Web Masters podcast

Gary Kremen @ Match.com: The Elected Official Who Pioneered Online Dating

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Yes, you’ve heard of Match.com. And you’re probably vaguely aware that Match.com was the first dating website. You might even know that Match.com is part of Match Group, Inc., which is a publicly traded, NASDAQ-100 company that also owns dating sites like Tinder, OkCupid, Hinge, and PlentyOfFish. But the Match.com you know about isn’t particularly similar to the Match.com Gary Kremen founded in 1993.


In fact, the site that became Match.com was actually founded before the World Wide Web even existed. When Gary launched it, he wasn't focused on dating. Instead, Gary recognized that the Web was great for anyone interested in connecting with other people in order to exchange goods and services.


That led Gary to start a company called Electric Classifieds, Inc. It was a technology company that built online classifieds software to compete with the classified advertising sections in newspapers. Online dating was, of course, an obvious use case. But Gary took it much farther than most people realize.

For a complete transcript of the episode, click here.


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