2 Minute Jazz podcast

2 Minute Jazz

Open Studio

Acclaimed jazz pianist Peter Martin and other Open Studio artists break it down in 2 minutes. Learn the many techniques you need to know to play interesting and inspired jazz music. A podcast from Open Studio - "Jazz Lessons from Jazz Legends."

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124 Episodes

  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    Stop F%*#ing Up Footprints - Peter Martin | 2 Minute Jazz

    2:43

    Peter Martin shows you how to fix three common mistakes people make when playing Wayne Shorter's classic standard "Footprints."For full length piano lessons with Peter Martin, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/piano========================================================What's going on? Peter Martin here for Two Minute Jazz. What is that? That's the correct introduction to "Footprints." It's a wonderful tune from Wayne Shorter that is often butchered. But we're gonna fix that today. I'm gonna talk to you about how to stop playing this tune wrong. I'm gonna give you three major errors in this and how to fix them.The first is that bassline and that little counter-melody. It's even part of the melody. Anticipate it, one, two, three... Okay, so you've gotta get that part of the melody right as anticipation and the bassline needs to be on the beat.You can always leave it later on, but let's start there. Then the next part, F minor, again, we can play whatever we want, but the original stays on that drone, that pedal point C is F minor over C, not F minor. Alright... And it's not perfect fourths, that's a different song. Now can you play that? Sure, you can play whatever you want, but know the original first, okay? So get the right bassline.All right, the third major thing we're gonna fix today is the changes on the bridge. F sharp half diminished but with that major ninth. And you gotta know the melody and how it lays. Then we go to F13 because that's part of the melody, sharp 11. So F# half diminished with the ninth, natural ninth, F13 sharp eleven, and now we've got E9 with the flatted fifth. Not... or sharp nine. I mean, you can play that, but that's not what Herbie played on the original, on Adam's Apple. And then we got A7 sharp nine flat 13. Then we got blues comin' down.Okay, fix those three things and you will be jammin' on Wayne Shorter's "Footprints." Happy practicing.========================================================Website: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    One Great Bossa Nova Technique - Helio Alves | 2 Minute Jazz

    2:22

    Brazilian jazz pianist Helio Alves shows you a useful tip on how to get a great texture for your bossa nova piano playing.For full-length piano lessons with Helio Alves, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/brazilian-jazz-piano========================================================Hi everybody, Helio Alves here with Two Minute Jazz. One great texture for playing bossa nova piano is to play the whole groove in your left hand, and play the melody (or solo) in your right hand. An important thing to remember is the quarter notes that always have to be there, they always have to be present. Very important part of the groove. That can be with or without the roots of the chord. Basically the technique works like this: with shell voicings, like the root 6 and 3rd or root 7 and 3rd.So the quarter notes are very important. They're always there. I'm anticipating the chords, too. Without a bass note. The quarter notes are there. So that's a very cool technique to play bossa nova, very nice texture and very useful. Thank you again for listening. Happy practicing!========================================================Website: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

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  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    How to Play the Maracatu - Edu Ribeiro | 2 Minute Jazz

    3:49

    Edu Ribeiro teaches you the technique he uses to play one of the most common drum patterns in Brazilian jazz: the maracatu.For full-length drum lessons with Edu Ribeiro, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/brazilian-jazz-drumming========================================================Hi, I am Edu Ribeiro and welcome to Two Minute Jazz. I'm here now to talk about maracatu. Maracatu is everything from the Northeast of Brazil, from Recife. And it's so hard to play on the drum set because the coordination is difficult. We have to bring the lines of the percussion for the drum set. And they have three special voices that you have put together in this instrument.The first one, and I think the easiest one, is the snare drum, which is just sixteenth notes playing with a little swing, from that part of Brazil.We have the alfaia, that's the huge instrument that you play with two sticks.I can't play that tom and that snare together, and I will try to imitate that with my bass drum. Just with the special and the principle notes from here. I will put the snare drum and the bass drum together.And there is another important voice of the percussion: that is the agogô. That is the most famous line of this percussion. I don't have the agogô here, and I'm trying to play the agogô from the floor tom and the rack tom to make the different types of sound.Okay, and I will put together with the bass drum. Note that I play the hi-hat just on the quarter note, on the time. And I did a different sticking for the snare drum to play the right hand with rack tom and floor tom, and the left hand imitating the snare drum.Okay, happy practicing, and see you next time.========================================================Website: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    The RIGHT Way to Practice Pentatonics - Peter Martin | 2 Minute Jazz

    2:52

    Did you know that you're probably practicing pentatonic scales the wrong way? Peter Martin shows you an exercise to fix your fingering.For full length piano lessons with Peter Martin, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/piano========================================================What's goin' on everybody? Peter Martin here for 2 Minute Jazz. Want to talk to you about pentatonics. I've got a brand new exercise for you over C minor, or E flat major, however you wanna think about it. And we go through two different levels, three different rhythms for each one. The first thing we're doing, we're starting down here, an octave below middle C. Too many of you are practicing only in this [upper] range of the instrument and then you end up soloing only in these two octaves. We got great stuff down here. Great little tenor region of the piano we wanna explore. So if you wanna play it, you gotta practice in there, okay?So we're going up. And then we're (on four) coming down and here's our shape, skipping. Lots of use of the four. A lot of you are just playing with one two three and there's some false information goin' out here that you only have to use three fingers. We've got five fingers. If you're not gonna practice with the fourth and the fifth, they're never gonna get strong and independent and be able to at least come close to equaling one two three.So many situations, what we have to be able to play with strength and agility with our fourth and fifth finger, so we gotta practice it. So I've worked that into the fingering here. And we're just changing up the rhythm.Level 2A, same thing: goin' up straight. Pentatonic. Now we gotta new shape. And this is really based upon something a lot of players use. That's just going up a half step. So it gets your hand ready for that. And now we're introducing a lot of fifth finger. A lot of you are gonna wanna go four or three there. But the idea is we wanna keep that wrist smoothly gliding up and down.Pentatonics. Happy practicing!========================================================Website: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    Building the Brazilian Baião - Helio Alves | 2 Minute Jazz

    2:12

    Helio Alves shows you how to imitate the percussion instruments that are essential to a tight baião rhythm.For full-length piano lessons with Helio Alves, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/brazilian-jazz-piano========================================================Hi everybody, Helio Alves here for Two Minute Jazz. The baião rhythm is a rhythm from the northeast of Brazil and has this basic pattern played by percussion instruments and accordion that's very important for this particular style.And a typical sound of the baião is this type of sound, which you have the basic percussion pattern in your left hand and the accordion patterns in your right hand. And it sounds like this with a lot of 16th notes, a lot of syncopation.Another characteristic of this style is the Lydian flat seven scale that's very commonly used.Thank you very much for listening. Happy practicing! See you soon.========================================================Website: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    The Real Samba Rhythm - Edu Ribeiro | 2 Minute Jazz

    3:35

    Modern Brazilian jazz monster Edu Ribeiro demonstrates how to take the samba school to the drum kit.For full-length drum lessons with Edu Ribeiro, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/brazilian-jazz-drumming========================================================Hi, I am Edu Ribeiro and welcome to Two Minute Jazz. Today, we are going to talk about samba. Bringing the lines of the percussion from the drum set, we have three special lines to put together here.The first one is the most important for the samba, and that's the surdo that keeps the time for everybody. And the surdo can be very simple, or it could be a little syncopated, but it's going to be hard to imitate with the bass drum. So it could be played less syncopated.The other instrument is the tambourine, the small instrument that people play in the school of samba. But we have a special clav like that. I'm going to try to put together the tambourine and the bass drum imitating the surdo.And another one that I'm going to play is the pandeiro that people play with two hands. I'm going to try to play all the sixteenth notes with my right hand on my hi-hat. Then I'll try to put it all together.There is another instrument called the agogô. I'm going to try to imitate two songs with my tom and my floor tom.Okay, happy practicing and see you next time!========================================================Website: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    Diatonic Fourth Shapes - Peter Martin | 2 Minute Jazz

    2:56

    Tired of using the same old piano voicings when playing ballads? Peter Martin shows you some new shapes to shake things up.For full length piano lessons with Peter Martin, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/piano========================================================What's going on everybody? Peter Martin here for Two Minute Jazz. Hope you're doing well. Got a quick tip to you today on diatonic fourth voicings. Just playing around a little on "If I Should Lose You" and I was just thinking about the uses for this on ballads. But even if we take the tempo up. If we look at like a basic fourth voicing over G minor. Three notes in the right hand, two in the left hand. If you have the ability to move through this and really all the different scales with this shape diatonically, you're gonna have some nice things that can happen. For your comping, for your soloing, for a lot of things.So, these are all fourths on the Dorian, right? Starting on the root. So, you wanna have that in all the different keys. And kind of understand them, like that's over F minor. But it works in fourths over E flat major. So, if you're on like a ballad. You're moving in and out of them but that's the foundation is that diatonic. If you combine that with an understanding of a chromatic, you're really getting somewhere.And you can think about these melodically as shapes too. But you gotta have a handle on all those, right? In all your different keys so that you can do that.All right, have fun with that. Diatonic fourths. Peace. Happy practicing.========================================================#2minjazz #openstudio #petermartin #jazz #piano #happypracticing #diatonic #fourth #shapesWebsite: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    The Secret to Getting the Brazilian Feel - Edu Ribeiro | 2 Minute Jazz

    2:49

    Edu Ribeiro reveals an exercise he created to add some swinging 16th notes in samba patterns.For full length drum lessons with Edu Ribeiro, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/brazilian-jazz-drumming========================================================Hi, I am Edu Ribeiro and welcome to Two Minute Jazz. When you see the 16th note written like a samba pattern, and you have just something that's so different, that when you have to play that rhythm. And the exercise that I created to make a real different 16th note with a little swing, it is something like that. You have to think, first, in the síncopa with the left hand. And two eighth notes with the right hand like that. And the other exercise, you think about three against two. Three with the left hand and two with the right hand. And now try playing two bars with the síncopa and two bars with the triplets against two. And now we have to take off the first note off my left hand of each tempo.I hope that's gonna help you to try to imitate that thing that people do in the school of samba. Just with your hi-hat. Okay, and that is something that you can find in my course from Open Studio. And you're gonna have more details there. And I hope you enjoyed, and see you next time.========================================================Website: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    Exploring Brazilian Rhythms - Edu Ribeiro | 2 Minute Jazz

    4:00

    Edu Ribeiro shows you how to combine different traditional Brazilian rhythms, including the samba and baião.For full length drum lessons with Edu Ribeiro, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/brazilian-jazz-drumming========================================================Hi, I'm Edu Ribeiro and welcome to Two Minute Jazz. You know what those rhythms that I just played now have in common? Every rhythm was the same sub-division, in 16 notes, and often this rhythm has the same time signature: 2/4. And all of these rhythms were Brazilian rhythms. And that's something that people maybe don't know. That if they are different rhythms, you could combine these rhythms. You could play this rhythm in the same song, and with some parts you play samba and a different part you play a baião, or in the same part of the music you play both.And talking about the 16 notes, if you play samba, that is the most common Brazilian rhythm. You have the pandero, the tambourine doing chika chika, that I'm going to imitate with my right hand or on the hi-hat or on the cymbal.If you have to play a baião, you have the triangle that goes: ticka ticka ticka. That I'm going to try and imitate with my hi-hat too.If you're going to play a maracatu, the snare drum does the 16 note all the time.And even if in the rhythm there is no percussion instrument playing out the 16 note, the subdivision of the clave will be in 16 notes, as in the afoxê from Bahia.That is one thing that we're gonna practice together here, the combination of this rhythm.Happy practicing.========================================================Website: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
  • 2 Minute Jazz podcast

    How to Play Patterns That Don't Sound Like Patterns - Peter Martin | 2 Minute Jazz

    3:43

    Patterns might be a dirty word in jazz, but Peter Martin shows you how to play them without making it obvious.========================================================What's going on everybody, Peter Martin here for 2 Minute Jazz. Wanna talk to you about patterns, which is a little bit of a dirty word for me, but there I said it. But I want to talk to you about how we can play patterns, without them sounding like patterns.Now, a pattern is anything that's repeated, it could be anything that you repeat and move around. So, how do we play them? Because actually patterns and art and music and nature are very important, and they form a great foundation for some of our great improvisations.So, I was kind of playing around on "Someday My Prince Will Come," and when I get this D flat diminished, a little bit of a problematic chord for many of you. So that's a place where sometimes we'll take a pattern, we'll take an easy phrase, and then repeat it.So we're just going up the diminished whole halves, I guess it is. In broken minor thirds. Over a little triplet thing. That's fine but it sounds a little corny. And then especially if we keep moving it into that C minor.So, there's some little things we can do though. So there I'm just I'm a little out of time, we'll pull it back into time, but I'm going up the scale, the diminished, but then I start going chromatic, and kinda change up the time also, so if I start out triplets, it makes it a little more organic, it makes it more like, you know, you'd sing it or something although you'd be a heck of a singer to be able to do that, but harmonically and melodically that chromaticism really kinda adds something I think nice.Other things you can do is to keep the same interval but then change direction, and doing it in a kind of random and organic way. And if you combine that with the chromatic, then it sounds like it's not a pattern, but it actually is.All right, have fun with that, happy practicing.========================================================For full length piano lessons with Peter Martin, check out https://www.openstudiojazz.com/pianoWebsite: https://www.openstudiojazz.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeyOpenStudioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyopenstudioTwitter: https://twitter.com/HeyOpenStudio See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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