Scaffold podcast

A rerun, and an update

0:00
39:30
Manda indietro di 15 secondi
Manda avanti di 15 secondi
A rerun, and an update by The Architecture Foundation

Altri episodi di "Scaffold"

  • Scaffold podcast

    56: Lee Ivett (Baxendale)

    1:00:46

    Lee Ivett is an architect, educator and founder of the participatory architecture, art and design studio Baxendale – a practice best known for developing low-budget socially-led projects within communities across the UK. “For me, just being in a place and registering it through your own human experience – your own emotional experience, your own physical experience - I started to understand that that was far more informative, and that your own instinct, reactions and discomforts were far more informative, and actually could be a mode of research - a more empathic, situated, lived mode of research - than some of the more normative modes of analysis and research that you’d find in an architecture school.”
  • Scaffold podcast

    55: Max Creasy

    50:06

    Max Creasy is an architectural photographer based in Berlin. “I’m more interested now in formulating my own [photographic] language, which is a mixture of still life photography, or the way you might work with portrait photography, or vernacular photography — asking what this might constitute as architectural photography. I’m interested in photographing the building, not rendering the building. I’m interested in letting the camera be a camera, and not trying to falsify how the camera sees it.”
  • Scaffold podcast

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  • Scaffold podcast

    54: Hélène Binet

    54:07

    Hélène Binet is an architectural photographer based in London "In a construction site you imagine what remains unfinished - you see the structure but you make up the rest. Similarly the ruin is more than what you perceive [...] In both cases, with the building site and the ruin, they are about you imagining, which is the most important thing you could want to do with an image, because in the end if you can’t imagine, I’m just giving you information, and that’s not what I want to do. I want you to enter, and imagine."
  • Scaffold podcast

    53: William Scott & Sarah Galender Meyer

    59:01

    William Scott is a self-taught artist based in Oakland, California. Scott works out of a gallery and studio called Creative Growth that advances the inclusion of artists with developmental disabilities. (Scott was born schizophrenic and is also on the autistic spectrum.) Scott Frequently describes himself as an architect, reinventing the social topography of a gentrified San Francisco, as a utopian city he calls ‘Praise Frisco’ in works that combine architectural design with civic responsibility to describe his desire for a more equitable society. The first significant survey of Scott’s 30–year practice was recently exhibited at Studio Voltaire - a London-based not–for–profit arts organisation. Notes: Michael Maltzan & David Ogunmuyiwa with Nana Biamah-Ofosu: The World and the City https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUuNhKqYni8&ab_channel=ArchitectureFoundation RESOLVE and PoOR Collective with Nana Biamah-Ofosu: The Cultural Meaning of the City https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4W7yQqedY&ab_channel=ArchitectureFoundation Tom DiMaria and Matthew Higgs on the Work of William Scott: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUuNhKqYni8&ab_channel=ArchitectureFoundation The Turner prize and the rise of neurodiverse art - The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/dec/23/turner-prize-rise-of-neurodiverse-art-project-herbert-coventry Roberta Smith and Holland Carter - Best Shows of 2021 https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/07/arts/design/best-art-2021.html
  • Scaffold podcast

    Rerun - 4: Pablo Bronstein (March 2018)

    54:11

    [This episode originally aired on 21 March 2018] Pablo Bronstein is an artist based in London. "I’m from a generation that lives entirely within irony - so that everything is a quotation, everything is double-sided, everything is good and bad […] In order to feel that you’re simultaneously lying and telling the truth, it’s because there is a ‘you’ there somehow - there is a core at the centre that is able to perceive the difference between truth and lie. The majority of young people today have a very different relationship to themselves, and I think it has something to do with how external their lives are now, and how there is less self-formation early on in life, so you are given more options to choose from but they are just a series of options pre-fabricated for you […] I’ve always said that people under the age of 25 don’t really have a sub-conscious. There’s nothing really there, or rather, there’s a lot there but it’s the same all the way through." Correction: In this interview it is suggested that Adam Nathaniel Furman had written a response to a 2017 Dezeen article by Sean Griffiths. In fact no such response has been published.
  • Scaffold podcast

    Rerun - 24: Mary Duggan (May 2019)

    55:55

    [This episode originally aired on 9 May 2019] Mary Duggan was a founding partner of Duggan Morris Architects, and established Mary Duggan Architects in 2017. “I think [architects] are obsessed with justification, but sometimes in architecture you can’t explain everything. Lots of architects, and I’m not one of them, find an amazing historic building and want to pull it apart to understand it, and want that understanding of it to inform their work, and I just don’t think you need that all the time. I think we’ve forgotten we’re intuitive - that you can go to a site and decide quite instantly what it should be.”
  • Scaffold podcast

    52: Job Floris

    1:15:38

    Job Floris is co-founder of Monadnock, an architecture practice based in Rotterdam. “A lot of ideas and buildings that we find intriguing were part of the discourse of postmedernity in the 1980s, and if you step away from the [lack of craftsmanship] of these buildings, then a lot of topics are very relevant and really require a new take. I have the feeling that since the 80s we have learned more about how we can make tangible and tactile buildings; making images, masks, symbols and assemblages would not necessarily deny the idea of craft and the construction of tangible and elegant architecture.”
  • Scaffold podcast

    51: Lisa Robertson (Part 2)

    58:34

    Lisa Robertson is a poet and art writer. “There are parts of consciousness that go unsaid, that have not yet found the language or the representational modes that can open them further, and I think that’s really the only thing that interest me as a writer […] I’m interested really in what’s ‘unpublishable’ – what happens before any person reaches a threshold of self-representation – and I feel that threshold is more and more the place I want to be. I want to be doing my work in that stinky inner chute of the cheap hotel where the concierges hang their rancid rags. That’s the space I want to be working in. I want to be working in the unspeakable space.”
  • Scaffold podcast

    50: Lisa Robertson (Part I)

    1:06:53

    Lisa Robertson is a poet and art writer. “[Vitruvius’s original notion of] “commodiousness” as a receptive potential in architecture — architecture that can receive the most of human experience — has been reduced to the notion of “commodity,” that which moves with the least tension and conflict. So I appropriated this term from Vitruvius in architectural discourse; how can I make this work more commodious? How can it receive more complexity? How can it have a denser, richer social existence?”
  • Scaffold podcast

    A rerun, and an update

    39:30

    A rerun, and an update by The Architecture Foundation

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