The Exclusive Career Coach podcast

The Exclusive Career Coach

Lesa Edwards

The Exclusive Career Coach is presented by Lesa Edwards, CEO of Exclusive Career Coaching. This weekly podcast covers all things career management including job search strategies, interviewing tips, networking tools, maximizing LinkedIn, salary negotiations, and managing your mindset around your career.

206 Episoder

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    210: How to Conduct a Job Search When You Have a Full-Time Job

    26:45

    Starting on January 25th, I am offering a group coaching program called Land Your Dream Job. This is an 8-week small group coaching program for a maximum of 15 participants – focused on planning and executing a targeted, proactive job search that will support you in landing your dream job. Land Your Dream Job will help you:  ü Identify exactly what you are looking for in your dream job and ideal employer ü Develop a comprehensive job search strategy, customized to you ü Learn how to network in a targeted, proactive way (I call it Bow-and-Arrow networking) ü Overcome mental blocks that are holding you back from realizing your career goals ü Get the support and expertise you need to help you through the inevitable lows of a job search – and celebrate your highs!   What do you get with the Land Your Dream Job group coaching program? ü Eight weekly, 1-hour Zoom sessions – they will be recorded if you can’t be there live ü A maximum of 15 participants – you’ll get the attention you need ü A designated accountability partner ü Facebook group for questions, encouragement, and sharing job leads ü A member vault with session recordings, handouts, and supplemental materials  To register:https://lydjjoin.carrd.co/ For a 15-minute call to ask questions:https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/15-minute-call  Today, I wanted to share strategies for those of you who will be conducting a job search this year while working full-time. You’ve probably heard the expression that looking for a job IS a full-time job. But what if you already have a full-time job? The biggest issue I see for people in this situation is the tendency to put their job search on the back burner because they have so many priorities going on at work. This is especially prevalent in people who aren’t unhappy in their current job. To be clear, this is a job search that is targeted and proactive – not just passively looking at job boards or waiting for recruiters to contact you. There’s nothing wrong with a passive job search; however, today I want to talk about how to conduct a job search that is focused and active. I’m not going to talk about the obvious things you need to do in any job search, like update your resume and LI profile. Here, then, are my top six strategies: 1.    Set a SMART goal.I love the quote, “A goal without a plan is just a wish.” SMART goals are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time-Sensitive. You can set a SMART goal for the desired result, such as “I will be in a new position by September 1st of this year.” You can also set SMART goals for the steps along the way, such as “I will reach out to Bob Jones at XYZ company by January 15th.” Here’s why this is important: goals keep us focused and on-task. They keep us from blowing off our job search plans in favor of something more pressing at work.  2.    Establish your WHY. I encourage you to write down your why – essentially, it is a manifest for why you want a new position. It has to be compelling and meaningful to you. You can choose whether to share your WHY with anyone else. You WHY could center around a new skill you want to develop, a new industry you want to enter, the contribution you want to make in the world. It can be a financial WHY, especially if is paired with another WHY. Here’s an example:“I want a new position because, now that I’ve earned the PMP designation, I want to grow that skill set into a strength.” Another example:“I want to work in the non-profit sector because I am committed to ___”(whatever the non-profit does). Here’s why this is important: We humans tend to lack commitment to something when we don’t know why we are doing it. The busyness of life and our many obligations tend to get in the way.  3.    Block off time – and get specific. This is a big one – again, work obligations can easily usurp our intentions if we don’t calendar in time to conduct our job search. Perhaps you block off time for one networking lunch a week, or to attend one networking function every month. Maybe you allot 15 minutes per day, as I do, to networking activities on LI. Just as important as blocking off the time is to set specific goals for that time. For example, your 15 minutes on LI might involve reaching out to a certain number of people to connect with or posting/commenting in the groups you belong to. Make sure you are realistic in blocking off time – don’t set an unrealistic goal for yourself. Here’s why this is important: Work obligations can seem more important – more urgent – in the moment. When I know this is how I planned to spend this time, it allows me to relax into the activity, rather than feel stressed that I’m not doing something else. And by listing exactly what you will do during that time, you won’t waste part of the time figuring out what to do.  4.    Mindset matters.Mindset matters in every area of your life – and your job search is certainly no exception. I’ve done plenty of podcasts on mindset, so I won’t go deep here. Here are a few tips: -Be aware of what you are thinking – about your job search, the job market, your qualifications, how long it is taking to find a new job. Don’t beat yourself up for having negative thoughts – just notice them. -Decide what you want to think – on purpose. Practice your new thoughts so they become like “muscle memory” – creating new neural pathways in your brain. When you find yourself avoiding your job search activities, revisit your thoughts. It always starts there. Here’s why this is important: It is impossible to change our behavior without a corresponding change in our beliefs. Either we’ll avoid the activities that will lead to a new job, or we will go through the motions with the wrong energy.  5.    Weekly rewards.If you have blocked off time for your job search this week and did the things you decided ahead of time to do towards your job search in that time, then you deserve a reward. Many people make the mistake of waiting until they get their new job to give themselves a reward. THE NEW JOB IS THE REWARD. You need encouragement along the way. Perhaps it is treating yourself to a round of golf or a new outfit. Whatever is rewarding to you. You could also reward yourself each day. For example, if you love going to the gym or having a glass of wine, you require yourself to do the job search work first. Here’s why this is important: You are improving your relationship with yourself – having your own back in terms of following through on your commitments to yourself. This is a skill set that will serve you in every area of your life.  6.    Remember that networking should be a two-way street. As I teach networking, it is an equal exchange of energy. Meaning: you give as much value as you get. For example, you are meeting with an old colleague. When you get together, you begin by asking about them – what they think of their new employer, what challenges they are facing, where their frustrations lie. During this conversation, you are providing value. Whether it is a listening ear, a best practice, or a referral, you are helping that person out. This is happening BEFORE you ask for anything. Why this is important: Most people don’t like the feeling of “all take and no give” in networking, so this approach feels better to you AND you are much more likely to get the assistace YOU need by providing value FIRST.    
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    209: Developing Your Elevator Pitch

    14:49

    Starting on January 25th, I am offering a group coaching program called Land Your Dream Job. This is an 8-week small group coaching program for a maximum of 15 participants – focused on planning and executing a targeted, proactive job search that will support you in landing your dream job. Land Your Dream Job will help you:  ü Identify exactly what you are looking for in your dream job and ideal employer ü Develop a comprehensive job search strategy, customized to you ü Learn how to network in a targeted, proactive way (I call it Bow-and-Arrow networking) ü Overcome mental blocks that are holding you back from realizing your career goals ü Get the support and expertise you need to help you through the inevitable lows of a job search – and celebrate your highs!   What do you get with the Land Your Dream Job group coaching program? ü Eight weekly, 1-hour Zoom sessions – they will be recorded if you can’t be there live ü A maximum of 15 participants – you’ll get the attention you need ü A designated accountability partner ü Facebook group for questions, encouragement, and sharing job leads ü A member vault with session recordings, handouts, and supplemental materials To register:https://lydjjoin.carrd.co/ For a 15-minute call to ask questions:https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/15-minute-call Happy New Year! Let’s talk about how to develop the perfect elevator pitch. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the concept, an elevator pitch is your 30-second commercial. The idea is that you could say it going from one floor to the next on an elevator. Your elevator pitch can be used as you introduce yourself at networking events, when you meet people by happenstance, and of course when you are on the elevator. Here’s the formula: I help_____ (this is who you serve) Do/know/understand_____ (this is how you serve them) So they can_____. (this is the result the people you serve can expect)  This is my elevator pitch: I help high-achieving, college-educated professionals plan and execute a targeted, proactive job search so they can land their dream job.  Here’s an example for a mid-level learning & development professional: I help employees develop the soft skills they need to get promoted and have greater career satisfaction.  Here’s an example for an IT professional: I help companies become more efficient so they can increase profitability and streamline processes.  Here’s one for a senior HR professional: I help companies attract, train, and retain top-notch employees so they can reduce turnover.  The bottom line is that you are, at best, piquing the other person’s interest so they will want to know more about you. At worst, you aren’t boring them with more information than they need or want. Your assignment is to take this formula and come up with five variations of your elevator pitch. Practice them, out loud, in front of a mirror. You may even want to practice with a friend or colleague. Then select the one that feels the best to you – that you will feel most comfortable saying to a stranger. Here’s the formula again: I help_____ (this is who you serve) Do/know/understand_____ (this is how you serve them) So they can_____. (this is the result the people you serve can expect)  
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    208: Use Your V.O.I.C.E. to Become a Fearless Speaker (with Carissa Karner)

    30:23

    Be sure to sign up for the special webinar in January – The 3 Things You Haven’t Thought About For Your Next Job Search.  Here’s what you’ll gain from this webinar: ü Clarity around EXACTLY what you are looking for in an employer – after all, how will you know if you have found IT if you don’t even know what IT is? ü Awareness of your values and skills, so you can make sure an employer meshes with your values and appreciates your skills ü Deep understanding of your professional purpose – what contributions you are uniquely designed to make  This is a hands-on workshop (no passive lurkers allowed!) where you’ll be asked to think about what you really want in your next job. You’ll do solo work, followed by small group time to share your insights and intentions with other participants. Guaranteed: You’ll know yourself infinitely better at the end of this hour. You’ll know what you want and why you want it. You’ll have focus and direction. Here’s the link: https://3thingswebinar.carrd.co/   Carissa and I speak about how to become a fearless speaker. This topic is especially important for women, and Carissa tells us why. Carissa talks specifically about becoming a fearless speaker during job interviews, when giving presentations, and when you are having one-on-one, difficult conversations. She explains how to bring down our anxiety, boost our self-confidence, and be extremely prepared for these conversations. Carissa Karner is a certified World Class Speaking Coach, a certified Clini-Coach, a licensed psychotherapist, a TEDx presenter, and an actress. She pulls together an arsenal of tools to help you get confident about speaking in public, knowing what to say and how to say it effectively, and how to create mic-dropping speeches that can change lives. To learn the framework Carissa outlines in this episode, download her FREE Use Your V.O.I.C.E. workbook here:https://fearlessspeak.com/useyourvoice You can find Carissa at: fearlessspeak.comInstagram: @carissakarnerLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/carissakarnerFacebook: facebook.com/groups/fearlessspeakers  Are you in the wrong job that chips away at you every day? The CareerSpring document and coaching program will help you find a job that uses your zone of genius, recognizes your value, and pays you what you’re worth.  If you’re ready to take your job search to the next level by working with a highly experienced professional with a track record of client success, schedule a complimentary consult to learn more:  https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/zoom-meetings2  
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    207: Six Simple Career-Advancing Steps to Take Over the Holidays

    17:20

    Be sure to sign up for the special webinar in January – The 3 Things You Haven’t Thought About For Your Next Job Search.  Here’s what you’ll gain from this webinar: -Clarity around EXACTLY what you are looking for in an employer – after all, how will you know if you have found IT if you don’t even know what IT is? -Awareness of your values and skills, so you can make sure an employer meshes with your values and appreciates your skills -Deep understanding of your professional purpose – what contributions you are uniquely designed to make  This is a hands-on workshop (no passive lurkers allowed!) where you’ll be asked to think about what you really want in your next job. You’ll do solo work, followed by small group time to share your insights and intentions with other participants. Guaranteed: You’ll know yourself infinitely better at the end of this hour. You’ll know what you want and why you want it. You’ll have focus and direction. Here’s the link: https://3thingswebinar.carrd.co/   The holidays are a time for family, rest, good food…a time to unplug from the hustle and grind that, for many of us, defines our work life the rest of the year. In the midst of that family time and relaxation, you have an opportunity to reflect and journal on your professional life. Review 2021 and set intentions for 2022. Here are six simple ways to help your career during the holidays.   1.    Give yourself credit.  Where did you slay it in 2021? Where did you exceed expectations? What are you most proud of? WRITE IT DOWN. And then practice gratitude for your achievements in 2021. Give yourself a huge pat on the back!  2.    Write down the not-so-great.  It’s also important to journal where you missed the mark – not from a place of judgment or condemnation, but from a place of observation. Like you are a dispassionate observer of your year. In addition to where you missed the mark, answer WHY you missed the mark. Was it in your control or out of your control? Did you change your mind or revise the goal during the year so that it served you better? As part of this journaling process, ask yourself these three questions: What do I want to STOP doing?What do I want to START doing?What do I want to CONTINUE doing?  3.    Get one big professional goal for 2022.  Remember: goals need to be SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time-Sensitive. As part of this step, break that year-long goal into 90-day increments: What will you have accomplished by March 30th? June 30th? September 30th? Keep this goal in the forefront of your mind throughout the year and check in every 3 months to measure your progress.  4.    Set a big personal goal too.  Life is all about balance, so make sure you’re moving forward in your personal life as well. Use the same process to set, create 90-day benchmarks for, and evaluate your personal goal.   5.    Eliminate 2-3 tolerations in your life.  Think about the things in your work or personal life that really drive you nuts – and yet, in many cases, you’ve never really thought about how to change that annoyance. These things are creating low-level stress in your life – or maybe not low-level at all. You are diverting precious energy into these areas of your life. Start by writing down as many things as you can think of at home and work that make you nuts. Step two is to categorize each in the following way: C=Continue to tolerate for now R=Resolve this annoyance entirely H=Get help to minimize or eliminate Example of C:-My suitcase is breaking down and it doesn’t roll very well anymore. I’m going to keep an eye out for a really good sale on the brand I want and purchase new luggage before my next trip. Example of R: -My closet is so disorganized that it stresses me out. I’m going to dedicate 2 hours this Saturday to fixing this problem myself, and I’ll buy some storage solutions to really up level my closet. Example of H: I can’t stand that my kitchen sink is constantly dripping. I’m going to hire a plumber or handyman THIS WEEK to get this fixed.  Here are some additional annoyances you could consider: -Taking time out of your precious weekend to clean the house, mow the lawn, etc. -Anything about your transportation that is causing you stress -Anything that is disorganized and consequently requires extra time to navigate -Anything you are overdue on – doctor’s appointments, oil change, filing taxes -Any important conversations you have been putting off – with your boss, a co-worker, a family member  6.    Drop into your future self.  It is December 31, 2022, and you’ve achieved your big personal and professional goal. You removed several annoyances from your life. You are firing on all cylinders. Drop into this space – I recommend journaling, but you can also say it out loud or meditate on it. Picture the best possible scenario for how your 2022 has gone – and bask in your achievements. You’ve got this!   Are you in the wrong job that chips away at you every day? The CareerSpring document and coaching program will help you find a job that uses your zone of genius, recognizes your value, and pays you what you’re worth.  If you’re ready to take your job search to the next level by working with a highly experienced professional with a track record of client success, schedule a complimentary consult to learn more:  https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/zoom-meetings2
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    205: Your Resume: How to Find the Balance Between Flash and Substance

    13:31

    Be sure to sign up for the special webinar in January – The 3 Things You Haven’t Thought About For Your Next Job Search.  Here’s what you’ll gain from this webinar: ü Clarity around EXACTLY what you are looking for in an employer – after all, how will you know if you have found IT if you don’t even know what IT is? ü Awareness of your values and skills, so you can make sure an employer meshes with your values and appreciates your skills ü Deep understanding of your professional purpose – what contributions you are uniquely designed to make  This is a hands-on workshop (no passive lurkers allowed!) where you’ll be asked to think about what you really want in your next job. You’ll do solo work, followed by small group time to share your insights and intentions with other participants. Guaranteed: You’ll know yourself infinitely better at the end of this hour. You’ll know what you want and why you want it. You’ll have focus and direction. Here’s the link:    I want to begin today’s podcast by saying that the perspective I am presenting in this episode is mine, and mine alone. Having said that, I AM one of fewer than 25 Master Resume Writers in the world, so my perspective carries a fair amount of weight. On various social media accounts I follow of resume writing groups and individuals, I am seeing a disturbing trend of flash over substance. At first glance, these resumes LOOK good, but when you actually read the documents, there’s no depth. No metrics. Here are five specific concerns I have about these resumes.  1.    Measuring your opinion of your soft skills.  I’m seeing graphs where the candidate has ranked his or her communication skills, emotional intelligence, etc. SEEING THIS ON A RESUME MAKES ME CRAZY. Here’s why: There’s no attribution – did you take a survey? Did someone say these things about you? Did you just decide you were great in these areas? The second thing that makes me crazy about these graphs is that they are almost always divorced from the rest of the resume. Where are you showing evidence of your strengths in these areas, and how are you spoon-feeding the reader as to the connection? You absolutely cannot expect the reader to make those connections on their own in the approximately 10 seconds they take for an initial pass on your resume.  2.    Little, if any, content under each job you’ve held.  And, if you do have some content, it is a sentence or bullet about your job duties, rather than your achievements. This hurts you in two ways: There are few, if any, keywords in this section to help you score well with the ATS. Secondly, if this keyword-shy resume actually gets seen by a human, there’s very little there to compel them to reach out to schedule an interview.  3.    Adding things that STILL aren’t considered acceptable on resumes.  If you are in North America, there is no reason for you to have a picture on your resume unless you are an actor or model. We don’t care that you like to snow ski, unless you are applying for a job as a ski instructor (in which case the love of skiing should be obvious). We CERTAINLY don’t want to know your family situation, number of children, age, or height. When these things show on a resume, I am left feeling that this is a candidate who is either a) trying to be different, but not doing it in a positive way, or b) clueless about how to present themselves as a viable candidate. Either way, I’m left cold.  4.    Symbols next to your phone number, email, etc.  You have a series of 10 numbers at the top of your resume: 3 numbers, followed by 3 more numbers, followed by 4 numbers. Gee – I wonder what that could be? Real mystery. You have [email protected]m – what could that mean? Don’t insult the reader’s intelligence by using these symbols.  5.    A layout that is confusing.  I’ve seen far too many resumes that have three columns, or the specific information I am looking for isn’t easy to find, or the graphics take up incredibly valuable real estate. Margins that are too small to effectively print the document, or so large that you need multiple pages to fit everything in. You simply didn’t use the real estate in a way that serves you. Finally, you’ve created a document that cannot be used for submission to an ATS, so you’ll either need a parallel document that is unformatted, or it will take you five times as long to apply to each position.  Are you in the wrong job that chips away at you every day? The CareerSpring document and coaching program will help you find a job that uses your zone of genius, recognizes your value, and pays you what you’re worth.  If you’re ready to take your job search to the next level by working with a highly experienced professional with a track record of client success, schedule a complimentary consult to learn more:  https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/zoom-meetings2  
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    204: Five Unusual Things to Be Thankful for in 2021

    20:22

    Don’t forget to sign up for “The 3 Things You HAVEN’T Thought About For Your Next Job Search” webinar on January 11, 2022. Here’s what you’ll get: ü Clarity around EXACTLY what you are looking for in an employer – after all, how will you know if you have found IT if you don’t even know what IT is?ü Awareness of your values and skills, so you can make sure an employer meshes with your values and appreciates your skillsü Deep understanding of your professional purpose – what contribution you are uniquely designed to make Link to register: https://3thingswebinar.carrd.co/ Each year at Thanksgiving in the U.S., I do an episode on the five unusual things I am thankful for that year. These are things that might, on the surface, not seem like blessings – but have been. And I show parallels to how this, or something similar, might show up in your life. Here is my list for 2021: 1.    I am thankful for friends who weren’t. This year, I completed relationships with a couple who I thought were two of my best friends. The reason for completing these relationships isn’t important, but here’s what I learned: a.    Not everyone is meant to stay in your life for the rest of your life. b.    Completing a relationship with close friends forces you to own your part in the relationship’s “failure” – and let the rest of it go. c.     In my particular situation, it forced me to focus on what I think of me – what other people think of me is none of my business. d.    Completing a relationship opens you up to room for new friendships. You can’t effectively navigate a lifetime of relationships if you only ever add people – never subtract. Do any of these points resonate with you? Are there people in your life with whom it is time to complete the relationship? Are you owning more than your share of the breakdown of a relationship? This is a saying I’ve often repeated:“There are people who come into your life for a reason…a season…a lifetime.” It’s so important to recognize which is which.  2.    I am thankful for being in pain throughout my vacation.For three years now, I have had a fair amount of medical issues around a fall I took at a local grocery store. In September, I took a vacation to St. Lucia with my daughter and daughter-in-law. If you’ve never been there, St. Lucia is a volcanic island that is very hilly. Our villa was literally built into the side of a mountain. I really struggled with all the stairs and steep inclines and declines. So the Monday after I got back from vacation, I switched up my diet, talked to my chiropractor and got a referral to a physical therapist I adore, and started with a new massage therapist. It was good for me to come face-to-face with my physical limitations – it spurred me to become aggressive in doing something about it. Maybe your limitation isn’t physical – do you struggle with a perceived mental or emotional limitation? Think you need more education or credentials to be successful? Here are your options: -Decide, today, to make some necessary changes that will move you in the right direction. Doesn’t have to be drastic; doesn’t have to be all the changes at once. Just start. -Decide you are okay - really okay – with your limitation. It’s okay if you don’t have a bachelor’s degree or are 40 lbs overweight – it’s up to you to believe you are still worthy and fully capable – and you’re going to live your fullest life anyway. If you choose this option, NO COMPLAINING. (By the way – it’s good to believe you are really okay AS you proceed to make changes in your life. It will help you get there more easily and even quicker.)  3.    I am thankful for extreme discomfort in my personal life.Throughout the year, in addition to my physical pain, I’ve experienced a lot of discomfort in my personal life. I’m thrilled with where my business is, but the other areas of my life…not so much. So I’m working with a life coach and doing work on my own to create the life I want. Here’s what I think has happened: I have had to evolve to a new version of myself in order to achieve the business success I’ve had. This new version of Lesa wants to also evolve the other areas of my life. I want to be as satisfied with my social life, how I spend my free time, and my living situation as I am with my career. I love this dissatisfaction and what it teaches me. Here’s what it can teach you: You are supposed to evolve throughout your life – and it will be extremely uncomfortable to do so. -If you don’t evolve, you’ll be extremely uncomfortable as you resist the universe’s direction for your life. So – uncomfortable either way; pick your discomfort. -Don’t let success in one area of your life overshadow the importance of the other areas of your life. They should all be evolving. -Set goals in each of the areas of your life, along with specific strategies to reach those goals.  4.    I am thankful for spending a lot of money on a coach. Here’s why: I wouldn’t have evolved to where I am in my business without investing that money in a coach. I had to be serious and committed, I had to ask a lot of myself to get my money’s worth, and I had to learn to think differently. Bonus: I’ve made a lifelong friend in my coach, who I adore beyond words. This was an unexpected, wonderful bonus. Where are you unwilling to invest in yourself? What are you thinking that is causing you to be unwilling to invest in yourself? What do you need to think to become willing to invest in yourself? It could be coaching, like me, or it could be a weight-loss program. Or a professional resume writer. Or learning ballroom dancing or how to play the piano. Learning a foreign language. Here’s what I know: It’s almost never about the money. It’s about your thoughts. About your beliefs in yourself. About your beliefs in the investment. About your ability to get the results you want.  5.    I am thankful for opportunities I said “no” to. As my practice has become more successful, I’ve had to let go of some sub-contracting work and say no to some other opportunities that were presented to me. Was it scary to, essentially, say “no” to money? Yes. What I focused on, however, was the opportunity cost of saying “yes.” Because, in each instance, these opportunities would take away from my ability to build my own business. Essentially trading in unlimited potential income for a semi-dependable $50 or $60 an hour. Just as with friendships, saying “no” to some opportunities keeps you open for others that are a better fit for you. You are keeping space open for what you REALLY want, rather than filling space with what happens to come along. As my daughter’s softball tee-shirt said: Good is the enemy of Great. Choose to wait for Great.  Are you in the wrong job that chips away at you every day? The CareerSpring document and coaching program will help you find a job that uses your zone of genius, recognizes your value, and pays you what you’re worth.  If you’re ready to take your job search to the next level by working with a highly experienced professional with a track record of client success, schedule a complimentary consult to learn more:  https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/zoom-meetings2 
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    203: Different Types of Job Interviews and How to Prepare for Each

    22:00

    Be sure to sign up for the special webinar in January – The 3 Things You Haven’t Thought About For Your Next Job Search.  Here’s the link: https://3thingswebinar.carrd.co/ Last week, I talked about how to prepare for the interview as an internal candidate. Today, I’m talking about the different types of interviews you might encounter – and how to prepare for each. I like to give attribution where it’s due, and I got much of this content from thebalancecareers.com. Many companies will tell you what type of interview you’ll be having; if they don’t, you should ask what to expect. As I think you’ll see as I go through these types of interviews, you may experience a combination of two or more types of interviews for the same job – even in the same interview.  Types of Interviews Behavioral InterviewsInterviewers use behavioral interviews to determine how you’ve handled various job situations in the past. The idea is that your past behavior predicts how you’ll act in the new job. You won’t get many easy “yes” or “no” questions, and in most cases, you’ll need to answer with an anecdote about a previous experience. Case InterviewsInterviews that include the interviewer giving you a business scenario and asking you to manage the situation are called case interviews. They’re most often used in management consulting and investment banking interviews and require you to show off your analytical ability and problem-solving skills.For example, you may be asked how to determine how big the market might be for a new type of tennis ball. That’s not much information so you’d need to ask questions such as who the target consumer is—professional tennis players or weekend tennis enthusiasts. Another question might be about how much the new tennis balls cost and how or where they are sold: in stores or online.Remember that answering a case interview question like this really isn’t about being right or wrong. The interviewer is more interested in how the applicant arrives at his or her solution.As such, a case interview is back and forth dialogue. The interviewee is expected to interact with the interviewer and ask clarifying questions in a logical, sequential order to solve the given problem. Competency-Based InterviewsInterviews that require you to give examples of specific skills are called competency-based interviews or job-specific interviews. The interviewer will ask questions that will help them determine if you have the knowledge and skills required for the specific job.Competency-based interview questions can be posed as behavioral questions, especially to evaluate things like conflict management, critical thinking, and flexibility. Some competency-based interviews will ask you to complete a timed assignment. Tips for preparing for a competency-based interview: Check the job listing for examples of required skills and abilities. For example: accountability, ambition, approachability, compliance, conflict management, critical thinking, delegation, flexibility, inclusiveness, influencing, initiative, resourcefulness, risk-taking, etc. Next, list situations in which you have demonstrated each of these competencies. Once you have prepared a list of situations, review it. By thinking of examples before the interview, you will be able to answer questions quickly and concisely.  For each skill, write down the situation, the actions you took to handle the problem, and the ultimate results. This is a modified version of the STAR interview response technique. Using this technique will help you give a brief, coherent, and structured response to interview questions.  Final InterviewsThe final interview is the last step in the interview process, and the last interview before you find out whether or not you’ll get a job offer. This type of interview is usually conducted by the CEO or other members of upper management. The key to a final interview is to take it as seriously as all the preliminary interviews—just because you were asked in for a final interview doesn’t mean you got the job yet. Group InterviewsEmployers may hold group interviews because they’re often more efficient than one-on-one interviews. There are two types of group interviews: one involves an applicant being interviewed by a group (or panel) of interviewers; the other involves one interviewer and a group of applicants.Jobs involving high-stress, fast-paced work, or customer interaction also commonly require group interviews. If you perform well during a stressful interview, you may be more apt to perform well in a challenging job. Informal InterviewsHiring managers may begin the screening process with a relaxed, informal conversation instead of a formal interview. This is more of a casual discussion than a typical job interview. On a similar note, a chat over a cupt of coffee is another less formal type of job interview.Off-Site InterviewsEmployers sometimes schedule job interviews in a public place, like a coffee shop or restaurant. Perhaps there is no local office or maybe they don’t want current employees to know about the possibility of a new hire. In any case, it’s good to be prepared for off-site interviews. Panel Job InterviewsA panel job interview takes place when you’re interviewed by a panel of interviewers. You may meet with each panel member separately or all together. And sometimes there will be a panel of interviewers and a group of candidates all in one room. Phone InterviewsWhile you're actively job searching, you may need to be prepared for a phone interview at a moment's notice. Companies often start with an unscheduled phone call, or maybe you’ll get to schedule your call. Restaurant InterviewsOne of the reasons employers take job candidates out to lunch or dinner is to evaluate their social skills and to see if they can handle themselves gracefully under pressure. Remember you’re still being observed when you participate in a job interview at a restaurant, so use your best table manners, choose foods that aren’t too messy. Second InterviewsYou passed your first interview, and you just got an email or call to schedule a second interview. This interview will be more detailed and may be several hours long. The interviewer will delve into your experience in more detail than the first round, as well as how you would fit in with the company culture. Structured InterviewsA structured interview is typically used when an employer wants to assess and compare you with candidates in an impartial way. Essentially, the interviewer asks all the candidates the same questions. If the position requires specific skills and experience, the employer will draft interview questions focusing exactly on the abilities the company is seeking. Semi-Structured InterviewA semi-structured interview is a job interview in which the interviewer does not strictly follow a list of questions. Instead, the interviewer will ask open-ended questions, allowing for a conversation rather than a straightforward question and answer format. Unstructured Job InterviewsAn unstructured interview is a job interview in which questions may be changed based on the interviewee's responses. While the interviewer may have a few set questions prepared in advance, the direction of the interview is rather casual, and questions flow based on the direction of the conversation. Unstructured interviews are often seen as less intimidating than formal interviews. Video InterviewsPerhaps you’ve applied for a remote job, or you’re interviewing for a position in another state (or country). Software programs such as Skype, Zoom, and FaceTime make video calling easy, and video interviews are becoming common. Are you in the wrong job that chips away at you every day? The CareerSpring document and coaching program will help you find a job that uses your zone of genius, recognizes your value, and pays you what you’re worth.  If you’re ready to take your job search to the next level by working with a highly experienced professional with a track record of client success, schedule a complimentary consult to learn more:  https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/zoom-meetings2 
  • The Exclusive Career Coach podcast

    202: How to Prepare for the Interview as an Internal Candidate

    20:05

    To register for “The 3 Things You HAVEN’T Thought About For Your Next Job Search” on January 11th, 2022, click here: https://3thingswebinar.carrd.co/  I’ve talked extensively about interviews on this podcast – and it’s one of my absolute favorite topics to coach my clients on. Several of my interview podcasts made it on my recent “Best of” podcast on episode #200, so it seems you listeners really want this content. This week I’m talking about how to prepare for the interview as an internal candidate; next week I’m covering the different types of job interviews and how to prepare for each. Let’s start with what you should do, if possible, before you even submit your application for an internal position. Ideally, you want to have an honest conversation with someone who can advise you as to whether you will be a serious candidate. Your boss, someone in HR, or the person who would become your boss are all viable options, and there may be others. The important thing here is to get clear direction to apply or not to apply. The downside of being an internal candidate is that sometimes you will get a courtesy interview even though they have no intention of moving forward with you – this will only cause hard feelings if you think you are a serious candidate. So they’ve said you would be a great candidate – or perhaps one of the people I mentioned before actually encourages you to apply. Now what? -Make sure your application materials are top-notch – if you think that, because you are an internal candidate, you automatically have a distinct advantage, you might cut corners. DON’T DO THIS. -Follow the same courtesies as external candidates should – send thank you notes, keep in touch throughout the process, respond quickly to any requests for additional information. -Be aware that the decision-makers will be heavily focused on your work record and recommendations from other employers they trust. So now you are in the interview. Here are strategies for acing an internal interview: 1.    “Tell me about yourself.” You HAVE to approach this question differently as an internal candidate. -If you know the person or people who are interviewing you, you don’t have to state your name – they already know it. -If you don’t know the person or at least one of the people who are interviewing you, include your name and current job title. You might also want to include your direct supervisor’s name and the department you work in…or other job titles you’ve held with the company. -Tell them things they probably don’t already know about you. -You are an insider – use that to your advantage. Use company lingo and assume your interviewers may have at least some knowledge of the projects you’ve worked on, company initiatives you’ve had a role in, and other things going on in the company.  2.    Behavioral questions. -You want to prepare for these as you would an external candidate – just be extra careful to give credit where credit is due and don’t exaggerate your role in projects.  3.    Questions to ask the interviewer. -Here, too, use your internal company knowledge to ask well-thought-out questions. You CANNOT be canned or generic with your questions as an internal candidate! This quote is from Indeed.com: “When applying within a company where you already work, you should be prepared to talk about what motivated your change, particularly if the move would not be a promotion. The person questioning you will be aware that you are already familiar with the ins and outs of the company or they may already be aware of interdepartmental differences. Be prepared to answer in-depth questions.”Here are some internal candidate-specific questions you should be prepared to answer:Why did you decide to apply for a new position with the company?What experience within our company has prepared you to assume a new role?What would you do to help your replacement should you move on to this position?Should you not be selected for this role, how would it affect your current job?What is your proudest accomplishment with the company and how does it demonstrate your readiness for this new role?Tell me about a time with the company where you received a special commendation for your work.What is the first change you would make to the way this position is currently being carried out, based on your experience at the company?·     Have you spoken about the position with your current manager? If so, what did they say?  Prepare yourself for criticism. Here’s a quote from Deakinco.com: No employee has a perfect employment record, so be prepared for some of your mistakes to come to light during the interview. Perhaps you lost a client or you billed the wrong person. Maybe you missed a deadline or you posted something you shouldn’t have on social media. These things happen, so take ownership of your mistakes and use them to talk about what you’ve learned since joining the company. Explain what happened, what went wrong, and how you can avoid making the same mistake again. Whatever you do, don’t become defensive and start blaming others. Are you in the wrong job that chips away at you every day? The CareerSpring document and coaching program will help you find a job that uses your zone of genius, recognizes your value, and pays you what you’re worth.  If you’re ready to take your job search to the next level by working with a highly experienced professional with a track record of client success, schedule a complimentary consult to learn more: https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/zoom-meetings2   
  • The Exclusive Career Coach podcast

    201: How to Position Yourself as a Freelancer...and Why You Should (with Matthew Mottola)

    38:07

    Freelancing…The Freelance Economy…Side Hustles…Entrepreneurship. As a result of COVID, many people have opted out of their corporate, non-profit, and education jobs in favor of doing their own thing. Still others are continuing to work in their previous profession, while building a side business.  Still others are contemplating a shift to self-employment.  My guest today is Matthew Mottola, author of The Human Cloud. We talk about The Freelance Economy, what it means to be a freelancer, and the good and bad reasons for entering The Freelance Economy. Matthew also gives tips for ways to start working as a freelancer – and how to make yourself indispensable as a freelancer. Matthew Mottola is a Forbes contributor who previously worked for Microsoft and has started numerous businesses. At Microsoft, in joint partnership with Upwork, he built the Microsoft 365 freelance toolkit, a tech stack for companies to spend up to $100M on remote freelancers. He has been named a Top 50 remote work expert to follow.  You can find Matt on: LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/matthewmottolaPersonal website: matthewrmottola.comThe Human Cloud Book: humancloudbook.comTwitter: twitter.com/matthewrmottola If you would like a free leadership deck on why to invest in the Human Cloud: humancloudbook/com/why-invest-in-the-human-cloud  Are you in the wrong job that chips away at you every day? The CareerSpring document and coaching program will help you find a job that uses your zone of genius, recognizes your value, and pays you what you’re worth.  If you’re ready to take your job search to the next level by working with a highly experienced professional with a track record of client success, schedule a complimentary consult to learn more:  https://calendly.com/lesaedwards/zoom-meetings2  
  • The Exclusive Career Coach podcast

    200: Episode 200: Celebrating the Best of the Best

    25:12

    For this special episode, I've pulled snippets of wisdom from the top 10 most-listened-to episodes of The Exclusive Career Coach podcast.

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