The Healthy Rebellion Radio podcast

The Healthy Rebellion Radio

Robb Wolf

The Healthy Rebellion Radio is a weekly show featuring listener Q and A on all things diet and health. We dig into metabolic flexibility, body recomposition, resilient aging, circadian biology, gut health, low carb/keto/paleo diets and much more. Brought to you by New York Times bestselling author Robb Wolf and his wife Nicki Violetti (hubs and wife). Welcome to The Healthy Rebellion Radio.

100 episodios

  • The Healthy Rebellion Radio podcast

    Long-Term Blood Donation, Low Body Temperature, EMF Filters and Earthing | THRR092

    55:05

    Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Durability of immune responses to the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine "reports of waning vaccine efficacy, coupled with the emergence of variants of concern that are resistant to antibody neutralization, have raised concerns about the potential lack of durability of immunity to vaccination. We recently reported findings from a comprehensive analysis of innate and adaptive immune responses in 56 healthy volunteers who received two doses of the BNT162b2 vaccination. Here, we analyzed antibody responses to the homologous Wu strain as well as several variants of concern, including the emerging Mu (B.1.621) variant, and T cell responses in a subset of these volunteers at six months (day 210 post-primary vaccination) after the second dose. Our data demonstrate a substantial waning of antibody responses and T cell immunity to SARS-CoV-2 and its variants, at 6 months following the second immunization with the BNT162b2 vaccine. Notably, a significant proportion of vaccinees have neutralizing titers below the detection limit, and suggest a 3rd booster immunization might be warranted to enhance the antibody titers and T cell responses."   1. Low Body Temperature [18:16] John says: Hi, Im trying to figure out if a declining body temp is something I should be focused on. I’m 42 now and a couple years ago I started noticing my daytime temperature was not a consistent 98.6. No big deal I thought until more recently I started having a hell of a time waking up in the morning. After doing some reading on thyroid related issues (which run in my family) I started recording my daily temp. Most days my waking temp is 96.9 - 97.1. During the day it hovers around 97.6. I’ve done a full suite of thyroid tests multiple times and my Free T3/T4, TSH, Reverse T4, and thyroid antibodies are right where they should be so no obvious issues there. I generally follow a paleo diet but switched to strict keto for a few months this spring and now follow a low carb diet, no gluten. For activity I do have a 40 hr work week at a computer but my spare time involves part time farm work and 2x weekly capoeira classes. When I’m not at the work desk I’m fairly mobile. I’m male, 5’5” and fluctuate between 135-140 lbs. Daily calorie intake is usually around 1500 calories unless I’m burning hard with activity on a given day. Is this just par for the course as we age for some folks? Is my metabolism just slowing down? My energy and muscle mass is still excellent, but I am fascinated with this and wondering if it’s anything I should keep paying attention to. Thanks! 2. Long-Term Blood Donation [23:23] Sherry Says: I'm a 61 year old female and a long time listener. I've been donating blood every couple months for several years. My mother had hemochromatosis. I was checked but fortunately do not have it. I know that blood donation helps keep iron levels in check and I like that my body refreshes itself by making new blood. I am wondering though if there's a downside to long-term, ongoing blood donation. I don't want to deplete some limited resource in my bone marrow, or something else like that! Thank you. 3. Wading through Scientific studies [26:32] Paul says: Hi to you both ,question for Rob My question is about the way scientific papers are written and the most effective method you have of screening out junk. I am not a medical professional or scientist. I work in IT and management during which I have developed a skillset around identifying ballshit. Whilst looking through papers in pubmed I find the summaries/ abstracts often very unhelpful or misleading. Then the main body of the paper is often rambling and I frequently find myself skimming details in an attempt to find basic facts about the study which I feel should have been stated clearly at the beginning. Information such as; The purpose of the study; the conclusions (if any); the scientific soundness of those conclusions (eg what kind of test with how many participants, the test cell characteristics and the control cell). Some papers are much better than others. But coming from a business background I am used to information following the following format Title 1 pager (recommendations) Appendix(method ,results,data and caveats) In my experience in business overly obtuse pros often points to deliberate deception or sloppiness. What is your view on this? How do you best navigate scientific papers in your research ? Are there recommendations you have for me so I can be more effective at working through these papers.? Are there services that grade papers with metrics. For example a simple way of filtering those studies without sizeable test cells and control groups. Or do you have any sources you consider to be consistently bad eg specific universities or business etc that you would avoid ? A final question on this topic is In your view what percentage of scientific studies are actually junk? Kind regards Paul Ps Love the show i feel with you both on the mic its very warm an nice, like sitting in front of a fire chatting about health. 4. Sea salt vs Electrolyte [45:30] Matt says: Hey Robb and Nicki. I’ve been listening to your podcast for a few years now and have definitely enjoyed the new format. Recently I read Sacred Cow, it was by far my favourite book of 2020. I have the paleo solution and wired to eat on my list of books to read at some point this year. To my question. For about a year now in the mornings my wife and I will each put a slice of lemon and 3 big pinches of Celtic sea salt into a big glass of water. Where we really noticed a difference was in the summer heat, when we would sweat. My question is, how is this different then consuming “electrolytes”? Are there any differences that we would notice by taking electrolytes instead of just a good sea salt? I would love to try LMNT one day, but being from Canada doesn’t make it as simple. Thank so much for your content. Matt. 5. What's the deal with EMF Filters and Earthing [48:00] Derek says: Hey guys, Love the show. Now straight to my questions. I don't think you have covered this yet, at least not in great detail: 1. What are your thoughts on Earthing? Is this legit? It seems kind of ridiculous and tree-huggerish, but at the same time it has a ring of legitimacy. I've seen different methods recommended - from using grounding mats that you sleep or sit on to just walking around outside barefoot or sleeping on the ground. 2. What about EMF Filters? Again they have some ring of legitimacy, but at the same time seem kooky. Obviously there are waves galore travelling through the air, but is blocking out these waves (if the filters even work) really going to make that much difference? What about just removing electronics from the room. Does that really make that much of a difference? I plan on trying out some of these methods, from the standard remove all electronics from the room, to actually shutting off the breaker for our bedroom, but given that there are so many other factors that could affect how I perceive my sleep quality I thought I would see what you guys think. Without solid research or, at a minimum, convincing anecdotes I am definitely not going to be dropping a few hundred dollars on something like this, but I would really like to know if it actually works. Thanks for all the awesomeness. Keep it up! https://robbwolf.com/2020/04/08/5g-and-coronavirus-salty-talk-004-thrr/ Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at the blog page for this episode: https://robbwolf.com/2021/10/22/wading-through-scientific-studies-low-body-temperature-emf-filters-and-earthing-thrr092/
  • The Healthy Rebellion Radio podcast

    Is Ground Meat Processed Food, Nicotine Adverse Effects, Lifting With Slipped Disk | THRR091

    50:11

    Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/12/health/aspirin-heart-attack-stroke.html 1. Peptide uptake orally [12:50] Andreas says: Dear both. First of all thank you both for all that you do. I am very grateful for you weekly courage, «sticking your neck out there», sharing your take on life while crushing main stream «dogma”. Love it, great job – please keep it up. Now, could you please help me understand how all the so called beneficial peptides in animal foods ends up in the human body to deliver any biological function? The human digestion system is very good at breaking down peptide sequences long before they reach their  destination to give any biological function (both spontaneously, non-enzymatically, like stomach acid, and enzymatically by peptidase etc.). Now days, I am experimenting using my chicken eggs as a “delivery vessel” by which I deliver non palatable but highly nutrient dense organ foods to my family indirectly by actively changing the egg nutrient profile(or so I think). The chickens free range and get plenty of sunshine in the summer, eat bugs, greens, wild herbs and berries, while I occasionally feed them organ meats(primarily beef liver and heart), beef tallow etc. They get no plant oils, soy and so on. They love the organ meat and look/act very healthy. I know the fatty acid profile of the eggs will change to a higher percent of for example steric acid (based on research literature), but not sure about the other vitamins, minerals and peptides from their diet actually ends up in the eggs – and so is passed on to my wife and kids. I have no problems eating meats like liver and heart, but they will not touch it, let alone eat it. But they absolutely LOVE my dishes that I preparer from those eggs (like carnivore waffles etc.). But if humans (or chickens) do not absorb many of these nutrients, peptides in a biological active form and increase the nutritional profile of the eggs, well, then the story ends there. A little bit like some expensive skin care products that my wife uses, that proclaim the price I justified with added water soluble vitamins that should be so healthy, but will not ba absorbed unless you eat the damn thing.. Best, Andreas 2. Non-carb processed food, issues? [18:10] Mike says: Hi, can’t explain how important you guys have been in my life over the past 12ish years. I’ve listened to EVERYTHING and implemented SOME (realistically a lot, although I don’t really have any health / nutrition / digestive issues so it’s more of a favorite-subject/interest of mine than a dire need to make sweeping changes sort of thing). Question: I know ‘processed’ foods are worse for us for a number of reasons and that there are different levels of processing (highly processed factory food, steak vs ground meat, blending mainly unprocessed foods to make a smoothie, etc) but my question is, are these processed foods ever better for us than the unprocessed? …or maybe equivalent, mainly when it comes to processed fat/protein. I’ve wondered for a while, if a quality liverwurst, from USwellness for example, might be an ideal food, despite the baggage it carries along with it ‘processed meat’. THE DEVIL! But let’s be realistic here. My understanding of this product is that it’s a nose to tail tube of goodness, from a healthy animal, all slapped together, with some spices. All good right? Is there any benefit or detriment to this sort of thing? Does the protein/fat being digested more quickly than if I chewed the component parts individually, really matter?? I know processed sugar becomes a blood sugar issue, but does processed fat/protein have a similar corollary?? Thanks! Side note, I know you always say chew your food and I think this mostly refers to people who have weight control issues and need the chewing/eating/fullness slowdown to moderate their intake. Clearly this is probably one way to answer the above question but is there anything else?? PS: I’ve often thought of getting a tattoo of the fraction 1/6 somewhere, to signify I was one of six listeners, with the added benefit that nobody else would know why the hell I had it!! Thanks… hopefully this shoots to the healthy rebellion e-mail… couldn’t figure out how to ask a question to the new poddy. I joined the rebellion for a month last year and it’s great and all but I just realllllllly don’t like social media. (It’s not you it’s me ) 3. Lifting With a Slipped Disk [29:06] Trystan says: Robb and Nicki, Love the podcast! I'll make this short - my wife has had an operation on her back due to a slipped disk, but she's curious to start lifting. What do you guys think? I'm no expert, however it does seem a bit risky. That being said she knows her body and what her back can take more than anyone... Would love to hear your advice on whether lifting with slipped disks could be beneficial or downright dangerous. All the best, and keep up the good work. 4. Cluster Dextrin [40:43] Jackson says: I would love to hear your opinion on this! Thanks 5. Nicotine Adverse Effects? [42:45] Garrett says: Hi Robb & Nikki, 'Been around since the Paleo Solution podcast days, so while I'm not an OG-6 listener, OG-20 is not out of the question. I heard a Q&A episode a while back where a listener asked about the caffeine-nicotine protocol you suggested for special forces, or anyone working odd hours / graveyard shifts to stay moderately alert while still being able to unwind at the end of the day. In a similar vein, on a recent Huberman Lab episode he mentioned the potential benefits of Nicotine in treating Alzheimer's disease. I believe it is universally agreed upon Nicotine is a nootropic / cognitive enhancer. Now to my question - I'm Swedish, and we have quite the 'snus-culture' over there, our spin of dry snuff (tobacco pouches, but without the spitting you see with American dip). I've gravitated towards this as an alternative to drinking, and I should note I've moved to the tobacco free versions containing only nicotine (Zyn is a brand that is making it's ways in the U.S.). However, one can't really drink on the job, whereas the only bad time for some snus is while eating and sleeping, leaving about 16 hours of consumption throughout the day. Is there to your knowledge a 'healthy' range to stay within? In the U.S. they are sold in 3 and 6mg pouches, however the 'good stuff' I can get in Sweden goes all the way up to 20mg. According to a quick Google search, only 10-20% of the content is actually absorbed, meaning the dose "per hit" is up to 4mg. I could be on the high end consuming shy of 50mg per day some days. I've gladly taken in your and Andrew's notes as a compelling argument that I'm functioning better cognitively while staving off Alzheimer's disease, but I have a good feeling there's another side of this story I should heavily consider as for all I know I'm doing damage equivalent to smoking a pack a day, just wrapped in different packaging with different side effects. Appreciate all you do to keep us informed and entertained. -Garrett Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript at the blog page for this episode https://robbwolf.com/2021/10/15/is-ground-meat-processed-food-nicotine-adverse-effects-lifting-with-slipped-disk-thrr091/
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    Fitness Targets After 50, Butyrate for Gut Health, Protein and Cholesterol | THRR090

    43:29

    Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://mises.org/wire/how-fiat-money-made-beef-more-expensive L-Arginine: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/eclinm/article/PIIS2589-5370(21)00405-3/fulltext https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/blog/2021/10/01/the-one-amino-acid-that-cured-covid 1. Calculating How Much Protein For My Bodyweight [19:52] Gloria says: On your last show you talked about having 1 gram of protein for every pound of body weight. Other people say 1 gram for every kg of body weight. Which is it in your opinion? Thanks so much! Keep up the good work. I look forward to your show every week. 2. High Cholesterol and eating more protein [20:56] Kimberly says: Hi Love your show.  I have been listening since the beginning.  Please never stop recording.  In the last couple years (since covid hit)  I have lost 20 lbs.  I have a muscular body type, I am 54 years young , 5'4", weigh 137lbs (post menopausal) workout 5 days a week with crossfit, 1 day Yoga, and walk the dog 2 miles a day.  I attribute the weight loss with eating more protein.  I now eat almost 120 gms a day where before I probably only got 50-70 if that (did not track) . My protein sources are usually chicken , smoked salmon, tuna, turkey, once a week red meat.  I do add pure protein bars (20gms) towards the end of the day when protein levels aren't there yet. I went to the doctor and got bloodwork done and my cholesterol went up. It went from the total 226 to -244, LDL-101 to 131, to HDL-105 to 101, ratio-2.1 to 2.4, Triglycerides-61 to 62 from Sept of 2020 to Sept 2021.  ugh I know I should probably ignore it because my ratio seems great and I feel great.  For some reason its bugging the crap out of me, how can I lose weight and eat more protein and have the numbers go up?  Should I be concerned?  Thanks you both rock. 3. Butyrate and Tributyrin for Gut Health [25:37] Ruby says: Hi Robb!  Long time listener here (yeah! #throwback to Greg days) and current LMNT lover. I came across a supplement that uses a combination of Tributyrin and Vitamin D, and supposedly promotes a healthy gut, aids in healing leaky gut, helps reduce bloating, improves digestion and vitamin absorption, boots immune system etc. etc. etc.  What they say is that Tributyrin has been used in Spain for at least 3 years but is just starting to come to the US.  There are some studies on mice but not a ton in humans yet. I'm just wondering if you've done research on Butyrate/Tributyrin and whether or not you'd suggest experimenting with something like this.  I am mostly paleo for about a decade, but my belly pooches out a ton (granted, I've had 2 kids and I'm working on core function), I haven't had consistent bowel movements in months, and while my stress levels are somewhat high because I'm an entrepreneur, I get 7 hours of sleep a night and do my best to keep myself regulated.  I've tried probiotics, drink kombucha, try to get resistant starches (hate fermented foods unfortunately) and am pretty well versed in diet/health (thanks in large part to you!).  I'm interested in trying out this supplement but very wary of putting anything in my body that is unknown and I can't find much info from people I trust (like you) on this particular topic. So I guess my question is twofold - what do you know about Butyrate/Tributyrin and also, how to decide what is safe to experiment with? Thanks so much for dealing with all the BS out there to provide information to all of us. Tributyrin, a Stable and Rapidly Absorbed Prodrug of Butyric Acid, Enhances Antiproliferative Effects of Dihydroxycholecalciferol in Human Colon Cancer Cells 4. Strength/aerobic/flexibility targets after age 50 [33:26] Jen says: Hello Robb and Nicki, I’m currently working as a health coach in a small clinical study to reverse cognitive impairment with “integrative therapy and lifestyle rehabilitation”. Can you point us to any reliable strength, aerobic, and flexibility benchmarks for men and women over 50?  Ideally, the fitness assessment could be done at home without special equipment. It could be useful for participants to develop greater awareness of their relative fitness.  Some seniors feel great about their occasional walks in comparison to their physically-deteriorated, sedentary peers.  But, outside of my health coaching sessions, the doctor will plainly state that just “walking isn’t cutting it.” For brain health, it could me most therapeutic for them to engage in complex, cognitively challenging physical activities, such as dance, martial arts, or sports (at an appropriate level), and check to see what supplemental exercise is needed to meet cardio, muscular, and flexibility targets. The fitness assessments I found from the Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/fitness/art-20046433 seem questionable in that both men and women at age 65 have the exact same target of 10 classic pushups.  Does the upper body strength differential between the two sexes really disappear by age 65?  I couldn’t find an especially good resource for ages 50-90.  For instance, the Fullerton Functional test/Senior Fitness test has arm curls as the best assessment of upper body strength.  The presidents challenge at health.gov has assessments for students but not elders. If people want to be physically functional and free from chronic illness at a ripe old age, shouldn't they have be able to look for what needs attention at age 55, 60, 65, etc?  I’d so appreciate your thoughts! With tons of respect and admiration!! https://moveskill.com/athletic-skill-levels/ 5. Itching after Jiu Jitsu Class [39:47] Ryan says: Hi Robb and Nicki, Big fan of your work! I’ve been training jiu jitsu (nogi) for about 6 years and absolutely love it… except for the fact that every morning after training I experience uncontrollable itching on my body, predominately my legs, but sometimes all over. I generally train in the evening, so the onset is about 10-12 hours after my session. This has been frustrating to say the least. I’ve read that this can be a problem for exercisers due to sweat… but that sounds iffy to me, plus I never had an issue with other forms of exercise, just jits. I’ve tried probiotics and different soap/laundry detergent to no avail. The only thing that semi helps is to shower immediately after the itching begins or sweat it out. Usually subsides after about 30-60 minutes… Any thoughts? Oss! Ryan Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: https://robbwolf.com/2021/10/08/fitness-targets-after-50-butyrate-for-gut-health-protein-and-cholesterol-thrr090/
  • The Healthy Rebellion Radio podcast

    Testosterone Boosting, Non-Marine Omega-3, Grass-Fed Meat Importance | THRR089

    52:05

    Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://grabbyaliens.com/ 1. Non-marine Omega 3 Sources [14:25] Robert says: Hi Rob and Nicki. I am unable to supplement with fish oil because it severely increases my anxiety and will eventually lead to terrible episodes of panic and OCD. It took me a while to figure out it was the fish oil because you typically only hear about how beneficial it is and all of the positives from supplementation. Because of this I’m worried about getting enough DHA and EPA. I do eat fish about once a week/week and a half. I don’t seem to have the same problem when eating fish but I’m sure I’m not eating it enough to replicate the same problem from supplementing fish oil and I also worry about eating high amounts of fish due to contaminants. I’ve also heard that getting omega 3 from plant sources like flaxseed is insufficient. How can I make sure I’m getting enough DHA and EPA? I’m 33 years old, have been eating low carb for 5 years, lift 4 days a week, I’m very active and fit and a healthy weight. Also any idea why fish oil does this to me? Acetylcholine? 2. How Much (or little) Protein? [18:29] Hilary says: I'm so confused about protein. Many very smart scientist wellness leaders say use it as a condiment and low protein intake = longevity. Others believe in leading with abundant animal protein to create strength and muscle which will = longevity. I'm a fit 63 yr old woman and confused about what science to follow. Thank you! 3. SARMs, peptides, & testosterone boosting herbs [25:52] Jamie says: Ay up Robb and Nicki, Ages ago, I sent you a question about ketogenic diets and TBI which you were gracious enough to answer on THR038. I have upped my salt intake as per your answer to that question and it has helped. In the proceeding time I have been doing more research on TBI and I came across the world leader in its treatment, Dr. Mark Gordon. His protocol centres around dampening down the neuroinflammation in the brain and restoring any hormonal imbalances that occur after a TBI. Although I am not 100%, I am definitely better and I just feel that it’s just one or two adjustments that I need to make with the biggest thing, perhaps the only thing holding me back, sleep, or lack of it I should say. I follow Dr. Mark Gordon’s recommendation of 100mg of pregnenolone before bed and whilst he reports in his clinical practice that for most people this tidies up their sleep, it hasn’t done that for me. Dr Gordon says when this happens he usually prescribes a small dose of progesterone, 5mg, and this usually does the trick. Instead of doing that I wish to try something else as I have come across the world of peptides, some of which I have experimented with. I’ve tried CJC 1290 with DAC and ipamorelin for growth hormone release as well as BPC-157 for tissue and bone repair for some long-term issues I have had with my joints which has actually helped me a little bit. The CJC1290 and ipamorelin didn’t really do much for my sleep but I have found deep sleep-inducing peptide (DSIP) which I have bought but not yet tried. I have also come across SARM’s, (selective androgen reuptake modulators) which I haven’t tried. They come with some pretty stunning claims to be made on both their benefits and lack of side effects. What is your take on peptides and SARM’s? Would their long-term use turn off someone’s own endogenous production in the same way that exogenous testosterone does? Instead of SARM’s, which I am sceptical of being able to do the job of replenishing the role of testosterone in my brain, I am instead doing clomid, 50mg every third day, and also Dan Huberman’s recommendation of using the herbs Fadogia Agrestis and Tongkat Ali to help boost testosterone. Would it be worth cycling these herbs, especially Fadogia, as from my understanding it mimics luteinising hormone? Could this then shut off my own endogenous production of luteinising hormone? Just one final note to make, it’s amazing what you can find and then buy on the Internet, especially when using Bitcoin!? Thank you Jamie 4. Muscle Cramping and Salt [35:55] Ben says: Hey Robb and Nicki, Great podcast, I really enjoy and appreciate all you do. I have a question regarding muscle cramping. It is something I have dealt with for essentially my whole life. My father has had problems with hamstring, calf and hand cramping through his life as well. Personally, after harder workouts I notice my hamstrings have a very low threshold to cramp, as well as hands and abs. At night, my gastrocs and peroneals cramp as well. Since starting LMNT and supplementing my own salt to it (~ 6-8g total salt/day) my hamstring, ab, and hand cramps have greatly been improved though my calf cramps still seem to be present. The night time calf cramps fluctuate from 1-2 to 9-10 times/ night requiring I jump out of bed to dorsiflex my foot against the ground to get it to stop. I have tried some "leg cramp" pills from Sprouts which seem to help some but not completely. Sorry for rambling but lastly I have had my DNA run and it states I "wasted salt" and should add more salt to my diet. I am wondering if you think I just need to supplement more salt? (Though at times I feel I put too much in and disaster pants is a real thing) or if there may be something bigger that I should see a functional practitioner for? Any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thank you (For reference, Im a 31 year old male, crossfit 5-6 times/ week and am standing in the OR 3-5 times/ week. 6'4"; 225 lbs. Eat paleo) 5. Importance of Grass fed meat [40:02] Paul says: Hi guys I have a question about grass fed meat and the evidence for its importance for it to be grass fed. Eating meat from healthy well fed, free animals intuitively sounds like a good idea for your health. It also fits with the overall philosophy of paleo eating which I use as my guide through these things. However Living in Norway sometimes means that is not possible and I have to get my meat from the supermarket. It  got me wondering about what scientific evidence there is to support the hypothesis that grass fed /organic meat etc is actually better for your health. So my question is what evidence , if any , have found of this in the literature. If there is evidence are there some animals that are better than others to get from supermarket.I notice myself if eat half a rotisserie chicken from the supermarket i can feel pretty rough after that but half a kilo mince I'm just fine- same with any fish. Regards Paul Share the episode! If something in this show helped you please share the episode with your friends! Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: Download transcript here (PDF)
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    Child Constipation, Fasting and Fast Twitch Muscle, Best Animal Bone Broth | THRR088

    31:58

    Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: The carbohydrate-insulin model: a physiological perspective on the obesity pandemic 1. Child Constipation [9:36] Katie says: Hi Robb and Nikki! As always, thank you for all you do. My 7 year old daughter started complaining of stomach pain a few months ago. She’s always been a good eater and has been gluten free since age 3 (not celiac, but noticed many health benefits for the whole family from cutting it out), eats minimal amounts of processed garbage and her diet is full of high quality protein, healthy fats and real, whole food. Her stomach pain increased in both severity and frequency over the summer. We cut back on dairy, with moderate success. We had blood tests done—all normal with no apparent food sensitivities or any other blood marker abnormalities. Finally her doctor did imaging that showed significant constipation. I have tended towards constipation my whole life, and my mom has IBS-C, so there’s definitely some familial tendencies. Her pediatrician suggested miralax to get things going, which we have been doing for the past several days, and she’s certainly pooping now, but still has daily tummy aches. Her pediatrician said daily miralax wouldn’t become habit forming and was perfectly safe for long term use, but this obviously doesn’t seem like the ideal answer. Do you have any suggestions on what I should try to bring her some relief, both in the short term but also for her digestive system as a whole? Why would a 7 year old who eats a healthy diet develop such severe constipation? How concerned should I be about using something like Miralax and are there better alternatives for keeping things moving? All my best, Katie 2. Anaerobic Ketolysis? [14:57] Howdy, Wolfs! Question... From what I understand, the body can only metabolize fatty acids aerobically, but it can metabolize glucose both aerobically and anaerobically. What about ketone bodies? Can the body anaerobically metabolize ketone bodies? I've scoured the internet periodically for probably a couple of years looking for a definitive answer to this nagging question, but I always come up empty handed. I have no functional reason to ask this question - I'm just a nerdy personal trainer with a penchant for delving deep and an evolutionary biology/ancestral health bent. 3. Fasting and Fast Twitch Muscle [16:37] Bonni says: From https://body.io/intermittent-fasting-part-3-go-eat-yourself/ "macroautophagy is transient in nearly all tissues except fast twitch muscle[7, 11] ..... Prolonged fasting triggers autophagy to deteriorate muscle tissue faster than severing the nerve to the muscle[29, 30]. .....  The only thing IF does for autophagy is to drive it into destructive ranges for fast-twitch muscle." This is from an old post and the references don't work anymore - do you have any info to back up or refute the fasting /fast-twitch muscle claim? Would eating fat prohibit the muscle catabolism or would protein be needed?  thanks! 4. Finasteride for baldness? [22:43] Steven says: Hi Robb and Nikki, I recently visited the doctor for a checkup and she noticed that my hair is starting to thin up top. Sad day :( She recommended that I get on a medication called Finasteride, and said that if I start taking it now I can likely preserve my luscious locks. I did some digging online, and the testimonials I have found regarding side effects scare the bejesus out of me. Do you have any thoughts on this medication? And do you have any recommendations on the diet/lifestyle side of things to help keep my hair? For context, I am a 32-year-old male athlete (rock climber), and in excellent health. I follow a mostly paleo diet, with a few exceptions here and there. I eat plenty of protein (1 g per lb bodyweight) mostly from grass-fed beef, about 200-300 g of carbs per day to fuel my training and climbing, and plan to start taking more collagen supplements to support tendons, skin, and hopefully hair. Any thoughts are welcome! I love the podcast, and what you have done with the Healthy Rebellion. Thank you for all that you do. 5. Which animal is best, re: bone broth [28:59] Sarah says: Hey team! LOVE the podcast and all of the work that you do. I recently moved abroad and suddenly have access to many high-quality, inexpensive animal bones. I’ve been making beef bone broth in the instant pot (GAME CHANGER) and it’s delish! I usually break my fasts with a cup, and I’ve saved the fat for cooking. I accidentally bought lamb bones once, and turns out they made amazing bone broth too. So now I wonder- is bone broth ACTUALLY THAT good for me? Which animal is best? Beef, lamb, chicken, camel (no joke!)? Any suggestions on finding literature on animal nutrient contents?       Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes
  • The Healthy Rebellion Radio podcast

    Immunodeficiency, BPPV Vertigo, Alzheimer's | THRR087

    44:34

    Immunodeficiency, Is Alzheimer's Preventable, Ice Hockey / Sleep, BPPV, Imodium Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Too Good To Check: A Play In Three Acts 1. Immunodeficiency [20:52] Mary says: Hi Robb and Nicki! I love your podcast and have been listening on and off for a few years.  You are the only health based podcast that I still listen to since everyone has gone crazy this past year and I highly value all the work that you are both doing! So.... my husband has described me as the most sickly health fanatic that he has ever met.  I catch every cold, have frequent sinus, bronchitis, yeast infections, strep, skin rashes, stomach flus, bouts of fatigue and dizziness.  I have tried every diet out there to feel better.  I have your books Wired to Eat and The Paleo Solution, so I am familiar with carb testing and using a glucose meter. If I am active, running (10k plus or hard intervals etc) and lifting weights, I know that fast acting carbs like sugar are needed or my recovery will suffer.  For days.  I use a manual glucose monitor to track this.  Intermitent fasting and keto are both a no go for me as I will have disrupted sleep, poor performance and fasting blood sugar levels under 4mmol/L, and with keto my ldl levels go up. I know everyone is so sick of hearing about covid but it plays into my question.  I had been low carb for years, and in the most recent year eating closer to carnivore with fruit and local raw honey.  I have also had chronic low ferritin for years, even eating steak fried in a cast iron pan once or twice a day and avoiding grains and dairy.  I am a personal trainer and runner and was very fit.  I got covid October 30 to be exact.  It knocked my socks off and I have never been the same.  Energy crashes, days of extreme fatigue and dizzy spells, limited running performance. I have not worked full time since.  I was referred to a post covid pulminary clinic and I am showing slight blockage in my lungs.  They were testing for autoimmune and I surprised them with underimmune, low immunoglobulin IgG. We have recently been in contact with previously unknown family and found out that my 1/2 aunt has primary immunodeficiency.  I am on the wait list to see an immunologist but it could be months before I get seen.  I am at a loss at what to do now.  I have given up on paleo etc mostly out of dispair that anything is going to help.  What was working diet wise (the near carnivore) prior to having covid no longer works.  I did the DNA fit after listening to that episode of your podcast and it has come back recomending moderate carb and protien, no celiac etc.  Besides my Low IgG and ferritin all my bloodwork is great. Not sure where to go from here, what questions I should be asking Drs, should I redo the carb testing as my body seems to have changed?  Should I join your group for the upcoming reset? Sorry that this has been so long and rambling!  I would greatly appreciate any insight that you may have. Thank you, Mary 2. Is Alzheimer's preventable? [29:18] Edrie says: Hi Robb and Nicki, hope you guys are doing well. Thanks for all that you do, your podcast is something I look forward to every week. I have a subject I'd love your insight on: Alzheimer's Disease, specifically the prevention of it. My dad was diagnosed about 5-6 years ago (at age 64ish) and we just had to move him to a memory care facility because he needs 24 hour a day care. It's heartbreaking and terrifying to watch a loved one slip away and now to see all the advanced stage residents, a glimpse of what's to come. It's too late to delay or improve my dad's disease, but I am very interested in not spending my senior years living that way. Aside from maintaining a healthy diet, exercise, sleep, and managing stress (which are all things I prioritize), is there anything folks can do to prevent Alzheimer's? Are there any studies or research that you know of that you could point me toward? Thank you again, Edrie https://www.wndu.com/content/news/The-good-side-of-nicotine-for-Alzheimers-patients-567810531.html#:~:text=%22And%20nicotine%20can%20help%20imitate,improvements%20in%20attention%20and%20memory. The End of Alzheimer's Program 3. Ice hockey / sleep [31:47] Jator says: I have hockey practice typically 20:45-22:00 3 days a week. This is a requirement and I sleep (obviously) terrible on those nights, also shows objectively on my Oura ring. Not in a place ready to give up hockey BUT would love your thoughts on how to mitigate the stress response as much as possible to catch a decent night of sleep. Thank you for considering Huberman Lab - Science of Muscle Growth, Increasing Strength & Muscular Recovery 4. BPPV [37:22] Carla says: I have recurring BPPV. I am wondering if you have any suggestions in terms of diet and exercise that will help with this condition? I have asked my doctor and she says I just have to live with it. I have done the Epley maneuver several times which gives me temporary relief but nothing lasting. I am a 51 yo female and about 30 lbs overweight. Any insight you could provide would be welcome. Thank you for all you do!! Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo 5. Imodium [39:56] Tom says: I’ve heard you talk about low dose Imodium to help with loose stools.  I take 1/2 of a pill each morning, which is 1/4 of a dose.  Are there any long term side effects to this.  Have recently switched to carnivore due to unresolved issues with Keto.  Did the keto masterclass last year and saw great improvements, thanks for that and the content you put out on the regular.  Tom-Full Time RVer. Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: Download a copy of this transcript here (PDF)
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    Methane Mitigation, Kids Trying New Foods, Covid Food Aversions | THRR086

    40:21

    Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: Energy compensation and adiposity in humans 1. High Ferritin Levels and Resistance Training [11:44] Keith says: So I am a 48 YO male. 5-11 200 15-16 bf I follow a higher red meat diet 180-200g of protien and 80-100 g of fat a then 80-100g unprocessed carbs. I had some blood work done and my ferritin came back 803. Which is concerning My iron was 98 TIBC 286 and transferrin saturation is 34. Hemoglobin 12.9 and hematocrit is 38.4. My PA thinks I have anemia. I have no symptoms of fatigue but she is referring me to a hematologist. Would heavy resistance training have any affect on ferritin levels? searching the innerwebs I saw a few mentions of inflammation from heavy resistance training causing elevated levels and one should take 48-72 off from heavy training before blood tests. Any thoughts on resting then retesting my ferritin? 2. Electrolytes Before or After Workout? [14:15] David says: Dear Robb, I'm writing from hot, humid Singapore.  I'm 54 years old and work out in the cooler early mornings before work.  60-75 min workouts of running, sprinting and/or bodyweight workouts. I'm a big fan of LMNT Citrus Salt and find that I perform and recover better using it.  My normal routine is to drink one stick immediately upon waking, then get after it. I always end my workouts drenched in sweat.  Is it better to wait until after my workout to replace my lost electrolytes?  I would consume one before/one after - except that importing LMNT into Singapore is expensive! I appreciate any insight, Robb.  I love your work, dude. Sincerely, David LMNT Homebrew Guide https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0052/6434/3074/files/9_Simple_Electrolyte_Homebrew_Recipes_-_Elemental_Labs.pdf 3. Post Covid Hair Loss & Food Aversions [16:46] Shannon says: Hello Rob & Nikki! I had covid at the beginning of April 2021. I had a very easy time with it, likely thanks to 10 years of being careful about my diet & taking a preventative approach to my health (thanks to info from you guys & many others in the paleo/keto space). I had a slight fever on & off for about 10 days, a migraine (which isn’t uncommon for me), & fatigue. My appetite was suppressed for many days & when it came back I wasn’t craving the foods I should be eating. In fact, my favorite foods which are steaks & beef, still aren’t as appealing as they used to be. Meat in general, I am not craving but I do make myself eat it. I take quality supplements, that contain zinc. Do you have another suggestions for how to repair my taste buds? I also have started to lose some hair. Apparently this is common 3-4 months after covid. I am praying it stops soon. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Your work has definitely helped me get through the “pandemic” & I rock my HRR t shirt on many of my walks! Thanks for all you do! -Shannon 4. How To Get Young Kids To Try New Foods [23:58] Scott says: Robb, I've been following you for years, since about 2009. The amount of knowledge you have is impressive and I never get tired of listening to you, although i do miss the good ole days with Greg Everett. I never adopted the paleo diet because I have never had any health issues but I am now looking for some advice. My 4 year son is showing asthma like symptoms and I think it is due to his diet. We have tried to get him to eat healthier but he always gags when he tries something new. Do you have any book suggestions or advice for me to help my son eat new foods?  I understand you're a busy guy so I don't expect a response. I just had to ask you because I really value your opinion/experience. Thanks for all you do. Scott 5. Methane Mitigation [30:17] Nicholas says: Dear Robb Wolf, I recently read Sacred Cow and found it absolutely brilliant. I am trying to deepen my understanding of regenerative agricultural practises with a view to one day starting my own farm. I have a question regarding cattle feed additives for methane mitigation. On a recent MeatRx podcast, Shawn Baker asked Dr. Frank Mitloehner about his work on feed additives and whether they are required in regenerative systems. Dr. Mitloehner says “grazing animals are currently the greatest challenge with respect to enteric methane because they are not as accessible. […] Some thoughts are to include some active ingredients into the salt lick or into the water that the animals drink. Vaccination is another possibility.” Here is a link to his full answer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K31OZHUtvEg&t=2880s Do you agree with Dr. Mitloehner that these kinds of additives are necessary? I was under the impression (from your work and his) that enteric methane was not something to worry about when animals are well managed in concert with the surround ecosystem. I would be very interested to hear your thoughts on the issue. Thank you so much in advance for your time! Kind regards, Nicholas Harley P.S. Sacred Cow has changed my life and the lives of many of my friends and family. Thank you! Share the episode! If something in this show helped you please share the episode with your friends! Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: You can find the transcript on the blog post for this episode at https://robbwolf.com/2021/09/03/methane-mitigation-kids-trying-new-foods-covid-food-aversions-thrr086/
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    High Fat Food Study, Electrolytes For Long Flights, Dropping Sugar Increased Cholesterol | THRR085

    42:00

    Can I Ignore This Study, Thoughts and Feedback on IF, LMHR, High Blood Pressure From Salt Consumption, Electrolytes and Long Haul Flights Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: leaky vaccines, super-spreads, and variant acceleration 1. Can I ignore this study? [19:10] Kat says: Hi Robb and Nicki, Your podcast is still one of my favourite podcasts :) I did post my question on the Healthy Rebellion and had some helpful thoughts from other members but I wondered if it might be an interesting one to discuss on the podcast: Context: I eat a reasonably high fat meat based diet due to Sjogrens Syndrome having majorly affected my gut. Before I figured out what I could tolerate I lost a lot of weight and was actually warned my heart was under strain and beating too slowly, and I could die if I caught the normal flu. Now I have the weight back on and my heart is back to normal. So when I read things like this I sort of worry, and then talk myself out of worrying after remembering that mouse models aren't always translatable and so many studies have limitations in other ways. Any way, here's a discussion of the study. I haven't been able to get access to the full journal article. https://medicalgroup.ucdavis.edu/health-news/newsroom/study-explains-why-food-high-in-saturated-fat-may-lead-to-plaque-build-up-in-arteries/2021/08 Thanks :) 2. Thoughts and Feedback on IF [21:58] John says: I'm a long time listener and just wanted to give some feed back and thoughts on my own experiences. Recently you mentioned the mistakes many are making with doing intermittent fasting or one meal a day with muscle loss etc. I can say from my own experiences as a 49 year old man I tried it and it was magical at first but then I did lose muscle and strength and have gone back to a lower carb paleo/ancestral diet and feel much better. Strength, muscle tone, energy, libido, etc.. I think maybe the intermittent fasting thing has become or taken over from the CR or calorie restriction group with many or all of the usual side effects. Obviously fasting and intermittent fasting are great tools especially if some one is over weight or diabetic but we can look at fasting in religions and see that there are probably reasons its only certain times of the year. I don't know just wanted to hear your thoughts and say you as usual were right on. A recent Harvard study show exercise and not fasting is probably the key to health and longevity. Who would have thought that eating real food and moving was healthy? https://highintensityhealth.com/exercise-better-than-fasting-calorie-restriction-for-aging-longevity/ https://highintensityhealth.libsyn.com/exercise-is-better-than-fasting-calorie-restriction-for-aging-longevity-harvard-scientists-say 3. LMHR [26:52] Patrick says: I'm a 42 year old male personal trainer in Texas. I'm 5'8", about 170 pounds and stay at around 5-8% body fat. I've been in pretty much the same shape for about a decade. About 3 years ago I learned about Dave Feldman's work after being denied life insurance for having high cholesterol. Initially I was worried since my total cholesterol had always been around 200, LDL 130 and HDL 80 with low triglycerides. But suddenly my total cholesterol had jumped to 380, LDL to 280 and HDL to 98 still with low triglycerides around 70. The only change to my diet had been to completely cut out all processed sugar and other processed carbs. Up to that point I'd been eating a pretty low carb diet but would still occasionally indulge in ice cream or something my wife baked. But after reading Nina Teicholz, Wired to Eat, Gary Taubes, etc, I wanted to see what a year with absolutely no cheating would feel like. About 4 months into this experiment I saw my cholesterol had skyrocketed and learned that I was an LMHR. This of course sent me on a journey down the cholesterol rabbit hole which as you know leads to dozens of other tunnels. Anyway its really interesting that literally the only change I made was cutting junk out completely and this was the result. Btw I've had 2 NMR tests, both had my particle number above 3000. My IR score was 25. They showed that have about 75% large type A LDL which are not associated with atherosclerosis. I've checked my insulin, homocysteine, hsCRP, LPa, and other markers all which have remained optimal. I lift, sprint, row and run. I eat lots of beef and lamb, low carb veggies and fruit. Conventional medicine says I'm at much higher risk for heart disease. Because I cut out sugar? Should we not paying more attention to LDL size or is it possible in an otherwise healthy individual, high LDL may not matter? 4. High Blood Pressure From Salt Consumption? [34:56] Rusty says: My diet, exercise, and the like all need work, but I'm wondering, generally, is there a scientific way of determining if high blood pressure is from salt consumption?  I know you're kind of on the supplemental end of the electrolytes, and it makes total sense for folks out there, in ketosis, and sweating... it's something I intend on doing more of. Is there a way of actually knowing how much salt you're holding onto, so you know you need to supplement or cut back? 5. Electrolytes & Long haul flights [39:04] Karyn says: Hello! I’m lucky enough to be traveling soon and have 2 x 15 hour flights with a 4 hour break between. I plan to stay low carb for the duration of the trip by bringing my own food, but I’m wondering how long haul flights might affect my electrolyte requirements? I currently feel best with an average of 3 LMNT packs per day - should I just maintain that or might I need more or less? Thanks so much, Karyn Share the episode! If something in this show helped you please share the episode with your friends! Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: Download a copy of this transcript here (PDF)
  • The Healthy Rebellion Radio podcast

    Carnivore Lactose Tolerance, Ancestral Food Suitability, Gut Health After C. Diff. | THRR084

    45:36

    Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: https://sfamjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1751-7915.13889?fbclid=IwAR0GfglfrZ5ULeKd-Rt_zIyZDvSjdK5QL3I5tNH0vrMLwTVVr1P88EKQ8ts 1. How to Heal Your Gut after C. Diff [19:51] Kristen says: Hello, I'm not sure if I'm sending my question to the right place - sorry! I've been a follower of Robb's since 2012 when I first read The Paleo Solution. Loved it! My family and I have been paleo ever since. Love the Citrus Salt LMNT packets and wear my LMNT Founders shirt all the time. As soon as I finish up law school and have a little more in my bank account, I'll sign up for the healthy rebellion! My question is about healing your gut after C. Diff. My mom was diagnosed in April and was on what the doctor called "sledgehammer" types of antibiotics through July. She just got the "all clear" from the infection, however, all of the symptoms remain. It is debilitating and she is miserable. Nothing stays in, and I doubt she's absorbing much nutrients. The medical professionals were fantastic at diagnosing and treating, but they haven't provided any guidance on how to heal her gut. What do you recommend? I've recently started her on beef organ supplements (liver, tripe, spleen, and colostrum), but I'm not sure what else to do. Any ideas would be great! Thank you. Digestive Health with REAL Food-Agalee Jacobs Healthy Gut, Healthy You-Dr Ruscio 2. Fasted Exercise Effect On Lipid Panel [23:07] Mary says: What effect might cardio exercise have on a lipid panel?  I was curious to find out how microalbumin would be affected by HIIT the day before (8:30 a.m.) and cardio the morning of (6:00 a.m.).  My PCP had told me years ago exercise would raise it, so I haven't done any strenuous exercise within 48 hours of lab testing.  Since this test was done by my functional medical doctor and not my PCP, I decided to do the experiment since I wouldn't be pressured to start taking an ACE inhibitor again (I've been medication-free for over a year, choosing a functional medical/lifestyle approach to solve the root cause).  Lab tests were done at 7:45 a.m.  To my surprise, microalbumin was the lowest it's ever been, and wouldn't even be measured by my PCP.  However, my lipid panel was thrown off, raising triglycerides (from 38 to 88) and LDL (91 to 134).  Interestingly HDL went down from 100 to 87.  I'm not that worried about my results, as my ratios are still good, but I'm wondering if the exercise could have caused these changes.  I am concerned that my PCP would want me back on a statin. Precision Health Reports: https://precisionhealthreports.com/ Order assessments: https://precisionhealthreports.com/order-assessments CODE: ROBBWOLF for 10% off any Precision Health Report 3. Lactose intolerance [29:07] Clint says: Hey guys! I’ll keep this brief (ha!) - I’ve been a long time listener and I think you’ve answered 5 of my submitted questions over the years, so thanks for that! This question pertains to lactose intolerance. I developed lactose intolerance sometime in the first two years of college. When it first hit me, I would use the lactase pills so that I could eat pizza and ice cream. As the years went by and I read Cordain’s book and yours, I kicked out dairy altogether. I tried ice cream a handful of times after a few years of grain and gluten free eating but even the lactase pill wouldn’t cut it. Fast forward to 2020- for no other reason than curiosity I went full carnivore. I did this for 2-3 months and felt great (other than high intensity exercise being cut way back- I prefer glucose for high intensity work). During my carnivore days I brought back low fat yogurt, cheese, and some milk. To my utter surprise I had no dairy digestive issues. After my carnivore experiment I reintroduced starchy veggies, fruit, and some soaked oats. Just a week off of carnivore, my lactose intolerance came right back. My question is if you’ve heard of anything like this and if you have any guess as to the mechanisms involved? Healed gut allowing proper dairy absorption? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thanks guys! 4. Blood fat and bad bugs in my microbiome [34:06] Scotti says: Hi! I recently participated in a two week blood sugar/blood fat and microbiome test with Zoe.  I’m a 50 year old female. My blood sugar is amazing for my age but my blood fat is quite terrible meaning that fat stays in my blood for a very long time after eating. In addition my microbiome is filled with bad bugs associated with visceral fat. This surprised me as I eat mainly paleo and avoid processed foods and take probiotics regularly. Do you have any suggestions for what to do to get the bad bugs out and the good bugs in? I exercise regularly and have been fit most of my life. Having changed nothing my body fat composition has increased significantly in the last two years. Yes am in menopause so some of that is to be expected but I am always looking to stay as strong and fit as possible. Thanks in advance for your thoughts. 5. Ancestral eating/ancestry [39:54] Meghan says: Hi! I’ve been following your podcast for several years, including bingeing most of the Paleo Solution Podcast episodes.  I absolutely love your work and podcasts, they have been vital in shifting my relationship with food back to a place of focus on health instead of weight. I have a question(and I hope it makes sense) : do you think one’s receptivity to certain foods is linked to the ways that our particular ancestors ate? Like people from areas with more tropical fruits might be less sensitive to those sugars than someone of primarily Northern European heritage that thrives on very low carb/keto like myself? Would some indigenous populations in the US be more likely to tolerate corn and beans in a healthy way than someone from an area that didn’t have those foods until recent history? I’ve been trying to do some digging on this and haven’t ever found specifics on one’s particular genetics playing a role and would love to hear your perspective. Share the episode! If something in this show helped you please share the episode with your friends! Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes Transcript: Download a copy of this transcript here (PDF)
  • The Healthy Rebellion Radio podcast

    DNA Testing For Ideal Diet/Exercise, Nitrates/Nitrites, “Normal” Blood Pressure | THRR083

    38:00

    DNA Testing For Ideal Diet/Exercise, Body Composition Scales, Nitrates/Nitrites, Calcium Intake, What is "Normal" Blood Pressure? Make your health an act of rebellion. Join The Healthy Rebellion Please Subscribe and Review: Apple Podcasts | RSS Submit your questions for the podcast here News topic du jour: After being dismissed by doctors, mom of child with Down syndrome makes a discovery 1. DNA Testing For Ideal Diet/Exercise [12:01] Trevor says: Dear Robb and Nicki, I really enjoy your podcast. I've gone from only listening when the topic looked interesting to listening to every episode because there's always something good or interesting. I appreciate your alls' free thinking mindset and news topics. I've also bought a big ol' box of LMNT and really like the Watermelon flavor. My question is about DNA testing. Do you think there's any value to having this done to determine ideal diet, exercise, and overall lifestyle cues? Or is trial and error a better route? If you think testing is valuable, is there a company you can recommend? Thanks, Trevor 2. Body Composition Scales [20:21] Danny says: Are any of the scales on the market that claim to measure your body composition worth looking into or are they all pretty much bullshit 3. Nitrates/Nitrites [24:44] Mackenzie says: I've been thinking about my Nitrate/Nitrite consumption lately. The ideas around Nitrate/Nitrite seems to be a bit confusing because it's present in natural foods but also added to processed foods. I eat a fair bit of Kimchi, some deli meat, condiments like Sriracha - in addition to loving things like beets, spinach, celery..etc. I don't appear to have any adverse reactions to Nitrate/Nitrite consumption, so with that said, would it be better for my overall health to cut out those more processed foods? Thanks! 4. Calcium Intake [29:04] Megan says: Hi Robb and Nicki, I love your show! I had a question regarding getting adequate calcium when not eating dairy. I eat a whole food diet, no processed foods (no gluten, dairy, soy, or corn). I eat lots of grass fed beef, organic chicken thighs, wild shrimp, and wild scallops. I do not eat sardines or fish bones though. Is it possible to get enough calcium when not consuming dairy products or fish bones? Thanks for your time! Megan 5. What is "Normal" Blood Pressure? [33:02] Amy says: Hey Guys! So I went to donate blood today and was refused because my blood pressure was too low. Eek! I usually run about 90-something over 60-something, which I realize is already pretty low. Today, I was 88/55, as measured by a machine and not manually by the lab tech. (Don't know if that makes it more or less accurate.) So it was what we might call "freakishly low," but the thing is, I FELT FINE. Physical energy was good, mental outlook was all right -- no issues. Nothing about how I felt all day would suggest that my BP was "too low." (I went to donate around 12pm.) So my question is, for a mostly low-carbing, very fit 35-year-old woman, what is a "normal" blood pressure, and more important, is BP another parameter we should add to blood glucose, HbA1C, triglycerides, and other markers whose "normal" ranges are based on the sedentary, sick, and inflamed masses and therefore reflect what's *common* more than what's normal/optimal? (I'm reminded of how Robb's wife's ob/gyn was surprised at what a relatively "easy" pregnancy she had. Well, yeah, compared to all the walking, talking chronic disease bags he/she normally sees, Nikki's health was off the charts. *Of course* she had a better time of it.) I do realize that when it comes to BP, there *is* such a thing as too low, but I'm wondering what that is, as long as someone feels no adverse effects. (Kind of like glucose...I've tested and seen myself in the mid-to-high 60s and felt FINE. Yay, fat adaptation.) Hunter-gatherers as models in public health Sponsor: The Healthy Rebellion Radio is sponsored by our electrolyte company, LMNT. Proper hydration is more than just drinking water. You need electrolytes too! Check out The Healthy Rebellion Radio sponsor LMNT for grab-and-go electrolyte packets to keep you at your peak! They give you all the electrolytes want, none of the stuff you don’t. Click here to get your LMNT electrolytes

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