up watching the video for this, you will see some drastically different weather on day one. There were parts of the peninsula where it was raining and other parts where it was blue skies and dry. It was a bizarre weather day, but we used it to our advantage. Well, to the best of our abilities. Seltún Geothermal Area Hot Spring Snorkleing at Kleifarvatn Lake Dinner at Café Bryggjan Lighthouse Inn Accommodations Hvaleneskirkja Church The Bridge Between Continents Stampar Craters Reykjanesviti Lighthouse & Karlinn Rock Gunnuhver Hot Springs Day Two on The Reykjanes Peninsula Reykjanes Sea Kayaking in Vogar Hjá Höllu Restaurant Foraging for seaweed with Eydís Mary Jónsdóttir 4x4 Adventures Hotel Berg Day Three on the Reykjanes Peninsula Breakfast at Hotel Berg Rokksafn - The Rock and Roll Museum The Blue Lagoon Hérastubbur Bakery Hot Stuff WWII Memorial Random Fact of the Episode During the episode, I talk about a kind of funny and unfortunate event that happened to me on the last day of this adventure in the parking lot of the Rock and Roll Museum. Icelandic Word of the Episode Vanmeta - underestimate Share this post Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Let's be social! Here is where you can connect with me. Instagram Youtube Facebook
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Celebrating 5 Years of Living & Traveling in Iceland

    45:28

    It’s so hard to believe that I am celebrating 5 years of living and traveling in Iceland this month. June is special to me because a lot of major events in my life have happened during this month. Some I have control over, such as moving to Iceland in 2016, getting married, and  starting the podcast three years ago, so I’m celebrating those anniversaries too. One thing that I don’t think I had any control over is that I was born in June. This is a kind of random fact but I was supposed to be born on May 16th but my mom said I was not ready to come and I ended up being born a month later on June 16th. Maybe I had more control over that than I thought. Anyway, as you can see there is a lot to celebrate this month Join My Newsletter Subscribe to the All Things Iceland Newsletter Don't miss out on the announcement of special content for those planning a trip to Iceland. Subscribe here Five years feels special to me because I’ve been fortunate enough to learn, travel and grow as a person in Iceland throughout this time. I’ve met some amazing people, gone to gorgeous places and had the opportunity to share some of them with all of you, whether it’s on the All Things Iceland podcast, YouTube channel, Instagram or Facebook. The funny thing is that I have so much that I haven’t been able to share because there is not enough time in the day to put all the content.Living and traveling in Iceland for the last 5 years, podcasting for the last three years and running a Youtube channel about Iceland, I’ve amassed a lot of knowledge about this amazing place. While it would be great to share all of what I’ve learned, it would take a very long time to do that. So, I’ve chosen 10 things I’ve learned in the last 5 years to share.Random side note, here is the Farm Life Iceland video, where I followed Pálína around on her family's sheep farm. Now let’s jump into the 10 things that I’ve learned after living in Iceland for the last 5 years. No place looks and feels the same even after visiting it multiple timesMy perception of Iceland has changed a lotThe taste of black liquorice has started to grow on me. Please don’t tell my husband.As much as I have traveled here, I’m constantly finding new places to see, new foods to try and amazing people to meetThe diversity of people is amazing.Icelandic is still challenging and I continue to learnBeing plant based/vegan is amazingly easy here.Budgeting has became so much more necessary after living here.After moving, I’ve grown a lot as an adult, a partner to Gunnar and as a creative person.I see the word differently now after living here. Random Fact of the episode I only started hiking when I came to Iceland. In the podcast, I talk about my first hiking experience in the country with Icelandic mountaineers, which was intense. Icelandic word of the episode umbreytast - transformation Share this post Share on facebook Facebook Share on twitter Twitter Share on pinterest Pinterest Þakka þér kærlega fyrir að hlusta (og að lesa) og sjáumst fljótlega.Thank you kindly for listening (and reading) and see you soon! Let's be social! Here is where you can connect with me. Instagram Youtube Facebook
  • All Things Iceland podcast

    Iceland’s Rich Geothermal Bathing Culture – Learn The History, Culture & Etiquette

    This episode is all about the Icelandic geothermal bathing culture in Iceland. Many of you might be aware that Icelanders love to soak in a hot tub no matter the weather. However, you might not be aware of some of the history, modern day culture and etiquette involved with this tradition. Before I jumped into it, I’m excited to announce that this episode is sponsored by the new Sky Lagoon geothermal spa in Reykjavík. I have to point out that I only like to promote places or things that I have personally gone to or used and can vouch for the experience. I will share some insight a little later in the episode about the Sky Lagoon because I was blown away by this new geothermal spa.  A Little History About Icelander's Geothermal Bathing Culture Bathing in a geothermal pool in Iceland is a national pastime, and the origins of this activity dates back to the settlement times. When farmers from Norway came to Iceland, they found that there was an abundance of hot water coming out of the earth in different areas of the country. Washing clothes and soaking in natural Icelandic geothermal pools were two of the most common uses. The heat and steam from the geothermal water were also used to make delicious Icelandic bread called rúgbrauð.Iceland’s harsh weather takes a toll on the skin and those with skin conditions found that soaking in the warm water seemed to alleviate some symptoms. Because the water from geothermal sources is often rich with minerals, it can provide healing properties for those that immerse in it. Iceland’s Most Famous & Historical Man Made Geothermal Bathing Pool Snorri Sturluson, a revered Icelandic historian, poet and politician, had a man made geothermal bathing pool in Reykholt back in the 13th century. It is aptly named Snorralaug, which translates to Snorri’s pool and is fed hot water by the nearby hot spring Skrifla.. What’s even more interesting is that Snorri had a tunnel built that went from his house straight to the pool so he could be sheltered to and from his beloved geothermal bathing pool. I visited this location in the summer of 2020 and the pool is beautiful. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to bathe in it today because the hot water that fills the pool can sometimes be scolding hot. While Snorralaug was once thought to be used only by Snorri, it appears that this pool was mentioned in the Landnáma, or book of settlement, back in the 10th century. Of course, it was not called Snorralaug back then but the pool in the book of settlements was in the same location. Modern Day Icelandic Bathing Culture While it is still possible and quite fun to bathe in natural geothermal hot springs out in Icelandic nature, the majority of Icelanders opt for local pools and spas. These facilities provide a comfortable place to change, lockers to store your things securely, showers to clean off, and a relaxing place to gather. Many of these places still use geothermal energy but it’s a major upgrade from what their ancestors used.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LceJtnzj_0&t=12s Sky Lagoon Iceland - Incorporating Icelandic Geothermal Bathing Culture & the Modern Spa Experience And this is what brings me to talk more about our sponsor for this episode, which is the new gorgeous Sky Lagoon in Reykjavík. I had the amazing opportunity to check out the Sky Lagoon the weekend it opened. If I recall correctly, it opened on Friday, April 30th and we went on Sunday, May 2nd. What’s nice is that it is only about a 10 minute drive from the downtown area. This new geothermal spa in Iceland is unique because they have incorporated Icelandic culture and history into the experience.I was blown away by how beautiful the facilities are and how thoughtful the architects were when they designed the place. For starters, the outside of the building was made using Icelandic turf, which is essentially dirt and grass. That is how Icelanders made their homes for centuries after...

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