JAMA Medical News podcast

JAMA Medical News

JAMA Network

Discussions of timely topics in clinical medicine, biomedical research, public health, health policy, and more, featured in the Medical News section of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.

113 episodios

  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    After 12 Years, NIH Director Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD, Seeks His Next Chapter

    35:51

    JAMA Medical News Associate Managing Editor Jennifer Abbasi talks with physician-geneticist Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD, as he steps down as director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and returns full-time to his laboratory at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Collins discusses the NIH’s biggest accomplishments and challenges during his historic tenure, shares what he will and won’t miss about the job, and much more. Related Content: After 12 Years, NIH Director Francis S. Collins Seeks His Next Chapter
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    November 2021 Medical News Summary

    17:18

    The Flawed Science of Antibody Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Immunity, Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Monoclonal Antibodies for Preexposure COVID-19 Prophylaxis, Trials Test Mushrooms and Herbs as Anti–COVID-19 Agents. Related Article(s): The Flawed Science of Antibody Testing for SARS-CoV-2 Immunity Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Monoclonal Antibodies for Preexposure COVID-19 Prophylaxis Trials Test Mushrooms and Herbs as Anti–COVID-19 Agents
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

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  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    Highlights From the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2021

    30:00

    JAMA Medical News Associate Managing Editor Jennifer Abbasi talks with Manesh Patel, MD, about the latest trials and topics from the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions meeting. Patel is chief of the division of cardiology at Duke University School of Medicine and this year’s Scientific Sessions conference chair. Related Content: Association of Apolipoprotein B–Containing Lipoproteins and Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Individuals With and Without Atherosclerosis
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    October 2021 Medical News Summary

    20:30

    COVID-19 Crisis Advances Efforts to Reimagine Nursing Homes; Moving COVID-19 Testing Out of the Clinic and Into the Home; The Lingua Franca of Addiction—Stigmatizing Words That Wound Related Content: COVID-19 Crisis Advances Efforts to Reimagine Nursing Homes COVID-19 Testing Moves Out of the Clinic and Into the Home The Lingua Franca of Addiction—Stigmatizing Words That Wound
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    A New Vision for Nursing Homes

    24:52

    The longstanding shortcomings of the US nursing home model became more visible during the COVID-19 crisis. Terry Fulmer, PhD, RN, a geriatric nurse practitioner and president of the John A. Hartford Foundation in New York City, discusses the challenges skilled nursing facilities face and shares her vision for nursing homes that better serve residents and support the workforce. Related Content: COVID-19 Crisis Advances Efforts to Reimagine Nursing Homes Socially Assistive Robots Help Patients Make Behavioral Changes
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    September 2021 Medical News Summary

    17:19

    After Mildest Flu Season Ever, Influenza Experts Wonder What Comes Next; Why Farmworkers Need More Than New Laws for Protection From Heat-Related Illness; COVID-19 Sets Back Efforts to See the Person in the ICU Patient Related Content: After Mildest Flu Season Ever, Influenza Experts Wonder What Comes Next Why Farmworkers Need More Than New Laws for Protection From Heat-Related Illness How COVID-19 Made It Even Tougher to Know ICU Patients as Individuals
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    Rebounding From COVID-19’s Reversal of Recent Progress in the ICU

    21:11

    Many patients experience neurocognitive deficits, PTSD, and generalized weakness and disability following an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. JAMA Medical News Senior Writer Rita Rubin talks with E. Wesley Ely, MD, MPH, a professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, about ICU aftereffects, post-acute COVID-19 syndrome, and how the coronavirus pandemic, particularly hospitals’ restrictions on visitors, impeded progress made since the 1990s in caring for the critically ill. Related Content: How COVID-19 Made It Even Tougher to Know ICU Patients as Individuals
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    9/11 Responders’ Health 20 Years Later, Part 2

    15:37

    More than half of the 80 000 emergency personnel, volunteers, and recovery and cleanup workers known to have responded to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the crash site near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, have at least 1 certified physical or mental health condition related to their exposures. First responder Terrence Jordan, a retired lieutenant with the Fire Department of the City of New York, shares his story. Related Content: Twenty Years After 9/11, Responders Are Still Healing 9/11 Responders’ Health 20 Years Later, Part 1
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    9/11 Responders’ Health 20 Years Later, Part 1

    25:18

    More than half of the 80 000 emergency personnel, volunteers, and recovery and cleanup workers known to have responded to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the crash site near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, have at least 1 certified physical or mental health condition related to their exposures. Pulmonologist David Prezant, MD, chief medical officer for the Fire Department of the City of New York and a professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, shares his 9/11 story and updates us on how the responders are doing 20 years after the events. Related Content: Twenty Years After 9/11, Responders Are Still Healing 9/11 Responders’ Health 20 Years Later, Part 2
  • JAMA Medical News podcast

    August 2021 Medical News Summary

    15:13

    FDA’s Approval of New Alzheimer Drug Raises Many Questions; Überantibodies From Recovered COVID-19 Patients Could Spur New Therapeutics and Vaccines; Detecting Kids’ Broken Hearts—Cardiac Screening Advised During Well-Child Visits Related Content: Recently Approved Alzheimer Drug Raises Questions That Might Never Be Answered Überantibodies From Recovered COVID-19 Patients Could Spur New Therapeutics and Vaccines Detecting Kids’ Broken Hearts—Cardiac Screening Advised During Well-Child Visits

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