Breakthroughs podcast

Variants of Interest and of Concern with Judd Hultquist, PhD

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This spring, the World Health Organization began using the Greek alphabet to label key variants of SARS-CoV-2. The Greek names make it easier to talk about variants with the public, but in the scientific community these variants are being discussed and studied at the molecular level to learn as much as possible about their evolution, replication and mutation. Judd Hultquist, PhD, shares insight on SARS-CoV-2 variants. He is an assistant professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Feinberg and an HIV scientist whose lab has shifted many resources to study SARS-CoV-2, to track the origin of its variants and also understand how antiviral proteins found in humans can protect against COVID-19 and other viruses.

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