The Stakes podcast

The Stakes

WNYC Studios

The Stakes is a show about social change, hosted by Kai Wright. We live in extreme times—a climate on the verge of crisis, an economy built on inequality and a political system that feels like it’s falling apart. So, how’d we get to this point? And what happens next? From democracy to healthcare, from pop culture to the environment, our reporters are working to understand why we live the way we do—and why it matters. Because if we can better understand the society we‘ve got, maybe we can figure out how to create one that works for more people. The Stakes is produced by WNYC Studios, home of other great podcasts including Radiolab, Death, Sex & Money, On the Media, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin.

18 Episoder

  • The Stakes podcast

    There Goes the Neighborhood: Miami, Part 3

    24:04

    Haitian migrants fled a violent dictatorship and built a new community in Miami’s Little Haiti, far from the coast and on land that luxury developers didn’t want. But with demand for up-market apartments surging, their neighborhood is suddenly attractive to builders. That’s in part because it sits on high ground, in a town concerned about sea level rise. But also, because Miami is simply running out of land to build upon.  In the final episode of our series on “climate gentrification,” WLRN reporter Nadege Greene asks one man what it’s like to be in the path of a land rush. Before you listen, check out parts one and two. In this episode, we hear from: - Louis Rosemont, artist in Little Haiti - Carl Juste, photojournalist for the Miami Herald - Ned Murray of Florida International University - Greg West, CEO of Zom Living development firm - Jane Gilbert, Chief Resilience Officer for the City of Miami Reported and produced by Kai Wright and Nadege Green. This is the final installment of a three-part series produced in partnership with WLRN in Miami. WNYC’s health coverage is supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Working to build a Culture of Health that ensures everyone in America has a fair and just opportunity for health and well-being. More at RWJF.org.
  • The Stakes podcast

    There Goes the Neighborhood: Miami, Part 2

    21:19

    Valencia Gunder used to dismiss her grandfather’s warnings: “They’re gonna steal our communities because it don't flood.” She thought, Who would want this place? But Valencia’s grandfather knew something she didn’t: People in black Miami have seen this before.  In the second episode of our series on “climate gentrification,” reporter Christopher Johnson tells the story of Overtown, a segregated black community that was moved, en masse, because the city wanted the space for something else. If you haven't heard part one, start there first. In this episode, we also hear from: - Agnes and Naomi Rolle, childhood residents of Overtown - Marvin Dunn, researcher at Florida International University - James Mungin II, co-founder of The Roots Collective Reported and produced by Kai Wright, Nadege Green and Christopher Johnson. This is part two of a three-part series produced in partnership with WLRN in Miami. WNYC’s health coverage is supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Working to build a Culture of Health that ensures everyone in America has a fair and just opportunity for health and well-being. More at RWJF.org.
  • The Stakes podcast

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  • The Stakes podcast

    There Goes the Neighborhood: Miami, Part 1

    23:29

    In Miami’s Little Haiti neighborhood, residents are feeling a push from the familiar forces of gentrification: hasty evictions, new developments, rising commercial rents. But there’s something else happening here, too—a process that may intensify the affordability crisis in cities all over the country. Little Haiti sits on high ground, in a city that’s facing increasing pressure from rising sea levels and monster storms. For years, researchers at Harvard University’s Design School have been trying to identify if and how the changing climate will reshape the real estate market globally. In Miami’s Little Haiti, they have found an ideal case study for what’s been dubbed “climate gentrification.” We hear from: - Jesse Keenan, Harvard University Graduate School of Design - Mimi Sanon-Jules, entrepreneur in Little Haiti Reported and produced by Kai Wright, Nadege Green and Christopher Johnson. This is part one of a three-part series produced in partnership with WLRN in Miami. WNYC’s health coverage is supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Working to build a Culture of Health that ensures everyone in America has a fair and just opportunity for health and well-being. More at RWJF.org.
  • The Stakes podcast

    The Next Debt Crisis That No One's Talking About

    28:24

    An ambitious young immigrant needs a car and ends up with a loan he can’t afford. His lender, Credit Acceptance, specializes in subprime car loans -- lending to people with poor credit at exorbitant interest rates. Reporter Anjali Kamat tells the story of one man’s journey with his Credit Acceptance loan from a used car lot to a courtroom, and traces how, a decade after subprime mortgages brought down the economy, subprime car loans remain a favorite on Wall Street. We hear from: - Shanna Tallarico, Consumer Debt Attorney at New York Legal Assistance Group - Michael Barr, Dean of Gerald R Ford School of Public Policy at University of Michigan and former Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions at the Department of Treasury This report was produced with support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting as part of a collaboration between APM Reports, KCUR in Kansas City, KPCC in Southern California, WABE in Atlanta and WNYC.
  • The Stakes podcast

    Denial at the Trump Hotel

    28:32

    It's becoming harder and harder to deny that the Earth is warming. But climate change skeptics not only have a plan for how to keep the public arguing about the validity of the science, they also have the ear of the most powerful person on the planet. Reporter Amanda Aronczyk goes inside the Trump International Hotel in Washington to attend one of the largest gatherings of climate deniers in the country and discovers that their strategy could work.  This is the story of the origin and future of climate change skepticism. Hosted by Kai Wright. Reported by Amanda Aronczyk. Edited by Christopher Werth. 
  • The Stakes podcast

    White Like Me

    23:23

    Whiteness, as an idea and as an identity, is not as fixed as many people believe. Over the centuries, Western societies have defined and redefined it. But always, it has served to delineate who gets access to rights and privileges, and who doesn't. In this episode, we meet an Italian American family as they reflect on a time when they weren't yet white in America, and consider how that changed. And we explore the role white identity politics have always played in American elections. We hear from: - Chris Arnade, author of Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America - Nell Irvin Painter, author of The History of White People  - Joshua Freeman, Distinguished Professor of History at CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies and author of Behemoth: A History of the Factory and the Making of the Modern World - Fred Gardaphe, Distinguished Professor of Italian American Studies at Queens College Hosted by Kai Wright. Produced by Joseph Capriglione. 
  • The Stakes podcast

    A History of Persuasion: Part 3

    31:45

    Silicon Valley’s so-called “millionaire maker” is a behavioral scientist who foresaw the power of putting persuasion at the heart of the tech world’s business model. But pull back the curtain that surrounds the industry’s behemoths, and you'll find a cadre of engineers and executives that's small enough to rein in. This is the final installment of our three-part series. If you haven't heard parts one and two, start there first. In this episode, we hear from: - Alexandra Rutherford, Professor in the Department of Psychology at York University in Toronto and author of Beyond the Box: B.F. Skinner's Technology of Behaviour from Laboratory to Life, 1950s-1970s - Ian Leslie, author of “The Scientists Who Make Apps Addictive” - B.J. Fogg, Director of the Stanford University "Behavior Design Lab” - Tristan Harris, Co-Founder & Executive Director of the Center for Humane Technology - Dorothy Glancy, Professor of Law at Santa Clara University - Senator Mark Warner of Virginia Hosted by Kai Wright. Reported by Amanda Aronczyk. WNYC’s health coverage and The Stakes is supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Jane and Gerald Katcher and the Katcher Family Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Thanks to Andy Lanset, WNYC Archives, Lizette Royer Barton at the Center for the History of Psychology and Diana Bachman at the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan.
  • The Stakes podcast

    A History of Persuasion: Part 2

    26:17

    Ted Kaczynski had been a boy genius. Then he became the Unabomber. After years of searching for him, the FBI finally caught him in his remote Montana cabin, along with thousands of pages of his writing. Those pages revealed Kaczynski's hatred towards a field of psychology called "behaviorism," the key to the link between him and James McConnell. This is part two of our three-part series. If you haven't heard part one, listen here first. In this episode, we hear from: - Philip Bradley, Harvard contemporary of Ted Kaczynski - Alston Chase, author of A Mind for Murder: The Education of the Unabomber and the Origins of Modern Terrorism - Donald Max Noel, former FBI agent and author of UNABOMBER: How the FBI Broke Its Own Rules to Capture the Terrorist Ted Kaczynski - Dr. Charles Seigerman, former student of James McConnell and Certified Neuropsychologist - Greg Stejskal, former FBI agent - Larry Stern, Professor of Sociology at Collin College Hosted by Kai Wright. Reported by Amanda Aronczyk. WNYC’s health coverage and The Stakes is supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Jane and Gerald Katcher and the Katcher Family Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Thank you to Lizette Royer Barton at the Center for the History of Psychology and Diana Bachman at the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. Special thanks to Larry Stern, Professor of Sociology at Collin College and to Alexandra Rutherford, Professor in the Department of Psychology at York University in Toronto and author of Beyond the Box: B.F. Skinner's Technology of Behaviour from Laboratory to Life, 1950s-1970s.
  • The Stakes podcast

    A History of Persuasion: Part 1

    21:04

    Infinite scrolling. Push notifications. Autoplay. Our devices and apps were designed to keep us engaged and looking for as long as possible. Now, we’ve woken up from years on social media and our phones to discover we've been manipulated by unaccountable powers using persuasive psychological tricks. But this isn’t the first time. In this three-part series of The Stakes, we look at the winding story of the science of persuasion -- and our collective reaction to it. In this episode: A once-famous psychologist who became embroiled in controversy, and how the Unabomber tried to kill him. Already heard this one? Continue to part two. We hear from: - Larry Stern, Professor of Sociology at Collin College - Nicklaus Suino, writer, martial arts expert, attorney and business consultant Hosted by Kai Wright. Reported by Amanda Aronczyk. WNYC’s health coverage and The Stakes is supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Jane and Gerald Katcher and the Katcher Family Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Thanks to Lizette Royer Barton at the Center for the History of Psychology and Diana Bachman at the Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan for the use of the educational films “Battle for the Mind” and “Heads and/or Tails” featuring psychologist James McConnell.
  • The Stakes podcast

    The Invention of 'Sexual Harassment'

    24:46

    If you want to change the law, you have to name the problem. That's why, in 1975, five to eight women in a room in Ithaca, New York came up with two words that changed the law, and the workplace, forever. But as you'll hear, victory really has a thousand mothers. You'll hear from: - Linda Hirschman, author of Reckoning: The Epic Battle Against Sexual Abuse and Harassment - Susan Meyer, a founder of Working Women United - Faith Hochberg, former Federal Judge  Hosted by Kai Wright. Produced by Jessica Miller.

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