Into America podcast

The Black Firefighters of 9/11

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Every September 11th, people across the country commemorate the emergency service workers and countless civilians who were lost on 9/11. This includes the Vulcan Society, an organization of former and active Black firefighters in New York City, who gather at a memorial every year to remember the 12 Black firefighters who lost their lives. 

But many Black firefighters and the families of these fallen heroes feel these men have been overlooked and unrecognized.   

On the 20th anniversary of 9/11, Trymaine Lee speaks with Kevin Maynard, whosetwin brother Keith was one of the firefighters killed that day. Kevin, who now works for the Houston Fire Department, talks about the brothers’ different paths to becoming firefighters, and his struggles with grief since Keith’s death.

Trymaine also speaks with Captain Paul Washington, the head of Engine 234, a majority Black firehouse in Brooklyn, who was the president of the Vulcan Society during 9/11. Captain Washington talks about how the Vulcan Society pushed for recognition of the Black firefighters who died, and their larger fight for Black representation in the department.

For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica

Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com

Further Reading and Listening: [[POD ONLY]]:

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