The Angular Show podcast

E069 - Ionic

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Angular + Ionic = ❤️

In this episode of the Angular Show, we had the opportunity to sit down and chat with Max Lynch, the co-founder of Ionic. If you haven't heard of Ionic, it's a set of components for rendering native controls on iOS and Android that enables web developers to build apps that are executed on phones and tablets that include core native device functionality. As web developers we are really good at creating applications that use a template (HTML) that is styled (CSS) and is dynamic and interactive (JS). If you think about it, that sounds like a lot of the apps that are available in Google Play and the App Store. Further, as Max points out, it's really about using the GPU to render bitmaps to the screen, which a webview is more than capable of doing. So, why not create the apps of today and the future using a stack like Angular and Ionic?

In this episode, Max shares the history of how they got started with Ionic, from rebuilding Cordova and PhoneGap, to solving the developer experience using new tooling, building the component view library, and Capacitor, an open-source cross-platform native bridge built and supported by the Ionic team.

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