Humans of Martech podcast

43: There’s a domain reputation behind every email

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What’s up everyone, this is part 2 of our two part episode on email deliverability and getting into the primary tab in Gmail.

If you haven’t yet, start with last week’s episode where we covered 2 crucial classification factors according to Google. The content in your email and how users interact with your emails.

Here’s today’s main takeaway: Most email marketers understand that email domain and IP reputation play a critical role in your ability to land in the inbox. But most email marketers will admit they are easily spooked by all the accompanying fancy authentication acronyms. SPF, DKIM, DMARC, they just mean allowing Gmail and other email clients to verify you as the sender. We’ll break those and many more email deliverability tips right now.

Today’s episode will cover things you can do that would help with other email clients, not just Gmail. We’ll cover sender reputation, authentication as well as tactics in your automation tool to improve deliverability. 


3. Sender rep

We know for sure that factors that influence the spam folder are also factors in the inbox vs promos tab, that’s who the email is from. There’s an IP behind the sender, but there’s a domain behind the IP.

Domain reputation vs sender ip reputation.

There’s two main types of email reputation that can affect your sending:
1) IP Reputation and
2) Domain Reputation.

Both reputation scores are calculated separately but as you’ll see as we unpack things, both scores are closely related as your sending ip is mapped to your domain.

Mailgun has a dope article on this https://www.mailgun.com/blog/domain-ip-reputation-gmail-care-more-about/ Mailgun claims that things like domain age, how the domain identifies across the web and whether it identifies with entertainment, advertising or finance industries can all impact your domain reputation. They believe domain reputation ultimately matters more to Google.

Other suspected factors by rejoiner.com

Domain reputation / Past behavior of the sender
If you’ve been sending heaving promo/spam offers through email to hundreds of thousands of people for x years, you’re bound to have a mountain of recipients that marked you as spam. So just because a subscriber is new, it doesn’t mean you start fresh. A lot of senders actually have a ton of baggage from previous sends.

Google is quite clear about this: When messages from your domain are reported as spam, future messages are more likely to be delivered to the spam folder. Over time, many spam reports can lower your domain’s reputation.

Gmail best practices
Google provides a list of best practices for sending to gmail users, it’s not overly helpful but it has some valuable tips. Aside from the obvious, don’t impersonate another company, don’t test phishing scams and make sure your domain is marked as safe, here’s 3 things Google recommends:

  1. Authentication: Allow Gmail to verify the sender by setting up reverse DNS (domain name). This means pointing your email sending IP addresses to your company domain. 
  2. Small number of sending IPs: Google recommends you stick to just 1 sending IP. They add that if you must send from multiple IPs, use different IP addresses for different types of messages. Ie; one IP for blog, subscriber emails, one for important product updates, one for upsell and promo. 
    1. I often hear email marketers say that if you are getting stuck in the promo tab, just start a fresh new sending IP. The problem there is that this is a short term benefit. If you don’t make changes to your domain, that new IP is still authenticated to the same source with the same baggage. 
    2. I have heard anecdotely that using separate sending IPs for customers vs leads greatly helps. But I know companies that don’t use this well and still have solid metrics. 
  3. Different senders: Along the same lines, Google encourages you to use a different ‘from sender’s for different types of emails and that you don't mix different types of content in the same emails. 
    1. Ie, your purchase confirmation/new customer onboarding flow should be sent by [email protected] and never include subscriber or promotional content. Your promotional emails should be sent from [email protected]. So stick to as little sending IPs as possible, but switch up your sender for different types of emails. 


Domain authentication
There’s different ways of setting up authentication for your sending IPs with Gmail. The process will be slightly different depending on your hosting provider and your ESP. 

There’s currently 3 main authentication methods to prevent email spoofing; aka spammers from sending emails that appear to be from your domain:

  • SPF record (sender policy framework)
  • DKIM keys (DomainKeys Identified Mail) 
  • DMARC record (Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance)


SPF
Publish an SPF record for your domain.
AKA Pointer (PTR) record. Every SPF has a single TXT file that specifies servers and domains that are allowed to send on behalf of your domain. You do this by uploading your updated TXT file on your domain provider settings.

DKIM
Turn on DKIM signing for your messages.

DKIM lets a company take ownership of an email. This is why the reputation of your company domain (not your sending IP) is the basis for evaluating whether to trust the message for further handling, such as delivery.

DKIM uses a pair of cryptographic keys, one private and one public. A private key aka the secret signature is added to the header of all your emails. A matching public key is added to your DNS record. Email servers that receive your messages use the public key to decrypt the private key in your signature. That’s how they verify the message was not changed after it was sent.

Google has a simple guide for doing this, you start by generating a key for your domain, and just like your SPF record, you add the key to your domain's DNS records.

DMARC

Publish a DMARC record for your domain. DMARC is used in combo with SPF and DKIM, should be setup after.

Specifically helps you prevent spoofing, aka a message that appears to be from your company but is not.
It checks whether the From: header matches the sending domain in your SPF/DKIM check.

Once you start sending after DMARC is setup, you can start to access reports from email servers that help you identify possible authentication issues and malicious activity.

Google has a nifty recommended DMARC rollout which encourages you to start with a none policy so you can view reports before you start being more restrictive.

Eventually you can grow to a quarantine policy which basically puts messages in Spam for your recipients. The strictess policy is reject, in this case messages aren’t sent to spam, they never reach the recipient.

Postmaster tools
Get detailed information about your IP and domain’s reputation with Postmaster Tools.
https://support.google.com/mail/answer/6227174 
You can use PT to get data on large email sends from your sending domain.

Google gives you a dashboard with data on:

Spam rate: % of emails marked as spam vs. went to inbox

Sending IP reputation: better rep = better chances of landing in inbox
Domain reputation

So, what is a good sender score? You want to be as close to 100 as possible. But you definitely want to keep your domain reputation above 70.

*Google says: Tip: Keep in mind that spam filtering is based on thousands of signals, and IP reputation is just one of them.*

4. What you can do in your ESP

Send to engaged subscribers only
Use double opt in
Be upfront about what and how often you’ll send
Auto suppress disengaged people

Keep your list clean
Have data hygiene programs that look for things like invalid emails, fake emails, catch-all emails, disposable emails

Consistency and warming up a new sending IP
One thing Google notes as important is to increase your sending volume slowly. If you have a big list and you send many emails, it’s important to send a consistent amount of emails rather than having big spikes/bursts. 

So to recap:

  • Companies should not focus on getting out of the promos tab and into the primary inbox
  • The focus should be on providing valuable content that your subscribers enjoy reading and engaging with, we covered a bunch of ways you can help get into the right inbox
  • How? Use as little HTML as possible. Write like a person to a person. 
  • Limit the promo words you use in your copy
  • Reply to the email seems the best way to get users to tell gmail that you are legit and you deserve to be in the main inbox
  • There’s an IP behind the sender, but there’s a domain behind the IP, understanding sending reputation will help you as an email marketer.
  • There’s currently 3 main authentication methods and they aren’t as scary as they sound, learn the basics and know how to talk to your IT team about them
  • Get detailed information about your IP and domain’s reputation with Postmaster Tools.
  • Send to engaged subscribers only and keep your lists super clean yo


✌️

--
Intro music by Wowa via Unminus
Cover art created with help via Undraw

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Is being a digital nomad really as good as it looks? Yes, maybe even better. lolRemote commsYou’re servicing a team of what 40+ marketing and sales teammates? How do you effectively communicate and collaborate with your team remotely from your spain office?  Honestly, a lot of my role is answering emails and messages, but I find that being six hours ahead and having my mornings free because my team isn’t online yet allows me to hunker down without distractions and get stuff done. Then when people start to come online I have time to focus on them, hop on calls or zoom meetings, and dedicate that time to them.  Everyone knows my schedule, they know that I’m only online until noon their time so they book meetings or slack message me during that time. As long as we communicate our schedules everything works.  I try to both remain flexible if there’s something that needs to be done, but also stick to my working hours so that I don’t just have my face buried in my computer at all hours.  It helps to have people on your team that you trust to do a good job and that you can direct others towards as well.  How to say noOne of my favorite quotes from a presentation you gave to my students this year while describing your role and journey was:“everything is doable, but it doesn’t mean you should do it” lolMaybe walk us through some of the stories behind that mantra and why it might be helpful for other marketers when it comes to prioritization and concentration. Honestly, I’ve seen too many intermediary platform connections fail.  I try to weigh how valuable an automation or a connection will be against how many connections and tools it requires.  If you’re trying to eliminate three clicks from a process but I need to connect four different platforms to make that happen, I’ll likely say no because the odds of one of those connections failing is high and then we need to do damage control which will take a lot more time than your three clicks, you know?  One thing that I’ve also learned is that everyone thinks everything they ask for is super important. And sometimes these things are only very important until they forget about them two days later. I once spent a few days connecting things and configuring things, working with a platform’s support team to get a couple reports combined that came from different sources that had very different ways of presenting data because it was vital that we combined these two numbers, but then when it was all said and done, no one cared or used the new report.  Sometimes if I’m questioning the importance of someone’s ask, I like to let it stew for a couple of days just to determine if it’s really as important now as it was two days ago. I’ve also come across some things where it was like… “hey can do you automate this repetitive task” OR “can you set up a notification for this thing that happens a lot, I need to know when it happens”. Then a few weeks later I get the “hey, can you turn this off, it’s really annoying” message.  TrainingAs someone who works in Ops, you don’t always get the chance to play on the front lines and do customer facing stuff. You often need to also focus on your teammates.Walk us through how big of a role training and facilitation comes into play in your day to day? Honestly, it’s in my best interest to make sure my team knows how to use the tools at their disposal.  What good is it to me to set up processes and tools if people don’t know how to use them? Then we end up paying for things we don’t need.  The other thing is that a big part of ops is to make things as efficient as possible for those customer-facing teams. In the end if I make their jobs easier, they can do more of what they’re meant to do and that leads to more revenue and more growth which is the goal we’re all working towards.  No barriers Something I struggled with when I was in an Ops role was that I didn’t always get to pick projects, I didn’t always get a say in strategy. So if you could remove all barriers and constraints, what project or idea would you love to tackle or be known for solving.I love implementation projects. I like new tools and I like setting them up. Which is again another area where I feel like I got super lucky. At the time that I was brought on to the team at Rewind we were looking to implement Hubspot -- admittedly this is part of the reason I was hired -- so I got to spearhead that project and set up our platform from scratch. Now that we’re growing and in need of a better sales tool I’m leading a Salesforce implementation project. In the past I’ve been handed over both of these platforms and have had to learn what the heck people did, whether it was done right, how to fix the things that weren’t -- and trust me there were a lot of those. So I really like being part of the entire planning and implementation from the start. Advice for your past self - What skills would you focus on early in your career? Well.. I learnt pretty much everything I know through doing. I didn’t have marketing training, didn’t have sales or support experience. I went to school for writing and ended up in marketing. So I do think it would have helped to learn more about those aspects right from the start.  But honestly, I’ve always been a curious person, my mother will reassure you of that. So I don’t really have any regrets or times where I’ve thought “damn, I wish I’d focused on that earlier” because in the end I may not have ended up where I am and I am so so happy to be here.  Maybe some advice for my past self would be to stop doubting myself.  We often hear: “fake it ‘till you make it” but I like to think of it more as of “be confident that you can learn what you need to as you go”.  But be honest and upfront about what you know while reassuring yourself and people around you that you aren’t afraid or willing to really dive in get shit done.  Why Ops?We can dive into some of these roles a bit closer but I wanted to start by getting your take on why you gravitate towards Ops?  This is always a funny question for me, because I didn’t really ever think about ending up in an ops role.  I kind of just started in a specific role, content writing, then broadened my role when I went in-house as a marketing generalist.  I got to slowly shape my role as we brought more people into the marketing team. I was able to dictate which areas of my job I wanted to keep and which we would hire someone to take responsibility for.  Which in the end I ended up taking care of all the automation and operations of the marketing team, then got thrown into Salesforce and sales ops when we needed someone to manage it.  My role kind of shaped itself in that way and honestly I couldn’t be happier with it. I may have been able to get here faster or in a more direct way had I known where I was going with it, but I learnt so much along the way about all the different moving parts of RevOps that I wouldn’t change it if I could.  Why should everyone be excited about RevOps? Well, one thing that I heard a lot along the way was that “we need to get marketing and sales working together.” I think RevOps is important because that’s really the essence of it. Getting all of our customer-facing teams (this is what I call the ensemble of marketing, sales, and support) working together. In my experience, no one on either of these teams is going to take that responsibility. Sales wants to do what sales wants to do, marketing and support to. Everyone agrees that we should be aligned, but no one wants to be the one to take charge of it.  By creating or bringing in RevOps, we designate that as its own role and people are start to realize how beneficial it is. AND you remove the bias that would be there if you gave the responsibility to a member of either of those teams, you know?  Why ops in startup land? You’ve worked in (at least) two high growth startups.  This is another entirely unintended part of my journey.  It’s just another example of me landing where I needed to be. Funnily, in university and college I thought to myself “I really want a nice cushy government job.”  At my last job I realized how untrue that was just because I randomly ended up in a high growth startup and yes, it can be stressful, but you get to do a lot of fun things. I never would have been able to shape my role as I did if I were in a big company or working for the government.  I liked moving around in my role, I liked building my team, and I like having too much to do in a way. When it comes to work I get bored easily. If I had to do the same thing day after day I’d go crazy.  Ops lets me be part of a lot of different things and lets me work with a lot of really great people.  I know I’ll be working with startups for a looong time because of this. I like seeing big ideas come to life and I like even more being able to contribute to them.  Last questionWe always end by asking, aside from eating KPIs for breakfast, what strategies do you take to stay sane and happy while balancing work and your personal life? Having a separate office  Not having slack notifications on my phone Not sleeping with my phone in my room  I’ve actually stopped using facebook and instagram for almost a year now. I still have my accounts but rarely log on to them and was surprised to see how little of it I missed. I think it’s been great for my mental health and has allowed me to let go of my devices a bit.  LinksCatch Roxanne on LinkedInCatch Roxanne on TwitterCheck out Rewind's awesome WP site✌️--Intro music by Wowa via UnminusCover art created with help via Undraw
  • Humans of Martech podcast

    43: There’s a domain reputation behind every email

    30:11

    What’s up everyone, this is part 2 of our two part episode on email deliverability and getting into the primary tab in Gmail.If you haven’t yet, start with last week’s episode where we covered 2 crucial classification factors according to Google. The content in your email and how users interact with your emails. Here’s today’s main takeaway: Most email marketers understand that email domain and IP reputation play a critical role in your ability to land in the inbox. But most email marketers will admit they are easily spooked by all the accompanying fancy authentication acronyms. SPF, DKIM, DMARC, they just mean allowing Gmail and other email clients to verify you as the sender. We’ll break those and many more email deliverability tips right now.Today’s episode will cover things you can do that would help with other email clients, not just Gmail. We’ll cover sender reputation, authentication as well as tactics in your automation tool to improve deliverability. 3. Sender repWe know for sure that factors that influence the spam folder are also factors in the inbox vs promos tab, that’s who the email is from. There’s an IP behind the sender, but there’s a domain behind the IP.Domain reputation vs sender ip reputation. There’s two main types of email reputation that can affect your sending: 1) IP Reputation and 2) Domain Reputation. Both reputation scores are calculated separately but as you’ll see as we unpack things, both scores are closely related as your sending ip is mapped to your domain.Mailgun has a dope article on this https://www.mailgun.com/blog/domain-ip-reputation-gmail-care-more-about/ Mailgun claims that things like domain age, how the domain identifies across the web and whether it identifies with entertainment, advertising or finance industries can all impact your domain reputation. They believe domain reputation ultimately matters more to Google.Other suspected factors by rejoiner.comDomain reputation / Past behavior of the senderIf you’ve been sending heaving promo/spam offers through email to hundreds of thousands of people for x years, you’re bound to have a mountain of recipients that marked you as spam. So just because a subscriber is new, it doesn’t mean you start fresh. A lot of senders actually have a ton of baggage from previous sends. Google is quite clear about this: When messages from your domain are reported as spam, future messages are more likely to be delivered to the spam folder. Over time, many spam reports can lower your domain’s reputation.Gmail best practicesGoogle provides a list of best practices for sending to gmail users, it’s not overly helpful but it has some valuable tips. Aside from the obvious, don’t impersonate another company, don’t test phishing scams and make sure your domain is marked as safe, here’s 3 things Google recommends: Authentication: Allow Gmail to verify the sender by setting up reverse DNS (domain name). This means pointing your email sending IP addresses to your company domain.  Small number of sending IPs: Google recommends you stick to just 1 sending IP. They add that if you must send from multiple IPs, use different IP addresses for different types of messages. Ie; one IP for blog, subscriber emails, one for important product updates, one for upsell and promo.  I often hear email marketers say that if you are getting stuck in the promo tab, just start a fresh new sending IP. The problem there is that this is a short term benefit. If you don’t make changes to your domain, that new IP is still authenticated to the same source with the same baggage.  I have heard anecdotely that using separate sending IPs for customers vs leads greatly helps. But I know companies that don’t use this well and still have solid metrics.  Different senders: Along the same lines, Google encourages you to use a different ‘from sender’s for different types of emails and that you don't mix different types of content in the same emails. Ie, your purchase confirmation/new customer onboarding flow should be sent by [email protected] and never include subscriber or promotional content. Your promotional emails should be sent from [email protected] So stick to as little sending IPs as possible, but switch up your sender for different types of emails.  Domain authenticationThere’s different ways of setting up authentication for your sending IPs with Gmail. The process will be slightly different depending on your hosting provider and your ESP. There’s currently 3 main authentication methods to prevent email spoofing; aka spammers from sending emails that appear to be from your domain: SPF record (sender policy framework) DKIM keys (DomainKeys Identified Mail)  DMARC record (Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance) SPFPublish an SPF record for your domain. AKA Pointer (PTR) record. Every SPF has a single TXT file that specifies servers and domains that are allowed to send on behalf of your domain. You do this by uploading your updated TXT file on your domain provider settings. DKIMTurn on DKIM signing for your messages. DKIM lets a company take ownership of an email. This is why the reputation of your company domain (not your sending IP) is the basis for evaluating whether to trust the message for further handling, such as delivery. DKIM uses a pair of cryptographic keys, one private and one public. A private key aka the secret signature is added to the header of all your emails. A matching public key is added to your DNS record. Email servers that receive your messages use the public key to decrypt the private key in your signature. That’s how they verify the message was not changed after it was sent.Google has a simple guide for doing this, you start by generating a key for your domain, and just like your SPF record, you add the key to your domain's DNS records.DMARCPublish a DMARC record for your domain. DMARC is used in combo with SPF and DKIM, should be setup after. Specifically helps you prevent spoofing, aka a message that appears to be from your company but is not. It checks whether the From: header matches the sending domain in your SPF/DKIM check. Once you start sending after DMARC is setup, you can start to access reports from email servers that help you identify possible authentication issues and malicious activity.Google has a nifty recommended DMARC rollout which encourages you to start with a none policy so you can view reports before you start being more restrictive.Eventually you can grow to a quarantine policy which basically puts messages in Spam for your recipients. The strictess policy is reject, in this case messages aren’t sent to spam, they never reach the recipient. Postmaster toolsGet detailed information about your IP and domain’s reputation with Postmaster Tools.https://support.google.com/mail/answer/6227174 You can use PT to get data on large email sends from your sending domain.Google gives you a dashboard with data on:Spam rate: % of emails marked as spam vs. went to inboxSending IP reputation: better rep = better chances of landing in inboxDomain reputationSo, what is a good sender score? You want to be as close to 100 as possible. But you definitely want to keep your domain reputation above 70.*Google says: Tip: Keep in mind that spam filtering is based on thousands of signals, and IP reputation is just one of them.*4. What you can do in your ESPSend to engaged subscribers onlyUse double opt inBe upfront about what and how often you’ll sendAuto suppress disengaged peopleKeep your list cleanHave data hygiene programs that look for things like invalid emails, fake emails, catch-all emails, disposable emailsConsistency and warming up a new sending IPOne thing Google notes as important is to increase your sending volume slowly. If you have a big list and you send many emails, it’s important to send a consistent amount of emails rather than having big spikes/bursts. So to recap: Companies should not focus on getting out of the promos tab and into the primary inbox The focus should be on providing valuable content that your subscribers enjoy reading and engaging with, we covered a bunch of ways you can help get into the right inbox How? Use as little HTML as possible. Write like a person to a person.  Limit the promo words you use in your copy Reply to the email seems the best way to get users to tell gmail that you are legit and you deserve to be in the main inbox There’s an IP behind the sender, but there’s a domain behind the IP, understanding sending reputation will help you as an email marketer. There’s currently 3 main authentication methods and they aren’t as scary as they sound, learn the basics and know how to talk to your IT team about them Get detailed information about your IP and domain’s reputation with Postmaster Tools. Send to engaged subscribers only and keep your lists super clean yo ✌️--Intro music by Wowa via UnminusCover art created with help via Undraw
  • Humans of Martech podcast

    42: Exit through the promos tab, even as a brand

    21:11

    In 2013, Google rolled out “A new inbox that puts you back in control” that allowed Gmail users to split incoming emails into different tabs. Today, 1 in 5 users enable the promos tab. It’s got a bad reputation: The promotions tab. Companies that send marketing emails are still trying to find ways out of the promos tab and into the primary tab. Here’s today’s main takeaway:Most companies should accept that their marketing emails are destined for the promos tab in Gmail. Instead they should focus on standing out from all the other newsletters. --and consider themselves lucky they aren’t in the spam folder. But there is good news. If your business is willing to radically change their HTML heavy templated email strategy in favor of a personal 1-1 text based strategy, brands can find a way into the primary tab.To get there, you need to get past two gates:The first gate is the spam filter and your reputation scores, the second gate is the category filter in Gmail and all the different signals that help classify incoming emails.In this two part episode we’ll walk you through the best ways to get past both of those gates.Gmail filter classification factorshttps://cloud.google.com/blog/products/gmail/how-gmail-sorts-your-email-based-on-your-preferences Google has said that Gmail’s classification system is pretty complex. It uses machine learning to choose which tab to put an email based on a bunch of factors.We’ll cover 4 main buckets over two episodes:1. Email content What’s in the emails, html, links, content types2. Personal actions Gmail says the most important factor in determining where an email lands in your inbox is your personal actions and preferences from that sender. 3. Sender rep The first factor they list is who the email is from. We’ll cover domain and IP reputation as well as authentication.4. Other things in your ESP that could help you reach the inbox1. Email contentThe default tabs/categoriesGmail has 5 default tabs/categories. They provide loose definitions for both, but the titles are pretty self explanatory. Primary, social, promos, updates and forums. Still though, businesses sending marketing emails will be asking how they can bypass the promos tab and get into the primary tab.Instead, businesses should accept that they live in the promos tab and they need to stand out from other newsletters and other onboarding emails. From the little bit we know about how Gmail classifies tabs, we can conclude that emails that land in the primary tab are: From people you know, not businesses Not from social network sites or forums Not marketing or promotional based, not newsletters or CTA emails Not notifications or updates or bills That being said. There is room for marketing emails, or emails from brands in your primary inbox tab, if you treat that content from a brand like it was someone you knew and frequently communicated with. How? Use as little HTML as possible. Write like a person to a person. Instead of sending your email from [email protected], they send it from Brad. An actual person on their growth team.It doesn’t have a fancy HTML template with a bunch of images. It’s straight up, it’s funny, it’s helpful. It’s almost as if, despite working for a brand, this email came from someone you know.That’s how you get in the primary tab. Get your users to interact with your email.What are other content elements to keep in mind?We’ve talked about this one before, most gmail users treat email as a personal medium. Google knows if you’re sending an email with the words “discount” or “promotion” or if your html/image to text ratio is way too heavy html you’re destined for the promos tab, and without a major overhaul in your email strategy, you’re staying in that tab. Google recommends the obvious like, follow internet format standards, follow HTML standards, make sure users know where they’ll go when they click links, sender info should be clear, subject should be relevant, etc… But one thing lots overlook is how Gmail treats dynamic content/hidden content in emails.Don’t use HTML and CSS to hide content in your messages. Hiding content might cause messages to be marked as spam.Many ESPs offer “dynamic” or “personalized” content, meaning you can change the message based on the recipient. Sometimes ESP are simply using CSS and HTML to hide parts of a message.2. Personal actions Past behaviour of the recipientIf you haven’t opened someone’s newsletter for a while or you never clicked in an emailVs if you opened the first 3 emails and clicked on each and replied to 2 or you added the sender to your list of contacts Huge difference in signals to Gmail.Spam filter: Add to contact listThere’s really just 1 tip listed by Google currently on how to help prevent valid messages from being marked as spam or going to the promos tab:Messages that have a From address in the recipient’s Contacts list are less likely to be marked as spam. -> encourage new subscribers to add you as a contact in Gmail. Make it easy for them. Keep in mind though that using different senders makes things trickier in this case.Category filter: Similarly, Gmail says the most important factor in determining where an email lands in your inbox tabs is your personal actions and preferences from that sender. They list 4 things users can do to teach Gmail over time to classify an email from a certain sender to your primary tab. One of them is the same tip to stay out of spam filters (add sender to contact list).  Click a drag a email from the promo tab to the primary tab, you can instruct gmail to remember this preference in the future from the same sender Create a filter that marks emails from a sender as important or destined for primary tab  Add senders to your contact list Reply to the email Those are all great things to encourage your fresh email subscribers to do to encourage they land in the right spot in their inbox.There’s something dishonest about asking right off the bat that a user adds you to their contact list, or drags your email out of the promo tab into the primary tab or even less create a filter and mark the sender as important lol.Reply to the email seems as the most legit way to get users to tell gmail that you are legit and you deserve to be in the main inbox. Benchmarks Google also lists how gmail users have interacted with similar content as a classification factor.  You have little control over this one.I think that’s enough for today, we covered half of the classification factors, the content you have in your emails, consider a radical change in strategy if you really want to get in the primary tab, if not, make the most of your spot in the promos tab and consider that users are treating it as an extension of their inbox. Google also says one of the most important factors is how individual users treat and interact with incoming emails. That’s why it’s important to get subscribers to reply to the emails that you send from a human on your team.Next week we’ll take a deep dive into practical tips for blowing past the first gate, the spam filter. Email sender reputation, authentication and we’ll also chat about tactics you can deploy in your automation platform to improve deliverability.✌️--Intro music by Wowa via UnminusCover art created with help via Undraw
  • Humans of Martech podcast

    41: Manuela Barcenas: From first marketer to team manager

    37:46

    What’s up everyone, today on the show we are joined by another local favorite marketer, Manuel Bárcenas.She’s a personal growth enthusiast and a startup marketer on a mission to help managers & their teams work better together. By the age of 18, Manuela had lived in three different countries: Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. In 2014, she decided it was time for a new challenge and moved to Canada. She’s a journalism and communications graduate of Carleton here in Ottawa. She caught the startup marketing bug pretty early interning with Startup Canada right out of school and then working as a community developer at Carleton University.  In 2018, Manuela was marketing hire #1 at Fellow.app one of the hottest startups in Ottawa. She’s been living the startup marketing life for nearly 3 years.At Fellow, she helped launch the successful Supermanagers podcast, she runs a huge newsletter (Manager TLDR newsletter) and self taught Hubspot and Google Analytics and much more.Manuela is a rising star and a must follow on marketing Twitter, she tweets about mindset, marketing and management. Manuela, thanks so much for coming on the show.Early journey When you started at Fellow as the first marketer, did you have any idea what you’d be doing? Bring us back in time to your first couple months at Fellow. What was/did you have a 'calling moment' for marketing tech / marketing What was your biggest hurdle(s) as a 1 person marketing team and how did you adjust as the team grew When you look at the t-shaped marketer today, where do you see your specialty and how that’s evolved in the last 3 years Marketing tech  Your journey learning Hubspot and other tools  The newsletter and the podcast. Talk to us about the engine behind the scenes and the growth of both of these huge projects Misc Talk us through your journey of writing and learning about management and then becoming a manager yourself and now leading a team What advice do you have for early marketers that want to become managers? We always end by asking how you balance everything in your life and how do you stay happy :) Some awesome tweets from Manuela:https://twitter.com/ManuelaBarcenas/status/1337155886545039362 https://twitter.com/ManuelaBarcenas/status/1395077830250225664 --Manuela on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/manuelabarcenas/  Manuela on Twitter: https://twitter.com/manuelabarcenas Fellow.app: https://fellow.app/Supermanagers Podcast: https://fellow.app/supermanagers/Fellow blog: https://fellow.app/blog/Manager TL;DR Newsletter: https://fellow.app/newsletter/✌️--Intro music by Wowa via UnminusCover art created with help via Undraw

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